English Courses – Asbury University
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Advising Guide

This guide provides a quick overview of the normal two-year rotation of courses in the English Department. This schedule is subject to change, based on enrollment and staffing. For specific times and days, please consult the official online schedule published by the Registrar.

Course Offerings for Fall 2021

▾ ENG 200 - Introduction to Teaching English as a Second Language

Prof. Dupree TR 3:30-4:45 p.m.

The ability to teach English as a second language can open many opportunities for you. Teachers are needed throughout the United States to teach ESL to immigrants, both children and adults. It can be a means to support yourself if you want to live abroad. Most importantly, it is an invaluable tool for tent-making missionaries. In some countries, the Bible can be used as your students’ reader!

We will begin by taking a look at the basics of phonetics, which has greatly changed the teaching of languages in the last thirty years. Then, we will look at the theory of first language acquisition, important to the teaching of ESL to pre-adolescents, and afterwards, at the theory of second language acquisition, our main focus for the class. We will discuss various applications of the theories as we go along and examine classroom techniques for teaching aspects of languages. The final part of the class will be presentations of special needs of ESL teachers when working with students of particular cultures and language groups.

▾ ENG 230 - Introduction to Literature

Dr. Brown MWF 4:00-4:50

Are you ready to learn about the (metaphorical) nuts and bolts that go into making great poetry and fiction? Would you like to be able to say that you really understand a group of iconic poems and short stories by some of the world’s greatest writers? Are you ready to go beyond Literature and Culture? Would you like to be in a class where everyone shares your passion for words and story? If so, then ENG 230: Introduction to Literature is the class for you. This is a course that all literature lovers (not just English majors) can do well in and enjoy.

English 230 is designed as an initial class in the art of critical reading and a stepping stone to upper-division work. Through a survey of the elements of fiction, poetry, and drama, English 230 will help students to develop the knowledge and the skills they need for a greater understanding and a greater enjoyment of literature.

Text: Perrine’s Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense (Eleventh Edition) edited by Arp and Johnson. ISBN-13: 978-0495897965

▾ ENG 231 - British Literary Traditions I

Dr. Gobin MWF 11:00-11:50

ENG 231 is a survey of English literature from its medieval beginnings through the 18th century. As we mark the development of a people, their language, and their culture, we will read texts as diverse as the first English epic, Beowulf, and John Donne’s devotional poetry. Other authors we will sample include William Shakespeare, Jonathan Swift, Geoffrey Chaucer, Ben Jonson, William Congreve, Mary Astell, Daniel Defoe, and Queen Elizabeth I, to name just a few. We will read a variety of genres, including satire, epic and lyric poetry, drama, and prose. Class meetings will consist of discussion supplemented by lecture.

▾ ENG 261 - American Literature I: Beginnings to 1865

Dr. Penner MWF 8:00-8:50

A survey of American literature from the early Colonial period through 1865 won’t capture all of the subjects and styles of writing during that time. But what it can do is show you how literature interacted with culture to record and shape a changing American identity.

We begin with literature that defines America through cultural clashes: Britain against its former colonies, Native Americans against early settlers, and competing strains of Christianity. Within a few decades of American independence, however, the rest of the world defined it by its relation to slavery. Much of the writing of the nineteenth century reflects this conflict within America even as it attempts to offer a unified vision to the rest of the world. In the midst of these civil tensions, a third conversation takes place among those who seize on the “frontier” mentality of America by encouraging a similar exploration, this time psychological, into the making of the American individual.

▾ ENG 315 - Film as Literature

Dr. Gobin TR 12:45-2:00

ENG 315 teaches students to recognize and analyze the narrative, visual, and aural elements of film. To illustrate the breadth of film’s expressive potential, the class will present a variety of film styles (Classic Hollywood, realism, expressionism, Avant garde, and documentary) over the course of the semester and consider how external forces (economics, politics, culture, etc.) shape film aesthetics and reception. We will consider various theories, such as adaptation studies, and critical approaches to the films we will view. In addition to required screenings, there will be a variety of assigned readings.

▾ ENG 345 - Modern Novel

Dr. Penner TR 9:25-10:40

We were full of experiments and reforms.

We were going to do without table napkins, we were to have Bromo instead; we were going to paint; to write; to have coffee after dinner instead of tea at nine o’clock.

Everything was going to be new; everything was going to be different. Everything was on trial.

