Asbury University Course Catalog

2014 Asbury University Course Catalog PDF

2013 Course Catalog PDF archived

2012 Course Catalog PDF archived

 

2014-2015 COURSES

Undergraduate Courses | Graduate Courses 

 

COMMON COURSE NUMBERS WHICH MAY BE USED ACROSS DEPARTMENTS

___293/593 Seminar Course (1 – 6)  Sophomore level, or beginning master’s level, non-regular course offered occasionally which covers topics selected by the department. 

___391/491/691 Independent Study (0.5 – 6)  individualized study of a topic of interest beyond the content of regular course offerings, involving a minimum of 1 – 3 meetings with instructor during semester.  Available to Juniors or above. Contract required.

___392/492/692 Directed Study (0.5 – 6)  is a faculty directed individualized offering of a regular course not available in a semester, or an individualized course on a topic of interest beyond the content of regular course offerings, involving a minimum of 50 minutes per week with instructor during semester.  Available to Juniors or above. Contract required.

___393/693 Seminar Course (1 – 6)  Junior level or above, or upper masters level, non-regular course offered occasionally which covers topics selected by the department. 

___435/635 Internship (0.5 – 9)  Course and grade based on time spent in practical experience; required in several major and minor programs.  Contract required.

 

 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSE CATALOG

Listed alphabetically by prefix code

ACCOUNTING 

ACC 100 (3) Fundamentals of Accounting— This is a survey course for non-business majors covering the fundamentals of financial and managerial accounting.  Students will learn how to read financial statements and conduct basic financial analysis.

ACC/ACA 201 (3) Financial Accounting— An introduction to the basic structure and language of accounting used in business.  The three major types of business entities are considered with emphasis on preparing and understanding financial documents for sole proprietorships and corporations.  Internal controls and ethical challenges in relation to financial management and reporting will also be explored.

ACC/ACA 202 (3) Managerial Accounting— This course utilizes the language and preparatory skills learned in Financial Accounting to analyze the information for decision making as investors, managers, employees and creditors. The concept of “cost” will be explored extensively in understanding how it is accounted for in manufacturing environments as well as the role that it plays in pricing and analysis. Pre-requisite: ACC/ACA 201.

ACC 301, 302 (3 each) Intermediate Accounting—Accounting theory and practice in relation to professional preparation. An in‑depth study of cash, receivables, investments, revenue recognition, pensions, leases and cash flow statements, interpretation of financial statements and disclosure. Professional pronouncements and literature are considered. Pre-requisites: ACC 202 for ACC 301 and ACC 301 for ACC 302

ACC 305 (3) Cost Accounting—Product costing, overhead cost analysis, standard costs, variance analysis, contribution accounting, flexible budgeting, responsibility accounting. Pre-requisite: ACC 202.

ACC 307 (3) Principles of Federal Income Tax Accounting—Basic concepts, applicable to all taxpayers, of tax management, exempt income, nondeductible items, corporate distributions, computations of income, realization and recognition of incomes and deductions. Pre-requisite: ACC 202 or permission of professor.

ACC 309 (3) Accounting for Nonprofit Entities—The requirements of adequate accounting systems for various government units (city, welfare), religious organizations, hospitals, including the recording of usual transactions and the form and content of reports. Pre-requisite: ACC 202 or permission of professor.

ACC 361 (3) Management Information Systems—Theory and design of information systems from a managerial perspective.  This course provides an understanding of the role of information technology in business and how it can be used for competitive advantage.  Topics include information technology (data base, networks, etc.), developing applications and managing with information (e.g. decision support systems and expert systems). Pre-requisite: BM/BU 211.

ACC 391 (1-3) Independent Study—Independent study projects with required written reports approved and directed by a member of the accounting faculty. Contract.

ACC 393 (3) Seminar—Study of various issues that are relevant to the current accounting industry environment.  Topics to be determined.  (on occasion)

ACC 401 (3) Advanced Accounting—Selected topics in advanced accounting, including study of unique problems related to special sales arrangements, business combinations, and consolidated financial statements. Pre-requisite: ACC 302.

ACC 402 (3) Basic Auditing—A course in auditing theory practice. Auditing standards, procedures, rules of professional conduct, and related materials of professional importance. Consideration is also given to internal auditing. Pre-requisite: ACC 302 or permission of professor.

ACC 435 (3) Internship- Students are placed with cooperating firms for on‑the‑job training in business and accounting. Written reports to be submitted by the firm and by the student to the professor. This is an option for the student and will be tailored to fit the student's needs as far as possible.  Consent of the instructor must be secured. Contract.

AIR FORCE ROTC [AFFILIATE COURSES]

AFS 111 (1) AEROSPACE STUDIES I—A course designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the nature and principles of war, national power, and the Department of Defense role in the organization of national security. The student also develops leadership abilities by participating in a military organization, the cadet corps, which offers a wide variety of situations demanding effective leadership.

AFS 112 (1) LEADERSHIP LABORATORY I— A course designed for development of basic skills required to be a manager, including communications, human relations, and administration of equal opportunity. Pass/Fail only. Coreq: AFS 111.

AFS 113 (1) AEROSPACE STUDIES I— A course designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the contribution of aerospace power to the total U.S. strategic offensive and defensive military posture. The student also develops leadership abilities by participating in a military organization, the cadet corps, which offers a wide variety of situations demanding effective leadership. Pre-requisite: AFS 111.

AFS 114 (1) LEADERSHIP LABORATORY I— A continuation of AFS 113. A course designed to develop managerial skills including superior/subordinate relationships, communications, customs and courtesies, basic drill movements and career progression requirements. Pass/Fail only. Coreq: AFS 113.

AFS 211 (1) AEROSPACE STUDIES II— Introduces the study of air power from a historical perspective; focuses on the development of air power into a primary element of national security. Leadership experience is continued through active participation in the cadet corps. Lecture, one hour; leadership laboratory, one hour. Pre-requisite: AFS 111, 113 or PAS approval.

AFS 212 (1) LEADERSHIP LABORATORY II— A course designed for development of advanced skills required to be a manager/leader, including leadership styles, public speaking, group dynamics, motivation and preparation for field training.. Pass/Fail only. Coreq: AFS 211.

AFS 213 (1) AEROSPACE STUDIES II— Provides a foundation for understanding how air power has been employed in military and non-military operations to support national objectives. Examines the changing mission of the defense establishment, with particular emphasis on the United States Air Force.  Leadership experience is continued through participation in the cadet corps. Lecture, one hour; leadership laboratory, one hour per week. Pre-requisite: AFS 111, 113 or PAS approval.

AFS 214 (1) LEADERSHIP LABORATORY II— A continuation of AFS 213. A course designed to develop supervisory management skills to include communications, techniques of critique, social actions, personnel evaluation procedures, problem solving, role playing and field training preparation. Pass/Fail only. Coreq: AFS 213.

AFS 311 (3) AEROSPACE STUDIES III— A study of management functions with emphasis on the individual as a manager in an Air Force environment. Individual motivational and behavioral process, communication, and group dynamics are included to provide a foundation for the development of professional skills as an Air Force Officer. Students refine their leadership and managerial abilities by organizing and managing a quasi-military unit.  Satisfies PED 100 requirement.  Pre-requisite: Acceptance into POC or approval of PAS.

AFS 312 (1) LEADERSHIP LABORATORY IIIA —A course designed and focused on developing advanced leadership skills. Students fill the mid-level management function within the cadet corps. The course involves the planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps, and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other written and oral communications. Pass/Fail only. Coreq: AFS 311.

