Education Courses

ED 200 (2) Introduction to Education—An introduction to the historical and contemporary dynamics of education in America. Topics of study include the philosophies and theories of education, legal implications, teacher organizations, career opportunities, learning styles relevant to varying cultures, and the significance of participatory democracy.  This introductory course includes opportunities for working with experienced teachers in school classrooms in the area of intended major.  Students enrolled in this course are required to enroll in ED 210 Introduction to Education Practicum concurrently.

 

ED 201 (1) Level I Field Experience— This clinical field experience component is designed to enhance the initial School of Education cluster of courses. It has been designed to give prospective teacher education candidates an opportunity for initial exposure to classrooms in the public schools.  Students will spend 70 clinical/field experience hours in a variety of authentic settings with a structured inquiry work sample project.  A significant portion of this field component is designed to facilitate our students’ ability to work in schools with a high population of P-12 diverse students.

 

ED 220 (2) Technology for Education—Introduction to the concepts of computer usage, productivity tools, and application of the computer for the classroom setting.  Within the course, the student will acquire competency in using productivity tools which include word processing, data base, powerpoint, multimedia (authoring), gradebook applications, and web pages; and will evaluate software and utilize the internet. Instruction of other technologies including television and camcorders for designing and creating instructional materials will be incorporated. Fee

 

ED 225 (1) Assistive Technologies for Special Populations—An array of basic technology skills will be included to facilitate the education of students with disabilities.  Technological experiences will include:  authoring software, interactive electronic presentation device/software and an assistive technology workshop.

 

ED 230 (2) Human Growth and Development—A study of the physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and moral aspects of human development through the life span including birth, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, and their interaction with environmental and cultural influences pertaining to elementary and secondary school teachers. Includes Level I Field Component.

 

ED 274 (3) Social Studies and Science Content in the Elementary Classroom—Provides an overview of the content in science and social studies that elementary teachers need in order to deliver the instruction and assess that content in the K-5 grades.  Candidates will be presented this content through the Kentucky Core Content for Assessment.  This core content will be view as a part of the curriculum of an elementary school program.

 

ED 276 (3) Arts and Humanities and Practical Living/Vocational in the Elementary Classroom--Provides an overview of the content in arts, humanities, and practical living/vocational that teachers need in order to deliver the instruction and assess that content needed in the K-5 grades.  Some of the content included in these areas are music, drama, visual arts, dance, safety, careers, and health.  Candidates will be presented this content through the Kentucky Core content for Assessment in the areas of arts and humanities and practical living/vocational and learn the methodology in these content areas for instructional design and assessment.  This core content will be view as a part of the curriculum of an elementary school program.

 

**NOTE** The following courses all require admission to the Teacher Education Program.

 

ED 301 (1) Level IIA Field Experience- This clinical field experience component is designed to enhance the School of Education’s second cluster of courses. ED 300 provides prospective teacher education candidates an initial opportunity to demonstrate their ability to plan and implement inquiry based instruction with P-12 students. Candidates will spend 70 clinical/field experience hours in variety of authentic settings with a guided inquiry work sample project.  A significant portion of this field component is designed to further facilitate our students’ ability to work in schools with a high population of P-12 diverse students.

 

ED 320 (3) Exceptional Learner in the General Education Classroom—An introduction to the field of special education dealing with the learning needs of exceptional children - those who are gifted and those who have intellectual, emotional, physical, or sensory disabilities.  Course emphasis is on principles and procedures for adapting educational programs to accommodate the needs of these children in the general education classrooms. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.  Includes Level II Field Component.

 

ED 330 (2) Behavioral Intervention of Students with Learning and Behavior Disabilities—Offers principles and techniques for managing the behavior of children and youth with disabilities. Preventive, supportive, and corrective techniques are included. The course focuses on the development of management plans that provide positive behavior supports for P-12 students. Level II Field component required.  Prerequisite: ED 320

 

ED 332 (3) Collaboration and Advocacy for Special Populations—Focuses on collaborative models and appropriate techniques for cooperative working relationships in the school setting. Pertinent legislation and issues of advocacy for the student, parent, and teacher will be explored and applied to current principles for the development of educational programming for students with disabilities. Prerequisite: ED 320.

