Psychology Bulletin Overview – Asbury University
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Dr. Paul Nesselroade, Chair

The Psychology Department presents mainstream scientific psychological information and theories and intentionally evaluates this content from a distinctly Christian perspective. As we model in our academic program, we prepare and expect students to integrate psychology and their faith both professionally and personally.

Within this integrative approach, the Psychology program has established the following goals.

  1. The program will provide students with an overall knowledge of psychology, including, but not limited to, motivation, emotion, intelligence, health, social behavior, learning, physiological studies, sensation, perception, consciousness, development, memory, thinking, personality, psychological disorders, and psychotherapy.
  2. The program will prepare students for professions in the following areas (not exhaustive) – residential care, social and human services, management, marketing, sales, human resources, health-care related positions, corrections, etc. – and for professions requiring graduate study in the following areas (not exhaustive) – clinical or counseling psychology, experimental psychology, pastoral and Christian ministries, child or school counseling, forensic psychology, expressive (art or music) therapies, student development, medicine, nursing, legal professions, teaching, etc.
  3. In addition, reflecting the institutional purpose to develop the whole person, the program encourages all psychology majors to grow in their personal-social-spiritual development.
  4. Finally, the program provides students with an awareness of ethical problems in the application and acquisition of psychological knowledge, both in the present as well as from a historical perspective, and prepares and expects them to act ethically.

Major and Minor requirements

In addition, students may enrich their psychology major by adding one or more optional emphases. Each of these emphases allows the students to tailor their psychology elective courses and nine of their general elective credit hours around their intrinsic and vocational interests. The emphases include:

  • Equine Facilitated Mental Health Concentration – for students interested in the application of psychology to mental health and therapy models that incorporate the utilization of horses.
  • Clinical/Counseling Psychology Concentration – for students interested in psychology as applied in the assessment and treatment of psychological issues.
  • Christian Counseling/Psychology Concentration – for students interested in Christian models of counseling and/or in working in Christian settings.
  • Child Psychology Concentration – for students interested in psychology as applied in work with children and/or within the school system.
  • Forensic Psychology Concentration – for students interested in psychology as applied in the justice and correctional systems.
  • Biological Psychology Concentration – for students interested in the interrelationship between biological and psychological processes.
  • Social Psychology Concentration – for students interested in a more in-depth understanding of the interpersonal dynamics of behavior, culture, and mental life.
  • Student Development Psychology Concentration – for students interested in the application of psychology to understanding and working with college/university students.

Admission Requirements

Full admission into the psychology program is dependent upon successful completion of PSY101, PSY275, and PSY276 with a minimum grade of ‘C’ in each class. Students earning less than a ‘C’ should retake any of these classes to achieve a grade of ‘C’ prior to enrolling in PSY 375 and PSY 376. (For low grades in PSY 101, and in lieu of retaking PSY 101, students may take the Asbury University General Knowledge of Psychology Test with the goal of achieving a grade of 60% to satisfy PSY 101.)

2018-19 Bulletin