AFS 313 (3) AEROSPACE STUDIES III —A study of leadership with specific emphasis on the Air Force leader. Includes theoretical, professional and communicative aspects.  In addition, military justice and administrative law are discussed within the context of the military organization. Students continue to develop and refine their leadership abilities by organizing and managing a military unit, the cadet corps, which offers a wide variety of situations requiring effective leadership. Pre-requisite: AFS 311.

AFS 314 (1) LEADERSHIP LABORATORY III— Laboratory to accompany AFS 313. Pass/Fail only. Coreq: AFS 313.

AFS 411 (3) AEROSPACE STUDIES IVA — A study of the military profession, civil-military interaction, communicative skills, framework of defense policy, and formulation of defense strategy. Students refine their leadership abilities by organizing and managing a military unit, the cadet corps, which offers a wide variety of situations requiring effective leadership. Pre-requisite: AFS 313, or approval of PAS.

AFS 412 (1) LEADERSHIP LABORATORY IVA — A course designed and focused on developing advanced leadership skills. Students fill the top level management function within the cadet corps. The course involves the planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps, and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other written and oral communications. The lab also includes practice of leadership techniques aimed at motivating and instructing cadets in the lower three levels. Pass/Fail only. Laboratory, two hours per week. Coreq: AFS 411.

AFS 413 (3) AEROSPACE STUDIES IVB— Continues the study of strategy and the management of conflict, formulation and implementation of U.S. defense policy, defense organization, and case studies in defense policy making. Students also refine their leadership abilities by organizing and managing a military unit, the cadet corps, which offers a wide variety of situations requiring effective leadership. Pre-requisite: AFS 411 or approval of PAS.

AFS 414 (1) LEADERSHIP LABORATORY IVB— A continuation of AFS 412. A course designed and focused on developing advanced leadership skills. Students fill the top level management function within the cadet corps. The course involves the planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps, and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other written and oral communications. The lab also includes practice of leadership techniques aimed at motivating and instructing cadets in the lower three levels. Pass/Fail only. Laboratory, two hours per week. Coreq: AFS 413.

AFS 999 (0) AIR FORCE ROTC—Denotes students officially in the Air Force ROTC program.

ARMY ROTC [AFFILIATE COURSES]

AMS 101 (2) INTRODUCTION TO THE ARMY —This introductory level course is designed to give students an appreciation for the role the Army currently plays in our society. The course covers the history of the Army and the roles and relationships of the Army within our society. The course also covers some of the basic skills necessary for today’s leaders to include oral presentation, time management, map reading, basic rifle marksmanship and squad tactics.

AMS 102 (2) INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP— This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental skills necessary to be a leader, both in military and civilian context.  Course also covers basic military map reading skills.

AMS 201 (2) AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY — Study of the development of the U.S. from a military perspective. Pre-parallel development of technology and warfare; and emphasis on the evaluation of military leadership from the historically tested principles of warfare from the Civil War to the present.

AMS 202 (2) EFFECTIVE MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS— This course provides instruction and practical experience in the art of speaking and writing in the Army style. Students will demonstrate competency through a series of oral presentations and writing assignments. Small unit tactics and map reading skills will also be used in the implementation of the oral presentations.

AMS 211 (2) ADVANCED LEADERSHIP I— This course focuses on both theoretical and practical aspects of leadership. Students will examine topics such as written and oral communication, effective listening, assertiveness, personality, adult development, motivation, and organizational culture and change.  Pre-requisite: AMS 101 and 102, or consent of instructor.

AMS 212(2)  ADVANCED LEADERSHIP II — This course focuses principally on officership, providing an extensive examination of the unique purpose, roles, and obligations of commissioned officers. It includes a detailed investigation of the origin or our institutional values and their practical application in decision making and leadership. Pre-requisite: AMS 101, 102 and 211, or consent of the instructor.

AMS 250 (1) BASIC MILITARY SCIENCE LAB— A hands-on practicum which exposes the student to the military skills required for basic technical and tactical competence to enter the Advanced Course. Laboratory, two hours per week and two week-end exercises. May be repeated to a maximum of four credits.

AMS 301 (3) LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT I —Course of study in development of basic skills required to function as a manager; study of leadership styles, group dynamics, communications, motivation and military instruction methods; and school of the soldier and exercise of command. Satisfies PED 100 requirement. Pre-requisite: AMS 101, 102 graduate or undergraduate student (male or female), successful completion of basic course or basic camp, physically fit to pursue program;  consent of PMS.

AMS 302 (3)  ADVANCED TACTICS— Small unit tactics and communications, organization and mission of combat arms units; leadership and the exercise of command. Pre-requisite: AMS 101, 102, graduate or undergraduate student (male or female), successful completion of basic course or basic camp, physically fit to pursue program; consent of PMS.

AMS 320 (3)ADVANCED STUDIES IN AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY — This course will furnish upper level UK ROTC Cadets, and qualified History majors or minors with the methodological tools and materials needed to gain a more detailed understanding of American Military History and to put together a major research paper. AMS 320 will emphasize basic research skills: understanding historiographical debates within a military framework, developing effective note taking, outlining techniques, picking a feasible research topic, finding useful primary sources and drawing inferences from them, examining American military campaigns and leaders in order to complete a battle analysis, and short research assignments. Pre-requisite: Consent of instructor. 

AMS 341(3) LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT II— An advanced study of logistics, operations, military administrations, personnel management, military justice, world change and military implications, service orientation and leadership training. Pre-requisite: AMS 301, 302.

AMS 342 (3) COMMAND MANAGEMENT— An advanced study of logistics, operations, military administration, personnel management, military justice, world change and military implications, service orientation and leadership training. Pre-requisite: AMS 301, 302.

AMS 350 (1) ADVANCED MILITARY SCIENCE LAB— A hands-on practicum which exposes the student to the military skills required for advanced technical and tactical competence as an Army officer. The course affords junior and senior cadets opportunities to develop and refine their leadership style and abilities under differing constraints and environments. Laboratory, two hours per week and two weekend exercises. May be repeated to a maximum of four credits. Pre-requisite: AMS 101, AMS 201 AMS 202, and AMS 250. Concurrent: AMS 301, 302, 341 or 342.

AMS 999 (0) Army ROTC— Denotes students officially in the Army ROTC program.

ART

ART 100 (3) Understanding Art—Exposure to elements, principles and periods in art. Studio components, visiting artists, regional museum and gallery visits an integral part of the course. Fee.

ART 111 (3) Introduction to 2D Form and Design—The introduction to the fundamental principles and elements of two-dimensional design and the technical skills required to apply them in various media.  The student learns how to structure intelligent and creative solutions to specific design problems and to evaluate those solutions according to critical standards.  The nature and meaning of the creative process and the expressive potential of visual form are addressed. Fee.

ART 112 (3) Introduction to 3D Form and Design—Explores spatial principles through a series of projects involving concept generation, technical construction, and expressive intent with a variety of materials. Fee.

ART 123 (3) Introduction to Drawing—An introduction to drawing as a means of seeing and formulating ideas in visual form. Explores the basic concepts and formal devices of drawing.  Working in various drawing media builds a practical understanding of drawing as the foundation for all visual thinking.  Three hours of laboratory per week. Fee.

ART 212 (3) Stained Glass—Five works in stained glass using mosaic, copper foil, and lead construction.  Concern for good design and construction.  Three hours of laboratory per week required. Fee.

ART 222 (3) Ceramics—An introduction to the complete ceramics process.  Techniques in clay formation, decoration, firing, and potter's wheel are taught with an emphasis on the expressive potential of utility.  Three hours of laboratory per week required. Fee.