 

ED 334 (3) Early Childhood Education of Special Populations—Overview of the special needs of young children including the discussions of historical and empirical support for providing early intervention services; assessment, instructional methodologies, family involvement and including children with and without disabilities. Attention will be given to assessing and assisting achievement of cognitive, language, social, and motor skills. Prerequisite: ED 320.

 

ED 338 (3) Introduction to Students with Learning and Behavior Disabilities—The learning, behavioral, and emotional problems of children and youth are explored in the context of theory, etiology, assessment, and practice. Issues of educational programming and community agency support are considered.  Level II Field Component. Prerequisite: ED 320.

 

ED 341 (2) Reading and Language Arts Methods and Materials (P-5)—First course of the two-course reading/language arts sequence. A study of current methods and materials useful in teaching children to read, write, and develop proper language skills. The development of reading and language arts programs and appropriate teaching strategies for the primary school students will be emphasized. Time will be given to unit and lesson plans. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.  Includes Level II Field Component.

 

ED 342 (2) Teaching of Reading (P-5)—Direct approaches to the teaching of reading, including phonics and other word identification techniques as well as comprehension strategies.  Includes Level II Field Component.

 

ED 350 (3) Literacy Assessment (P-5)—An introduction for prospective teachers to methods of language arts assessment. The reading interests and needs of average and exceptional readers are considered, and primary emphasis will focus on the study of current methods and materials useful in analyzing and treating the problems of disabled readers. Time is given to actual in-school diagnosis and remediation of a problem reader that focuses on impact on student learning and culminates in a literacy work sample.  Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and ED 341.  Includes Level II Field Component.

 

ED 360 (2) Social Studies Methods and Materials (P-5)—Exploration of methods, materials, and motivational techniques in teaching social studies at the elementary level. Social studies instructional skills are developed through laboratory experiences. Time is given to unit and lesson plans. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. To be taken concurrently with ED 380.  Includes Level II Field Component.

 

ED 380 (3) Elementary Math and Science Methods—Equips the future elementary teacher with appropriate methods, materials, and motivational techniques for the teaching of math and science.  Students will begin to understand what is the nature of mathematics and science, what are appropriate expectations for learning in elementary math and science, what are exemplary teaching and assessment practices that support math and science programs, and what are available materials and resources for the teaching of math and science. Pre-requisites include: Admission to Teacher Education, MAT 162 & 261.  To be taken concurrently with ED 360.  Includes Level II Field Component

 

ED 385 (3) Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum (Middle School and Secondary Education majors)—Establishes methods and techniques for utilization by Middle and Secondary School Teachers to enhance the reading, composition, and writing skills of their students in whatever discipline they teach.  Includes an overview of the various aspects of the reading process and discusses the specialized demands of reading and portfolio development in the content areas.  Prerequisites: admission to the Teacher Education Program.  Includes Level II Field Component.

 

ED 390 (3) Facilitating EL Student Success—­This course addresses methods of assessment for teaching English Learners (EL) with an emphasis on a systemic assessment process as well as ethical and intercultural sensitivity.  Students will be introduced to criteria to ensure consistent identification of EL students, as well as to determine their eligibility, placement, and duration of programs and services based on English language proficiency assessment.  Candidates will acquire knowledge and skills related to language proficiency assessments that are linked to the new common curriculum, appropriate standardized assessments, and formative and summative assessments used for English Learners.  Candidates will be prepared to analyze assessment results to create intervention plans and to design instruction and monitor progress for English Learners.

 

ED 393 (3) Seminar—Seminars, cross-cultural experiences and special extended field experiences supervised by faculty, with appropriate reading and assessment.

 

ED 395 (1-3) Extended Field Experience—This course extends the field experiences currently integrated within each of the education majors. It will (a) assist the student to connect theory & practice; (b) provide a sense of flow and schedule for a typical school day; (c) enable in-depth and extended interaction with classroom teachers and students, and (d) help the student apply content from methods classes in lesson planning & teaching. Students are involved in planning for and implementing lessons for both small and whole group instruction.  This course also enables candidates who desire additional experiences in urban settings or with students who have diverse learning needs to have those opportunities.  Credit/No Credit.  Contract.

 

ED 400 (1) Practicum:  Level II Field component (For Elementary Only)—Course intends to (a) help the student connect theory & practice; (b) provide a sense of flow for a typical school day; (c) enable in-depth interaction with classroom teachers and students, and (d) help the student apply content from methods classes in lesson planning & teaching. Students are involved in planning for and implementing instructions for both small group and whole class lessons.  Co-requisite with Elementary Methods Block courses.  Level II Field Component for elementary only.