— Virginia Woolf

The modern novel, whether British or American or postcolonial, takes the conventions of the novel and runs wild with them. Form, perspective, plot, character: all of these elements are challenged and reinvented in the literature of the twentieth century. In this course we will explore the early stages of this reinvention in novels from the modernist period (loosely defined as 1890-1945), and then step out of that heady time to explore the legacies of that movement in the literature of today.

We will focus on the ways that these modern novels play with ways of seeing the world, whether by offering several different viewpoints instead of a single omniscient narrator, showing us the world through the eyes of a child or a person with a disability, suggesting that we read through musical or visual lenses instead of linguistic ones, toying with our inclinations to read for a satisfying ending, or acknowledging the role of coincidence—rather than plot—in bringing individual characters together.

▾ ENG 361 - Adolescent Literature

Dr. Brown TR 2:10-3:25

In ENG 361: Adolescent Lit you will read the ten awesome books listed below. Plus you will choose one additional novel to report on in class. If one or more of the books below is on your all-time favorites list, you already understand why these books are so beloved. Come and find a new favorite to add to your list. If you have not read these works yet, come see what the adolescent lit craze is all about.

This class will appeal to lit majors, film majors, and education majors – as well as anyone who simply loves great writing and great storytelling.

  1. The Hobbit: National Educational Association Top 100 Books
  2. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe: Best Children’s Books of the 20th Century
  3. Hatchet: Newbery Honor, ALA Best of the Best
  4. The Midwife’s Apprentice: Newbery Award, ALA Best Book for Young Adults
  5. Joey Pigza Swallowed the Key: Finalist National Book Award, ALA Notable Book
  6. Harry Potter & the Sorcerer’s Stone: British Book Awards Children's Book of the Year
  7. Holes: Newbery Award, National Book Award
  8. The Hunger Games: PW Best Books for 2008, NY Times Notable Book
  9. The Fault in Our Stars: New York Times bestseller, #1 Amazon bestseller
  10. Flora & Ulysses: Newbery Award, Nation Book Award Longlist

▾ ENG 371 - Intermediate Fiction Writing

Prof. Erny MWF 12:00-12:50

Pre-requisite: English 241 or Approved Portfolio of Creative Work

In Intermediate Fiction you will begin by reviewing and developing your fiction writing skills from English 241, writing new work and workshopping. In the second half of the class, you will be shaping a proto-manuscript—a collection of short stories, a novella or the continuation of a novel—for your final portfolio. As for all creative writing classes, you will attend readings off-campus and give a reading with the other creative classes at the end of the semester.

▾ JRN 390 - Nonfiction Storytelling

Prof. Erny MWF 2:00-2:50

Nonfiction storytelling is a hybrid genre which includes the best of fiction writing, poetic use of language and forms, and the raw material of the real world: our lives, research, and observation.

In Nonfiction Storytelling, we will read a diverse range of essays and forms, engage in discussion of craft and possibility, and we will experiment. You will write many beginnings and carry those beginnings into complete essays via the valuable insight and feedback of your writing community and peers. Reading, writing, discussion, and workshop are the key components of this course.

▾ ENG 431 - Literary Criticism: “Stay Illusion!” Hamlet and the Resistant Reader

Dr. Strait MWF 9:00-9:50

This is a course in the study of literary criticism and theory. We will begin by exploring some of the central contributions from classical literary criticism and philosophy, from Plato’s Republic to Samuel Johnson’s famous Preface to Shakespeare. These texts ask important questions about representation, imagination, fantasy, and madness, the poet/artist and community, literary language and structure, beauty and the sublime, and audience and performance.

After of few weeks of exploring ideas from the classical literary tradition, we will read Shakespeare’s Hamlet in “slow motion,” as resistant readers, who will insist that the language of the play show its face through careful, close readings. “Words, words, words,” as Hamlet says to Polonius in 2.2. We will explore how the powerful language of the play operates in a variety of complex scenes and situations.

The reason for choosing Hamlet is that Shakespeare's play both invites and responds to many critical problems. David Bevington writes that Shakespeare’s “texts are so extraordinarily responsive that new questions put to them—about the changing role of women, about cynicism in the political process, about the protean near-indeterminacy of meaning in language—evoke insights that are hard to duplicate in other literary texts.” Hamlet thrills but also puzzles and disconcerts us precisely along these various lines of critical inquiry.

Literary Criticism is a course required for all English majors; but it is also open to students from all majors interested in the power and possibility of the literary imagination, as well as in questions about social, communicative, and political structures, texts and interpretations, critical reading practices, money, markets and marketplaces, and cultural competences.