ART 231 (3) Intermediate Design and Color Theory—Further exploration of the principles and elements of design.  Develops awareness of the theoretical and expressive significance of color in pictorial space. Pre-requisite: ART 111. Fee.

ART 233 (3) Figure Drawing—Further develops lessons introduced in ART 123 by addressing the classical subject of the live model in an intensive studio context.  Various media.  Three hours of laboratory per week required. Pre-requisite:  ART 123. Fee.

ART 242 (3) Watercolor—Introduces the basic techniques of traditional watercolor.  While the emphasis is on the handling of the media, principles of form and composition are also addressed. Fee. (alternate years)

ART 251 (3) Art History Survey IExamination of major developments in art and architecture from prehistory through the 14th century, with consideration given to the dominant political, religious, and social concerns of each period. Fee.

ART 252 (3) Art History Survey IIBroad survey of the principal innovations in art and architecture in the West from the Renaissance to the present. Fee.

ART 266 (3) Photography I—Introduction to seeing photographically.  Emphasizes critical thinking, photography’s history and thoughtful evaluation of photographs.  Methods and practice are also covered, including equipment, history, basic digital imaging, and presentation, culminating in a final portfolio. Requires an SLR camera (film or digital) with manual functions.  Fee.

ART 292 (3) Working In The Visual Arts— Prepares student for advanced study in their chosen emphasis.  Combines faculty mentorship with a chance to learn the principles and practice of presenting, exhibiting, curating, and documenting artwork.  Students learn to identify areas of interest and begin the process of self-propelled art creation and/or research.  Ideally taken in sophomore year.   Fee.

ART 300 (3) Art Theory and Criticism—Historical survey of critical methods and theories by which “art” and the “artist” have been defined and assessed.  Theological perspectives on the visual arts are addressed.  Fee.

ART 322 (3) Ceramics II—Intermediate studio course building on the foundations on Ceramics I.  Design, concept development, sculptural application and surface considerations will be explored.  Emphasis on contemporary ceramic practices and the development of one’s own creative expression within the medium.  Pre-requisite: ART 222.  Fee.

ART 340 (3) Photography II: Black & White Craft—Intermediate studio course that introduces black and white darkroom craft as a form of artistic expression.  Students are given opportunities to learn traditional silver-based light sensitive processes and darkroom techniques, as well as experience using medium- and large-format camera equipment.  Studio lighting techniques are also covered.  Students will practice articulating pertinent conversations and concerns surrounding the medium from the early twentieth century to present times. Pre-requisite:  ART 266.  Fee.

ART 354 (3) Graphic Design I—Fundamental design principles within the context of graphic design, using industry-standard page-layout and digital image-editing software.  Two-dimensional visual communication is reinforced, along with typographic principles and a survey of graphic design processes, through problem solving projects and exercises. Fee.

ART 372 (3) Sculpture—Investigation of the major issues and techniques of contemporary sculptural practice including materials choice, formation process, and idea development.  Three hours of laboratory per week required.  Pre-requisite: ART 112.  Fee.

ART 381 (3) Painting—This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of representational painting in acrylics, oils, and egg tempera.  The emphasis lies in developing technical proficiency and visual acuity as the foundation for imaginative formal expression in paint.  Three hours of laboratory per week required.  Pre-requisite: ART 123 or ART 111 or permission of instructor.  Fee.

ART 390 (3) Printmaking—Students learn the procedures, techniques, and vocabulary of intaglio, relief, serigraphy, and lithography printmaking processes.  Three hours of laboratory per week required.  Pre-requisite: ART 123.  Fee.

ART 392 (1-3) Directed Study (non-majors)—Independent work in a field chosen in consultation with the supervising professor. Repeatable. Pre-requisite: 12 hours in ART.  Fee.  Contract.

ART 394 (3) Summer Seminar Abroad —Summer Seminar immersed in art and history of France, or another destination as specified by Art Department.  Fee.

ART 396 (1) Contemporary Art Seminar—Students engage the ideas, practices and broader context of art produced today.  The course includes viewing art, research and discussion of current art exhibitions and publications. Repeatable. Fee. 

ART 403 (3) Advanced Painting and Drawing—This studio course continues the practice, study, and craft of both drawing and painting laid out by ART 381 and ART 233 with additional attention given to research skills and focused expression of the disciplines through a studio classroom setting.  Course will prepare the student for either painting or drawing directed studies, depending on student’s choice of emphasis.  Pre-requisites: ART 231, 233, and 381.  Fee. 

ART 406 (3) Photography III: Digital Imaging—Covers digital imaging techniques, principles and critical analysis.  This course is designed to prepare the student for both commercial and fine arts applications.  Various methods, tools and techniques of digital imaging and efficient post-production workflow are covered, along with editing, manipulation, file management and preparation, scanning, printing, and an array of expressive options and current trends.  Access to DSLR required.  Pre-requisite: ART 266.  Fee. 

ART 435 (3) Internship—Students work under joint supervision of professor and on-the-job supervisor in appropriate setting.  Requires prior approval of work setting, and minimum of 120 hours of documented field work. Pre-requisites: junior standing and departmental approval.  Fee.  Contract

ART 452 (3) Graphic Design II—-Builds on ART 354 in considering critical analyses in graphic design and its larger cultural impact.  Introduces vector graphics software and further study of page layout and digital image-editing tools.  Pre-requisite: ART 354.  Fee.

ART 454 (3) Renaissance Art—Examination of developments in art from the 13th through the 17th centuries, both in Italy and north of the Alps.  In addition to Renaissance art, challenges to traditional conceptions of classical beauty found in Baroque art will be examined as well.  Pre-requisites: junior standing and departmental approval.  Fee.  (alternate years)

ART 455 (3) 20th Century Art—Exploration of developments in modern art with particular attention to the ways in which trends in modern art may be considered expressions of historical conditions and ideologies.  Pre-requisites: junior standing and departmental approval.  Fee.  (alternate years)

ART 475 (1) Senior Seminar—Capstone Seminar dealing with what it means to have a liberal arts degree in Art, as well as making plans for relevant graduate education and career opportunities.  Senior Seminar is normally taken in the fall semester of the year in which the student will carry out their senior exhibit, or senior art historical research.  Pre-requisite: senior status. Fee.

ART 476 (3) Senior Exhibit Directed Study—--Specialization in chosen discipline (painting, sculpture, photography, ceramics, drawing, graphic design, or art history) in consultation with professor. This course is the final Directed Study an Art Major will complete and supports the creation of artwork or research culminating in the Senior Exhibit/Presentation.  Pre-requisites: completion of ART 492 as required by chosen area of specialization. Co-requisites: ART 477. Contract. Fee.

ART 477 (3) Senior Exhibit/Art History Presentation—A student in studio art mounts a professional-quality exhibition of a body of work created for the Art major in the University gallery or other designated space.  The exhibit must meet faculty approval both as proposed and as installed.  The student completing an art history emphasis presents research at the public annual art history symposium or independently curates a show on or off campus.  Prerequisite:  senior status and recommendation of department following junior review.  Co-requisite: ART 476.  Fee.

ART 492 (1-3) Directed Study—Specialization in chosen discipline (painting, sculpture, photography, ceramics, drawing, graphic design, or art history) in consultation with professor. Pre-requisites: Introductory level course in chosen area of specialization. Repeatable. Fee. Contract.

BIOLOGY 

BIO 100 (3) Biological Science—Specifically designed, in conjunction with BIO 101, to satisfy the natural science foundational requirement for non-science majors. Emphasis is placed on the nature, methodology, and limitations of biological scientific investigation, as well as on selected topics relevant to humans, including cell biology, genetics, evolution, and ecology.  Co-requisite: BIO 101. 