 

ED 401 (1) Clinical Field Experience Level IIB—This clinical field experience component is designed to enhance the School of Education’s third cluster of courses. ED 400 gives teacher education candidates a culminating opportunity to demonstrate their ability to plan, implement, assess, and analyze the inquiry based instruction that they have delivered prior to their student teaching experience.  Students will spend 70 clinical/field experience hours in variety of authentic settings with an open inquiry work sample project.  A significant portion of this field component is designed to further facilitate our candidates’ ability to work in schools with a high population of P-12 diverse students.  [Beginning Fall 2011]

 

ED 405 (3) Learning Performance and Assessment—Designed to examine classical learning theories of motivation and cognitive development of human behavior. Future teachers will be trained to interpret the results of standardized achievement tests, create performance-based assessment items, develop teacher-made tests which take into account a student's individual approaches to learning, and analyze the impact on student learning.  An assessment work sample which incorporates a skill set of instructional design, standard-based, unit planning, integration of formative and summative assessment measuring analysis of student learning is a requirement for the course.  Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.

 

ED 410 (2) Classroom Management—Examination of basic discipline technologies for students.  Course emphases will include practical application of effective classroom environments, appropriate selection of management technologies for behavioral remediation, effective teaching styles and teacher behavior, efficient observation and conferencing skills.  Course to be taken prior to student teaching.  Note: The fall semester course focuses on management in the Elementary school, and the spring semester course focuses on management in the middle and secondary school.

 

ED 415 (3) Assessment for Special Education—This course provides instruction on the various forms of assessment used by a special educator including; administration of standardized individual achievement assessments, techniques for monitoring student progress and IEP benchmarks and various forms of curriculum-based measures.  To demonstrate test administration, interpretation and data analysis of curriculum-based measures, candidates will complete a clinical work sample.  Level II Field Component.  Prerequisites:  ED 320, 330, 338.

 

ED 416 (3) Methods for Special Populations—This course focuses on direct instruction and student-oriented methodologies for students with mild disabilities.  Emphasis will be placed on metacognitive strategies, appropriate and non-intrusive accommodations, and seamless transitions for collaborative and inclusive settings.  Instructional methodologies that support student achievement in the general core knowledge will be included.  An instructional work sample will provide evidence of the candidate’s competence in designing and accommodating instruction.  Level II Field Component.  Prerequisites:  ED 320, 330, 338.

 

ED 418 (3) Teaching English as a Second Language Methods and Culture—Addresses current methods and materials for teaching English as a Second Language with a particular emphasis on culturally responsive instruction.  Focuses on theory made practical with a strong emphasis on ethical and intercultural sensitivity.  Includes practicum experiences to ensure classroom confidence and success.  Level II Field Component.

 

ED 420 (3) Secondary/P-12 Methods Courses by Subject: Biological Science, Chemistry, English, World Language, Mathematics, and Social Studies—The study of methods and materials used in current education and to develop skills in relating these to the teaching-learning process. Aims and objectives for teaching a specific discipline are included as well as courses of study, unit and lesson plans, assessment, and use of equipment. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program, ED 385, FRN 410, LAT 410, or SPN 410.  Level II Field Component.

 

ED 421 (3) Art Methods and Materials (P-12)—A study of visual art for elementary and secondary students. This course includes art fundamentals review, planning for students development in cognitive skills, processes and avenues to art appreciation, and hands-on experience working with various media, methods and materials. Each student presents two lessons with lesson plans; also classroom visitation to area schools for observation and participation is part of the criteria.  Learning of classroom management, such as ordering supplies and equipment, is dealt with. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.  Level II Field Component.  Alternate years.  Fee.

 

ED 422 (3) Instruction for Teaching Physical Education and Health (P-12)—An introduction to methods and materials used in current education and to develop skills in relating these to the teaching-learning process. Aims and objectives for teaching each discipline include unit and lesson plans, assessment, and use of equipment.  Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.  Level II Field Component.

 

ED 425 (3) Middle School Curriculum and Methodologies—Focuses on curriculum concepts and teaching strategies for students in the middle grades. Attention will be given to the philosophy and educational structure appropriate for the middle grades. Methods and materials related to particular academic emphases will be provided. Time is given to unit and lesson plans.  Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and ED 385.  Level II Field Component.