▾ ENG 450 - Advanced Creative Writing

Prof. Erny TR 12:45-2:00

In this advanced creative writing class, you will write! You have your chops in your favorite genres, whether fiction, poetry or creative non-fiction. Now is your opportunity to identify, build on and stretch the strengths of your writing. You will continue to experiment with a variety of writing techniques and to explore the oral tradition of literature by hearing professionals read and by reading your own writing aloud.

You will also learn more effective ways to give and receive criticism of your writing and to develop new revision strategies. Because this is the Creative Writing major capstone, you will also learn how to research markets for your writing and how to submit it to magazine and book publishers, while doing the preliminary work toward applying for graduate school and writing jobs.

Class Lists

▾ Fall Even-Numbered Years

  • ENG 200 Introduction to Teaching English as a Second Language (Dupree)
  • ENG 230 Introduction to Literature (Brown)
  • ENG 231 British Literary Traditions I (Gobin)
  • ENG 240 Grammar and Composition for Elementary Teachers (Hamilton)
  • ENG 241 Introduction to Creative Writing-Fiction (Erny)
  • ENG 250 Writing for Teachers (Brown)
  • ENG 261 American Literature I (Penner)
  • ENG 322 Victorian Literature (Penner)
  • ENG 331 Descriptive Linguistics and Advanced Grammar (Brown)
  • ENG 340 Modern Poetry (Gobin)
  • ENG 361 Adolescent Literature (Brown)
  • ENG 371 Intermediate Creative Writing-Fiction (Erny)
  • ENG 375 Renaissance Literature (Strait)
  • ENG 431 Literary Criticism (Strait)
  • ENG 450 Advanced Studies in Creative Writing (Erny)

▾ Spring Odd-Numbered Years

  • ENG 232 British Literary Traditions II (Strait)
  • ENG 241 Introduction to Creative Writing-Fiction (Erny)
  • ENG 242 Introduction to Creative Writing-Poetry (Erny)
  • ENG 262 American Literature II (Penner)
  • ENG 300 Rhetoric for Writers
  • ENG 311 The English Novel (Gobin)
  • ENG 335 Sound Systems of Language (Bruehler)
  • ENG 336 Grammatical Structure of Language (Bruehler)
  • ENG 353 Creative Writing for Young People (Brown)
  • ENG 360 Children's Literature (Erny)
  • ENG 362 American Multi-Ethnic Literature (Penner)
  • ENG 378 Milton and the Seventeenth Century (Strait)
  • ENG 410 Shakespeare (Strait)
  • ENG 475 Senior Seminar (Brown)

▾ Fall Odd-Numbered Years

  • ENG 200 Introduction to Teaching English as a Second Language (Dupree)
  • ENG 230 Introduction to Literature (Brown)
  • ENG 231 British Literary Traditions I (Gobin)
  • ENG 240 Grammar and Composition for Elementary Teachers (Hamilton)
  • ENG 241 Introduction to Creative Writing-Fiction (Erny)
  • ENG 261 American Literature I (Penner)
  • ENG 315 Film as Literature (Gobin)
  • ENG 331 Descriptive Linguistics and Advanced Grammar (Brown)
  • ENG 345 Modern Novel (Penner)
  • ENG 371 Intermediate Creative Writing-Fiction (Erny)
  • ENG 361 Adolescent Literature (Brown)
  • ENG 382 Reason and Revolution: Studies in the Longer Eighteenth Century (Gobin)
  • ENG 431 Literary Criticism (Strait)
  • ENG 450 Advanced Studies in Creative Writing (Erny)

▾ Spring Even-Numbered Years

  • ENG 232 British Literary Traditions II (Strait)
  • ENG 242 Introduction to Creative Writing-Poetry (Erny)
  • ENG 262 American Literature II (Penner)
  • ENG 300 Writing for the Professions
  • ENG 335 Sound Systems of Language (Bruehler)
  • ENG 336 Grammatical Structure of Language (Bruehler)
  • ENG 342 The American Novel (Penner)
  • ENG 348 Contemporary Literature (Gobin)
  • ENG 372 Intermediate Creative Writing--Poetry (Erny)
  • ENG 360 Children's Literature (Erny)
  • ENG 370 Medieval Literature (Strait)
  • ENG 410 Shakespeare (Strait)
  • ENG 423 C.S. Lewis and the Oxford Circle (Brown)
  • ENG 475 Senior Seminar (Brown)