BIO 101 (1) Biological Science Lab—In conjunction with BIO 100, satisfies the natural science foundational requirement for non-science majors.  Emphasis is placed on using the methodologies of science for problem solving, and on distinguishing among pure, applied, and technological aspects of biological science.  Specific labs highlight concepts presented in BIO 100 and cover cell biology, genetics, evolution, and ecology.  Three-hour lab per week.  Co-requisite: BIO 100.  Fee.

BIO 201 (3) General Biology I—First course in a one-year sequence designed to be taken by students majoring or minoring in biology or biochemistry.  Included is coverage of cell biology, ecology, genetics, and evolution. Philosophy and methodology of science will also be treated from a Christian point of view. High school biology and chemistry are assumed. Three hours lecture per week.  Co-requisite: BIO 203.

BIO 202 (3) General Biology II—Second course in a one-year sequence designed for students majoring or minoring in biology or biochemistry.  Emphasizes biological classification and organismal biology, including a survey of plant and animal organ systems.  Three hours lecture per week.  Co-requisite: BIO 204.

BIO 203 (1) General Biology Lab I—In conjunction with BIO 201, satisfies the foundational requirement for a natural science.  Emphasis is placed on using the methodologies and tools of science.  Developing computer and research report writing skills are integral to the course.  Subject matter parallels BIO 201 and includes labs on ecology, cell biology, genetics, and evolution.  Three-hour lab per week.  Co-requisite: BIO 201.  Fee.

BIO 204 (1) General Biology Lab II— In conjunction with BIO 202, satisfies the foundational requirement for a natural science.  A variety of laboratory techniques, including microscopic observation, dissection, and computer data analysis will be used to investigate the biological systems of organisms within the five kingdoms of classification.  Three-hour lab per week.  Co-requisite: BIO 202.  Fee.

BIO 211 (3) Microbiology—A comprehensive study of the microbial worlds. Bacterial structure, reproduction, and growth are described. Emphasis is placed on microbial-related disease processes, microbial control and identification of common and medically-important bacteria and parasites. Also includes discussion of microbial genetics and virus replication.  In conjunction with BIO 213, satisfies the foundational requirement for a natural science. Three hours lecture per week. Co-requisite: BIO 213.

BIO 213 (1) Microbiology Lab—Introduces students to the basic microbiological techniques used in the laboratory for the isolation, growth and/or identification of medically important bacteria, fungi and parasites.  Special emphasis is placed on identifying "unknown" microbes, utilizing various morphological and biochemical tests.  Experimental data is obtained to study the effects of selected physical and chemical factors on bacterial growth.  Two 75-minute labs per week.  Co-requisite: BIO 211.  Fee.

BIO 217 (3) Environmental Science—Provides a sound foundation in basic principles and unifying concepts of environmental science.  Current environmental issues are also covered, with emphasis on the ecological, economic, and human health impacts of air and water pollution, global climate change, ozone depletion, acid rain, hazardous and solid waste, alternative energy resources, soils, deforestation, overfishing, biodiversity, and endangered species.  Intended both for biology majors and non-biology majors. Three hours lecture per week.  Co-requisite: BIO 219.

BIO 219 (1) Environmental Science Lab—Applies ecological principles to current environmental problems using experimental and statistical analysis techniques.  Exercises are carried out in the lab and in the field. Topics include energy production, consumption, and conservation, soil, air, and water quality testing, and human impacts on plant and animal populations. In conjunction with BIO 217, satisfies the foundational requirement for a natural science.   Three-hour lab per week.  Co-requisite: BIO 217.  Fee.

BIO 221 (3) Ecology—Presents the theoretical basis for modern ecology: laws of thermodynamics, population  dynamics, evolutionary adaptation, the earth's weather machine, physiological ecology, marine ecology, and nutrient cycling.  Three hours lecture per week.  Pre-requisites: BIO 201/203, BIO 202/204.  Co-requisite: BIO 223.

BIO 223 (1) Ecology Lab—Provides practical learning experiences in major ecological principles.  Exercises are conducted both in the field and the laboratory.  Topics include population dynamics, community structure and dynamics, biodiversity, soils, and behavior.  Collection and evaluation of data are important components of the course.  Three hour lab per week.  Co-requisite: BIO 221.  Fee.

BIO 227 (3) Aquatic & Wetland Biology— Provides an overview of the biology and ecology of aquatic systems with an emphasis on the diversity and taxonomy of organisms residing in these habitats.  The processes dictating the characteristics of freshwater ecosystems (energy flow, nutrient flow, movement of water) are examined as well as the impact of anthropogenic perturbations on these processes. Additional topics discussed in the course include constructed wetlands, aquatic toxicology, infectious aquatic microorganisms and their control, trophic states, and extreme aquatic environments.  Students exit the course with a strong foundation in the many facets of aquatic biology and familiarity with aquatic flora and fauna.  Three hours lecture per week.   Pre-requisites: BIO 201/203.  Co-requisite: BIO 229 

BIO 229 (1) Aquatic & Wetland Biology Lab— Emphasizes taxonomy of freshwater aquatic and wetland species with a focus on Kentucky fauna.  Methods used in aquatic biology play a central role in the course and students practice these techniques in the field.  Collection and identification of Kentucky species of fish, mussels, crustaceans, amphibians, reptiles, and herbaceous and woody plants as well as first-hand observations of ecosystem characteristics and processes are a central theme in the course.  Three hour lab per week.  Co-requisite: BIO 227.  Fee.  

BIO 242 (4) Plant Taxonomy—In a world where there is a growing emphasis on environmental biology, it becomes increasingly necessary to know something about the major groups of plants. Plant phylogeny, major plant families, and modern taxonomic methods are emphasized in lectures. In the laboratory, field identification is stressed, with the greatest emphasis being placed on the use of keys for identifying herbaceous flowering plants. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.  Pre-requisite: One course in BIO. Fee. (alternate years)

BIO 252 (3) Nutrition—The basic principles of human nutrition are studied and then applied to the nutritional needs of humans at the various stages of the life cycle.  The chemical and physiological approach is emphasized. (alternate years)

BIO 262 (3) Human Physiology—The functions of the human body tissues, organs and organ systems are studied.  Specifically designed for pre-nursing, and pre-physician assistant students.

BIO 272 (4) Principles of Plant Biology—Introduction to plant biology.  Topics include plant structure and physiology, development, classification, diversity, and the roles plants play in ecological systems.  The different ways humans depend on, and impact, plants in our changing world are also discussed.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.  Pre-requisite:  BIO 202/204.  Fee.

BIO 280 (3) Scientific and Medical Terminology—Designed to provide science and pre-professional health majors with a basic knowledge of the linguistic principles inherent in the specialized vocabulary of medical science.

BIO 322 (3) Genetics—A basic knowledge of Mendelian genetics is assumed. Traditional topics such as Mendelian genetics, meiosis, cytogenetics and population genetics are covered.  Emphasis is also placed on modern molecular genetics including DNA organization, protein synthesis, gene control and recombinant DNA technology.  Pre-requisites: BIO 201/203 and 202/204. (alternate years)

BIO 331 (3) Human Anatomy—A comprehensive study of mammalian anatomy approached through a detailed examination of the organ systems of the human body.  Designed for science majors and required for pre-nursing students.

BIO 333 (1) Human Anatomy Lab—A laboratory approach to the study of mammalian anatomy, including a detailed dissection of Felis domesticus.  This lab is a Co-requisite for BIO 331, except for some pre-nursing students. In conjunction with BIO 331, satisfies the foundational requirement for a natural science.  Three-hour lab per week. Fee.