 

ED 428 (2) Interventions for DifferentiationThe course focus is the teacher’s role in creating collaborative structures that provide interventions to ensure the learning for each child.  Candidates will analyze Response to Intervention (RTI) for students, as well as analyze and assess effective collaboration models for English Learners (EL) and students with exceptionalities.   To ensure the needs of all students can be met in the regular education classrooms, students will acquire an understanding of language acquisition theories and research based practices for English Learners.

 

STUDENT TEACHING

Prerequisite for student teaching courses:  Admission to the Teacher Education program and completion of Gate 3 requirements (Admission to Student Teaching).  Student must have a minimum 2.75 g.p.a. in all coursework (cumulative), the teaching major, and in the professional core.

 

ED 430, 435, 440, 450, 455, 460, 465, 470, 475, 480 Student Teaching:  Level III Clinical Component—Within the professional semester, there will be four components to support and guide the beginning educator.  The first component, “Leadership for Family/School/Community Relations,” focuses on culturally-responsive leadership to embrace the richness of the diverse multicultural heritage of today’s society. The second component, “Student Teaching Camp,” focuses on teaching objectives, classroom procedures, motivation techniques and legal implications for classroom teachers. Successful completion of Components I and II is a prerequisite for the full-time assignment of student teaching.  Component III, “Integration and Reflection Forums,” are bi-weekly seminars to focus on practical insights gained through authentic learning during student teaching.  The student teaching portion (Component IV) of this professional semester involves 13 weeks of full-time assignment in a local school to observe, to participate, and to teach in classroom settings with a special emphasis on the impact of student learning. Successful completion of all components is necessary for degree completion.

ED 430, 435 (6 each) Student Teaching Elementary:  Level III Clinical Component—During the first two weeks of the semester, students will meet in a seminar to focus on teaching objectives, classroom procedures, motivation techniques, and legal implications for classroom teachers.  Opportunities will be given for pre-placement conferences with cooperating teachers and observation. Each student will then be assigned full time for 13 weeks in a local school to observe, to participate, and to teach in classroom activities, which will include assessment, counseling, organizing materials, and participating in other professional activities.  Placements will be made in two non-adjacent grade levels (grades P-5); each will be six weeks in length.

 

ED 440 (12) Student Teaching Elementary:  Level III Clinical Component—During the first two weeks of the semester, students will meet in a full-day seminar to focus on teaching objectives, classroom procedures, motivation techniques, and legal implications for classroom teachers.  Opportunities will be given for pre-placement conferences with cooperating teachers and observation.  Each student will then be assigned full time for twelve weeks in a local school to observe, to participate, and to teach in classroom activities, which will include assessment, counseling, organizing materials, and participating in other professional activities.  Placements will be made in a primary block setting, primary levels P1-P4, which includes the grade levels of P-3.  Placements will be made in one setting grades P-5.

 

ED 450, 455 (6 each) Student Teaching Middle School:  Level III Clinical Component—Course description and requirements are the same as for ED 430 with the exception that the placement may be a twelve-week continuous placement in two subject areas or two six-week single subject placements (5-9).  Prerequisites: same as ED 430.

 

ED 460, 465 (6 each) Student Teaching P - 12:  Level III Clinical Component—Course description and requirements are the same as for ED 430 with the exception that the placement will be two six-week subject placements (P-5 and 5-12). Prerequisites: same as ED 430.

 

ED 470 (6 or 12) Student Teaching Secondary:  Level III Clinical Component—Course description and requirements are the same as for ED 430 with the exception that the placement will be a twelve-week continuous placement in a high school (8-12). Prerequisites: same as ED 430.

 

ED 475 (6) Student Teaching Special Education:  Level III Clinical Component—Course descriptions and requirements are the same as for ED 430 with the exception that the placement will be a six-week experience in special education.  Prerequisites:  same as ED 430

 

ED 480 (6) Student Teaching Special Education:  Level III Clinical Component—Placement will be a six week placement in special education.  The other six-week placement will occur in elementary, middle, or secondary. 

 

ED 999 (12) Supervised Student Teaching—Used as a code for advance registration for the professional semester.

 GEOGRAPHY COURSE

 GEO 211 (3) Principles of Geography—A study of geography using primarily a balanced approach between physical and cultural geography, designed primarily for the elementary and middle school teacher and for the concentration in the social studies emphasis.