BIO 341 (2) Ethical Issues—Designed to help the students explore, from a biblical perspective, ethical issues involved in the practice and application of science. Pre-requisite: Sophomore status.

BIO 352 (4) Physiology—First half focuses upon the cellular and ionic basis of nerve and muscle function followed by a detailed examination of the physiology of the heart and circulation. The remaining organ systems are each examined briefly in the second half with the major emphasis being the study of higher nervous function. Seeks to develop the student's conceptual and quantitative skills and to prepare the student to understand the nature and potential consequences of common diseases. Pre-requisites: One year chemistry and physics; one semester calculus recommended, but not required. Three hours of lecture and three hours lab per week. Fee.

BIO 372 (4) Cell and Molecular Biology—An introduction to the regulation of cellular structure and function at the molecular level with an emphasis on the study of enzymes and nucleic acids.  Three hours of lecture and three hours lab per week.  Pre-requisites: BIO 201/203, 202/204, CHE 121, 122, 201, and 202. (CHE 202 may be taken as a Co-requisite). Fee.

BIO 379 (3) Immunology—An introduction to the biology and chemistry of the immune system. Includes discussion of antigen/antibody reactions, antibody synthesis, humoral and cell‑mediated immunity, tolerance, the role of the immune system in disease related processes, and immuno-assay procedures. Includes several laboratory exercises. (alternate years)

BIO 391 (1-3) Independent Study—Offered by consent by supervising instructor in the biology department.  A topic is established by negotiations with the instructor.  A student may not take more than 6 hours.  Contract.

BIO 393 (1-4) Seminar—Discussion of selected topics.  May be offered in conjunction with other departments or as a separate course primarily for biology students. (on occasion)

BIO 399 (1) Introduction to Biological Research—A practical experience which introduces the student to the methods of biological research and writing. The topic for an independent research project (for BIO 400) is chosen; a literature search is initiated; and essential laboratory techniques pertinent to the project are mastered. Pre-requisite: Junior standing and a minimum of 12 hours each of biology and chemistry.

BIO 400 (1-2) Senior Research in Biology—Required of all biology majors. Students will, under faculty supervision, independently design and carry to completion an independent, scientific research project of a biological nature. A senior research paper must be written at the completion of the project.  Students must earn a total of at least 2 credits but may take 1 credit per semester in their senior year.  Pre-requisite: Senior standing and completion of BIO 399.  Contract 

BIO 475 (1) Senior Seminar—Designed to provide practical experience in the oral presentation of a scientific paper. Students will prepare and present a seminar on their research projects (BIO 400).  Pre-requisites: Senior standing and BIO 400.

BIBLE-THEOLOGY 

BTH 300 (3) Bible, Culture, and JusticeThis course will explore the biblical mandate to love our neighbors as ourselves (Lev 19:18; Mark 12:31). Drawing from all parts of Scripture, students will study biblical passages relating to some of the pressing issues Christians face in contemporary society such as human trafficking, poverty and economic justice, abortion and child welfare, discrimination, gender roles and sexual identity. The goal of the course is not to provide students with a pat answer for each issue, but to equip students with tools to evaluate and respond in Christian ways to these concerns.  (Pre-requisites:  OT 100 and NT 100).  Alternate years.

BTH 320 (3) Biblical Interpretation—A study of the methods and principles of biblical interpretation. It includes an application of interpretive principles to such areas as literary genre, historical and theological issues, the history of interpretation and the relationship between the testaments. Pre-requisites: OT 100 and NT 100.

BTH 330 (3) Defending the Christian FaithAn introduction to Christian apologetics: the church’s reasoned, faithful responses to problems and criticisms of the Christian faith. The course (a) surveys the range of approaches to apologetics; (b) evaluates the kinds of evidence used (philosophical/theological, scientific, scriptural, ecclesiastical, and spiritual); and (c) explores the Christian responses to skepticism on various issues (e.g., the existence of God, miracles, historicity of Jesus’ resurrection). (Pre-requisites:  OT 100 and NT 100).  Alternate years.

BTH 340 (3) Holiness and the Christian LifeThis course explores the biblical, theological, and historical foundations of Christian holiness and its relation to the doctrine of salvation. Special emphasis will be given to a Wesleyan understanding of holiness, and its relevance in relation to contemporary expressions of Christian spirituality. (Pre-requisites:  OT 100, NT 100 and TH 250). Alternate years.

BTH 435 (3) InternshipThe application of ministry principles in an actual ministry setting, with a primary focus on pastoral ministry.  Supervised by appropriate ministry personnel.  Credit/No Credit.  Pre-requisites:  JR/SR status; major/minor only.  Contract.

BTH 475 (1) Senior Seminar—A discussion-oriented course examining issues in biblical and theological studies. Requirements include readings and written reflections, with a required ministry experience for pre-ministry majors. Credit/no credit. Passing grades are based on fulfillment of requirements, attendance and participation.

BUSINESS 

BU/BUA 100 (3) Introduction to Business & Personal Finance—This course will provide a general understanding of the field of business through a broad study of the economic environment in which business is conducted, the various functions of business operations, and the relationship of business to government.  Students will be introduced to the global factors that influence business, society, individual careers, and national standards of living.  In addition, students will be introduced to important topics within personal finance that will help them understand how to be more informed consumers and participants in ongoing debates concerning business and the economy.

BU/BUA 211 (3) Principles of Management—The topic of management is introduced from a business leadership perspective.  Students will be exposed to methods of motivation, group management and how to work in virtual teams.  The topics of innovation and entrepreneurship are also explored to understand how each person can have impact on the world.  Learning about how to implement successful change and the ideas of corporate social responsibility conclude the study of management.

BU/BUA 241 (3) Principles of Marketing—This course is the study of the marketing function within for-profit and non-profit enterprise. The student will learn the essential principles and concepts around the five primary areas of marketing- product, pricing, promotion, and distribution. Student will learn how businesses interact with their customers in the marketplace through reading, case studies, guest lectures, and projects.

BU/BUA 251 (3) Applications in Business Communication An integration of the essential tools for business: business writing, group communication and business-related software applications, utilizing the modern-day topic of eCommerce.  Focuses on developing professional writing skills; learning to work successfully in a group setting; and effectively utilizing Microsoft Office tools.  Pre-requisite: COM 150 and ENG 110 or 151.  Co-requisite: BU/BUA 252.

BU/BUA 252 (1) Applications in Business Communication LabA one-hour lab completed in conjunction with BU/BUA 251. This lab covers Microsoft Office applications, including but not limited to, Excel, PowerPoint and Word.  Co-requisite: BU/BUA 251.   Credit/No Credit.

BU/BUA 281 (2) Personal Financial Management—This course is designed to familiarize the student with the following topics which will aid in personal money management: personal family budgeting and banking, insurance principles (property, liability, health, and life insurance), financial loans, income tax, investment principles, retirement and estate planning. May not apply to BU major or minor.  (offered on occasion).

BU/BUA 312 (3) Small Business Management—This course examines the development and management of the business venture.  Topics include: the innovation idea, the development of business and financial plans, feasibility studies, alternative modes of financing, and the launching of the venture.

BU/BUA 321 (3) Business Law I—An introduction to the American Legal System including an overview of both civil and criminal procedure.  A study of the applications of legal principles to business transactions. Substantive areas to be considered include: Contracts, Commercial Paper, Sales, Real Property, Personal Property, Wills and Trusts, Agency, Torts, Business Crimes.

BU/BUA 322 (3) Business Law II—An examination of government influence on business and the societal obligations of the business professional and firm, as required by law and public policy.  Continued study of substantive legal principles governing business transactions.  Subjects surveyed include: Corporations, Partnerships, Secured Transactions, Bankruptcy, Antitrust Law, Labor Law, Securities Regulations, Consumer Protection Laws, and Professional Liability. Pre-requisite:  BM/BU/BUA 321.

BU/BUA 331 (3) Human Resource Management—A study of issues related to attracting, motivating, and retaining employees.  This course discusses the activities of planning staffing, appraising, compensating, training and developing, improving, and establishing work relationships with employees.  Pre-requisite:  BM/BU/BUA 211.

BU/BUA 335 (3) International Business VenturesThis course examines the unique issues faced by business ventures engaging in international activities; the influences of economic, political, legal, and cultural environments on international business operations and management.  The dynamics of religion, beliefs, language, legal environments, and politics that influence leadership, motivation, communication, ethical concerns, and management decision-making are discussed. This course utilizes case studies and discussions with special emphasis on small and medium businesses as well as new ventures.

BU/BUA 339(3) Business as Mission(Same as MIS 339) This course examines the role of business in missions. The general areas covered in this class are comprised of: 1) the philosophy of business as mission; 2) practical issues related to using business as a method for cross-cultural missions; and 3) an investigation of the spectrum of business models employed. By utilizing case studies, students in the course will have a better understanding of the opportunities and challenges associated with integrating business and missions.

BU/BUA 341 (3) Digital Marketing and Channel Management—Information technology has created entire new industries and is transforming traditional business models. The worldwide web has created new distribution channels, such as software-as-a-service and search engines that can powerfully change the dynamics of competition in the marketplace. Entire product lines and distribution channels are now being developed that are digital in form; and customers are serviced through ever-sophisticated internet-based programs. E-commerce in the form of business-to-business and business-to-consumer models will be examined in light of rapidly changing technology. This course will use case studies, the internet, lectures, guest speakers, and other reading materials to introduce and explore the concepts driving marketing in a digital age of business. Pre-requisite: BU 241.

BU/BUA 342 (3) Consumer Behavior and Decision-making—Understanding consumers’ needs, wants and the process by which they are satisfied is crucial to a successful marketing program. This course explores consumer behavior such as buying patterns, motivation and search behavior from multiple perspectives including social, cultural, psychological and economic perspectives particularly as they apply to consumer decisions and post-purchase emotions. The objective is for students to synthesize these perspectives in order to understand the implications for marketing an organization’s goods and services.

BU/BUA 343 (3) Fundamentals of Personal Selling and Sales Management—Without a sale there is no business. This course equips the student with the fundamental principles and concepts of personal selling and sales management. Everyone sells—whether it’s a product, service, idea, or themselves. Personal selling skills prepare students to rapidly enter the marketplace and contribute to their employer. The strategic selling process is also studied as well as the management concepts surrounding the sales force. Business-to-business and business-to-consumer sales models will be examined in this course. This class will utilize case studies, role playing, guest lectures, and other reading materials.

BU/BUA 391 (1-3) Independent Study—Independent study projects with required written reports approved and directed by a member of the Business Management faculty. Contract.

BU/BUA 393 (1-3) Seminar—Designated special-interest classes, seminars, or field experiences supervised by faculty, with the appropriate course requirements.  Credit may be given more than once.

BU/BUA 410 (3) Management of Innovation —An introduction to tools and concepts that will help understand the role of emerging technologies, as well as identify opportunities and possibilities for competitive advantage through innovation. Specific topics covered include sources and models of innovation, innovation strategy, and new product development.

BU/BUA 412 (3) Organizational Behavior and Structure— This course provides an overview of topics in the field of organizational behavior. Topics covered include leadership, motivation, teamwork, decision processes, conflict, organizational change, and learning. The course will focus on how to improve productivity, job satisfaction, and commitment. Elements of regulatory and legal environment on businesses will also be integrated in the course. Pre-requisites: MGT320 or BM/BU/BUA 211.

BU/BUA 413 (3) Strategic Management and Ethics— This capstone course is case based and application driven utilizing the skills and knowledge learned in previous courses to develop and analyze strategic management solutions for businesses and organizations.  Ethical scenarios will be incorporated into this course as well.  Pre-requisites: MGT 320 or BM/BU/BUA 211, and BM/BU/BUA 451.

BU/BUA 415 (3) Entrepreneurship:  Opportunity Recognition/Market Research—This course provides an overview of the opportunity recognition/evaluation process by examining how to identify and create entrepreneurial opportunities.    Students will learn and apply various marketing research techniques that will enable them to make sound decisions about new products or services in either an existing firm or new venture.

BU/BUA 420 (3) Entrepreneurial Finance and Venture Creation—This course focuses on the financial aspects of venture creation. Topics include pro forma development and review, business valuation models, cash flow analysis, and raising capital from private investors, venture capitalists, and banks.

BU/BUA 425 (3) Social Entrepreneurship— Entrepreneurship in itself is bringing forth something new and assuming the risk of implementing it.  Social entrepreneurship intertwines the innovative spirit with the societal impact to empower others in the quest for sustainable change.  This course explores the concepts, theories and practice of social entrepreneurship domestically and internationally.

BU/BUA 430 (3) Non-Profit Leadership and Management —This course is a survey of the operational and management practices of non-governmental, nonprofit organizations.  There are key features that differentiate nonprofit organizations within organizational design, governance structures, board and community relations, fiscal structures and the regulatory environment.  These topics will be covered as they specifically relate to the non-governmental, nonprofit organizations.

BU/BUA 435 (3) Internship—Students are placed with cooperating firms for on‑the‑job training in business and accounting. Written reports to be submitted by the firm and by the student to the professor. This is an option for the student and will be tailored to fit the student's needs as far as possible. Consent of the instructor must be secured. Contract.

BU/BUA 440 (3) Non-Profit Fundraising, Grant Writing and Philanthropy—Revenue generation is critical for the going concern of any non-governmental nonprofit organization. This is accomplished through fundraising, grants, contracts and philanthropic efforts that will be examined during this course. Evaluation of current fundraising strategies and hands-on experience with grant writing are highlights of the course content.

BU/BUA 441 (3) Market Research—Students in this course are introduced to the tools and methodologies used in the field of consumer and business market research.  Attention is given to problem definition, research design, gathering information, and data analysis to assist management in the marketing decision-making process. Pre-requisites: BM/BU/BUA 241, ECA/ECN 325 or PSY 315.

BU/BUA 442 (3) Innovation and Product Management—This course is designed to work through the process of innovation and product development. The product life cycle is explored within the context of disruptive innovation. Students will be exposed to the techniques for idea generation, turning these ideas into products and services that meet specific consumer needs, testing their marketing feasibility, and launching the product. This course will emphasize the use of teams for collaboration and hands-on projects. Pre-requisite: BU 241.

BU/BUA 443 (3) International Marketing—The globalization of markets enables companies to increasingly conduct their business across national borders. The international dimensions of marketing require management to understand and incorporate the difference of culture, politics, geography, and legal issues as they consider selling their products abroad. This course will introduce the student to the principles and concepts of international marketing through readings, case studies, and research projects. Pre-requisite: BU 241.

BU/BUA 445 (3) Fiscal and Performance Management of a Non-profit —This course will introduce the requirements of adequate financial systems for non-profit organizations.  This includes the form and content of reports as well as performance management techniques and analysis.  It will also focus on understanding how to develop budgets, manage daily fiscal activities, establish internal controls and meet regulatory requirements.

BU/BUA 450 (3) Community Development—This course surveys key principles and issues in community development both domestically and internationally including methods of community assessment, strategies for identifying, evaluating and implementing community-level initiatives, and working with the strengths of the community as a whole.

BU/BUA 451 (3) Principles of Finance—This course examines the basic concepts, principles, and functions of managerial finance. Topics emphasized include financial markets, valuation models for stocks and bonds, time value of money, cost of capital, risk and return, and capital budgeting. Pre-requisites: ECN/ECA 272, ACC/ACA 201 and ACC/ACA 202.

BU/BUA 452 (3) Principles of Investment—Conceptual and analytical frameworks for formulating investment policies, analyzing securities, and constructing portfolio strategies for individuals and institutions. Pre-requisite: BM/BU/BUA 451.

BU/BUA 455 (3) Systems Approach—This course contains a traditional systems analysis and design course with a focus on problem identification, scope and decomposition.  Students will learn how to model systems with an emphasis on business processes and process re-engineering (Hammer and Champy’s approach).

BU/BUA 457 (3) Operations Management—This course provides an introduction to operations and supply chain management.  Topics such as quality control, product, service and facility design, project management, capacity planning and various quantitative analysis tools will be reviewed. Pre-requisite: ECN/ECA 325.

BU/BUA 460 (3) Management of Data—This course emphasizes what happens once you have extracted the data from a database. Gain hands on experience manipulating data and understanding the way data is structured, rather than creating the data sources.  A focus will be placed on using data within ERP systems.

BU/BUA 461 (3) Brand Management—Product and brand management is the study of a broad range of activities centered around a line of products offered by an enterprise. This course exposes a student to the contemporary challenges of managing a product portfolio. The student will learn how to formulate strategies for building, leveraging, and defending brand positions. Using case studies and other tools the student will acquire the knowledge needed to become a successful product manager.  Pre-requisites: BU/BUA 241.

BU/BUA 465 (3) Business Intelligence/Support—In popular press Business Intelligence is referred to as Big Data.  Focus is not on building the data warehouse, but rather how to query data cubes and exploring the questions a business can answer with data.  Hands on experience will be given with analytical tools such as SAS Data Miner.

BU/BUA 470 (3) Security and Privacy—With so much mobile technology in use today, the security of an organization’s private data becomes that much more important.  This course approaches the topics of security and privacy from a policy perspective of the organization.

BU/BUA 471 (3) Marketing Strategy & PlanningThis is the capstone marketing management class. The course examines the management of marketing organizations and the integration of functions such as pricing, research, product development, innovation, distribution, and supply chain, with an emphasis on designing and implementing marketing strategies. The course will utilize industry case studies, guest lectures, projects, and related readings.  Pre-requisite: Bu/BUA 241.

BU/BUA 472 (3) Supply Chain Management—This course will consider the supply function, including organization procedures, supplier selection, quality, inventory management and price determination.  Quantitative tools for planning and control functions such as forecasting, inventory planning, resource planning and scheduling are also incorporated into the course. Pre-requisite: BM/BU/BUA 457

CROSS CULTURAL EXPERIENCE

CCE 073 (0) Cross-Cultural Experience—This credit will be listed on student’s audit upon approved completion of CCE. A Cross-Cultural Experience is defined as an immersion into another culture, engaging the student in a variety of life-spheres (family, education, religion, art, media, economics, government).  Most experiences will expose the student to cultural dynamics outside the United States and Canada.  The experience must be of sufficient length and intensity to have adequate impact upon the worldview of the participant. 

CHAPEL

CH 021 (0) Chapel Attendance—required each semester for traditional full time undergraduates. 

CHEMISTRY 

CHE 111 (3) Introductory Chemistry*/

CHE 115 (3) Chemistry For The Health Sciences**

Basic concepts of general, organic, and biological chemistry for *non-science majors or **pre-nursing students.  Topics include electronic structure of atoms and molecules, periodicity of the elements, stoichiometry, states of matter, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, organic functional groups, stereochemistry, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and enzymes.  CHE 111/113 or CHE 115/117 satisfies the foundational requirement for a natural science. Pre-requisite: ACT/SAT Math score of 22/510 or MAT 100.  Three hours lecture per week.  Co-requisite: CHE113 or CHE 117

*Non-science majors register for CHE111

**Pre-nursing students register for CHE 115

CHE 113 (1) Introductory Chemistry Lab*/

CHE 117 (1) Chemistry for Health Sciences Lab**

Laboratory experience designed to complement CHE 111 or CHE 115.  The laboratory exercises will highlight concepts presented in CHE 111 and CHE 115 and are designed to promote the development of laboratory and problem solving skills. One 3-hour lab per week. Fee.

*Non-science majors register for CHE 113

**Pre-nursing students register for CHE 117

CHE 121 (3) General College Chemistry I—For science and pre-medical students.  An introduction to theory, principles and problem solving in inorganic chemistry.  Topics include molecular structure, classification of reactions, stoichiometry, gases, thermochemistry and quantum mechanics.  CHE 121/123 satisfies the foundational requirement for a natural science.  Three hours lecture per week.  Co-requisite: CHE 123.

CHE 123 (1) General College Chemistry Lab I—Laboratory experience designed to complement CHE 121.  Reinforces concepts and problem solving skills presented in lecture.  In addition, students will analyze data, draw conclusions, and present results in formal written reports. One three-hour lab per week. Co-requisite: CHE 121. Fee.

CHE 122 (3) General College Chemistry II—For science and pre-medical students.  A continuation of introductory chemistry.  Topics include molecular and intermolecular bonding, rates of reactions, equilibrium, acid-base theory, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.  Three hours lecture per week. Pre-requisites: CHE 121/123 or equivalent. Co-requisite: CHE 124.

CHE 124 (1) General College Chemistry Lab II — Laboratory experience designed to complement CHE 122.  Reinforces concepts and problem solving skills presented in lecture.  In addition, students will analyze data, draw conclusions, and present results in formal written reports.  One three-hour lab per week. Pre-requisites: CHE 121/123 or equivalent. Co-requisite: CHE 122. Fee.

CHE 201, 202 (4 each) Organic Chemistry—An introduction to the study of organic compounds. The structure, nomenclature, synthesis and reactions of the major classes or organic compounds are studied, along with the major themes of reaction mechanisms and spectroscopic methods of identification. This course satisfies the foundational requirement for a physical laboratory science. Pre-requisite: CHE 122/124 or permission. Three hours lecture and 3-hour lab/week. Fee.

CHE 321 (4) Analytical Chemistry—Basic principles, theory, and practice of quantitative analysis, including standard, traditional methods of analysis and instrumental methods of analysis. Three hours of lecture and one 4-hour lab/week. Pre-requisite: CHE 122/124. Fee.

CHE 322 (3) Chemical Instrumentation—Modern theory and techniques of instrumental analysis, covering potentiometry, spectroscopy and chromatography. Two hours of lecture and one 3-hour lab/week. Pre-requisite: CHE 122/124.  Fee. (alternate years)

CHE 371 (4) Biochemistry—An introduction to cellular chemistry.  Includes protein structure and enzyme function, carbohydrate, lipid and amino acid metabolism, nucleic acid synthesis and function and genetic engineering. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.  Pre-requisite: CHE 202 or permission. Fee. (alternate years)

CHE 382 (3) Inorganic Chemistry—Covers the following areas:  1. Theories of chemical bonding, including molecular orbital theory.  2.  Symmetry and group theory, and its application to bonding.  3.  Advanced topics in acid-base chemistry.  4.  Survey of main group chemistry.  5.  Coordination chemistry of the transition metals, including structures, bonding, spectra, and reaction mechanisms.  6.  Organometallic chemistry.  7.  Bioinorganic chemistry.  Pre-requisites:  CHE 121, 122, 201, 202.  (alternate years)

CHE 391 (1-3) Independent Study—Offered by consent by supervising instructor in the Chemistry Department.  A topic is established by negotiations with the instructor.  A student may not take more than 6 hours.  Contract.

CHE 393 (1) Seminar—Discussion of selected topics. May be offered in conduction with other departments or as a separate course primarily for Chemistry students.

CHE 399 (1) Introduction to Chemical Research—A practical experience which introduces the student to the methods of chemical research and writing. The topic for an independent research project (CHE 400) is chosen and the literature search is initiated.  Pre-requisite: Junior standing and a minimum of 12 hours of chemistry.

CHE 400 (1-2) Senior Research in Chemistry—Required of all chemistry majors. Biochemistry majors take BIO 400 or CHE 400.  Students will, under faculty supervision, design and carry to completion an independent scientific research project of a chemical nature. A senior research paper must be written at the completion of the project. Students must earn a total of 2 credits but may take 1 credit per semester in their senior year.  Pre-requisite: Senior standing and completion of CHE 399.  Contract.

CHE 421, 422 (4 each) Physical Chemistry—The first course (421) focuses on chemical thermodynamics and includes the study of gas behavior, the laws of thermodynamics, enthalpy, entropy, free energy, phase and chemical equilibria.  The second course (422) covers quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and chemical kinetics.  Two hours of lecture, one hour of problem solving, and one 3-hour lab/week.  Pre-requisite or Co-requisite:  PHY 201, 202  or 211, 212; MAT 181 (also MAT 182 for CHE 422). Fee. (alternate years for CHE 422)

CHE 435 (3) Internship—A summer undergraduate research experience of at least 6 weeks culminating in a paper on the research.  The research may take place at Asbury or at another institution.  Contract.

CHE 475 (1) Senior Seminar—Designed to provide practical experience in the oral presentation of a scientific paper. Students will prepare and present a seminar on their research projects (CHE 400). Pre-requisites: CHE 400 and senior standing.

CHURCH MUSIC 

CHM 210 (2) Music in Worship—A brief examination of the history and philosophy of church music in its relation to fixed and free forms of Christian worship.  Includes study of both Western and non-Western indigenous practices. Open to all students without Pre-requisites.

CHM 312 (2) Church Music Administration—A philosophical and practical study of methods and materials used in the administration and leadership of congregational, choral and instrumental music in the church. Open to all students without Pre-requisites.

CHM 435 (3) Internship—An internship under the guidance of experienced and qualified church musicians in an approved church music program. It is designed for the student to acquire the practical experience vital to understanding a comprehensive ministry of church music.  The internship may also be completed internationally, with the expectation that the student will assume full financial responsibility.  Contract.

CHM 472 (2) Songs of the Church—An introduction to the historical and analytical study and utilization of songs intended for Christian worship.  The content begins with Biblical songs and progresses to the current time.  Open to all students without Pre-requisites.

CHINESE 

CHN 101 (3) Elementary Chinese I—An introduction to spoken Chinese with emphasis on listening (especially tones) and speaking, basic vocabulary, and basic reading skills.

CHN 102 (3) Elementary Chinese II—A review and expansion of spoken Chinese building upon the skills acquired in CHN 101.  Pre-requisite:  CHN 101.

CHN 151 (3) Chinese Culture—An introduction to Chinese culture from ancient to modern times.  Students will be exposed to the essentials of the geography of China, its music, art, philosophies, and belief systems. The most famous people and events of Chinese history will be studied, along with the country’s most important landmarks.  Modern China and its place in the contemporary world will also be examined.  All readings and discussions in English.  Pre-requisite:  none

CHN 201 (3) Intermediate Chinese—A course to introduce students to the first stages of intermediate proficiency in Chinese.  Attention to the development of the skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  Pre-requisite:  CHN 102.

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES

[All Classics (CLA) course readings are in English with no knowledge of Greek or Latin required.]

CLA 211 (3) Classical Mythology—An introduction to classical mythology. Critical approaches to myths as well as the relationship of myth to areas such as art, literature, and religion will be explored.

CLA 212 (3) Classical Culture and Civilization—An introduction to Greco-Roman culture and civilization, and its influence on Western society.

CLA 223 (3) Survey of Classical Literature—An introduction to the major authors, genres, and periods of classical literature.

CLA 391 (1-3) Independent Study – Independent study in a specialized field in consultation with supervising professor.  Pre-requisite: Completion of at least one 200-level Classical Languages course and a 3.0 GPA in Classical Languages courses or permission of professor. Contract.

CLA 475 (1) Senior Seminar–—A course for all World Languages majors where students are asked to integrate and assess their skills with literature, language, and culture. Required of all World Languages majors.

CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES

CM 100 (3) Ministry and Mission in the Contemporary Church—An examination of various models of the church and its ministry. Contemporary expressions of the church's mission in the world will be explored and compared to Biblical ideas, and students will develop a personal statement of ministry philosophy. Consideration will be given to the call, qualifications, and roles of ministry leaders. Every semester.

CM 201 (3) Dynamics of Spiritual Growth—A study of the dynamics of Christian growth and maturity, with special emphasis on the Spirit-filled life. Concepts of discipleship and spiritual formation will be considered in the light of human developmental patterns.  The course is concerned with students' own spiritual growth, and their facilitation of others' spiritual growth. Every semester.

CM 211 (3) Instructional Bible Study—A Bible study skill course combined with examination and application of appropriate methods and materials for teaching the Bible. Opportunity is given in lab sessions to develop personal skills in teaching and leading small group Bible studies. Every semester.

CM 213 (3) Introduction to Worship—An examination of the history and biblical base of Christian worship, including implications for the role and development of forms of worship in contemporary ministry. Fee. Spring.

CM 235 (1) CM Practicum—Opportunity for observation and practical experience in ministry settings as a means to clarify direction and call to ministry through networking with professionals serving in a ministry role. Periodic class sessions provide opportunity for interaction with peers and reflection on ministry practices.  Majors and minors only.  May be repeated once for credit. Every semester.

CM 331 (3) Principles of Preaching--This course focuses on developing skills for effectively communicating the Christian gospel using a variety of preaching styles.  Students will learn principles for planning, preparing, and delivering messages that are biblically sound and relevant to the needs of our ever-changing culture.  Some class sessions will serve as labs for practicing these principles in a context of cooperative learning. (Pre-requisites:  OT 100 and NT 100). Alternate years.

CM 361 (3) Worship Through the Ages--A study of worship through the lenses of Scripture and Christian history, with an emphasis on developing theological reflection skills regarding worship practices.  Students develop their own philosophy of congregational worship.  Pre-requisite:  CM 213.

CM 380 (3) Organizational Strategies in Ministry—A study of organizational strategies and administrative structures for effective ministry. Attention is given to planning, implementing and evaluating the organizational and administrative framework of various types of ministries.  Pre-requisite: CM 100. Fall.

CM 391 (1-3) Independent Study—A directed and supervised investigation of a selected research problem or issue in Christian ministry. The preparation of a scholarly paper is included. Pre-requisites:  EM 280, seniors only, departmental permission required. (May not be repeated for credit.) Contract.

CM 393 (1-3) Seminar—The study of various issues and fields of Christian ministry, with special emphasis on trends and issues of contemporary ministry.  Topics will be determined and announced for each semester the seminar is offered.  Pre-requisites: EM 340, 350, 360, CM 380. (Not more than 4 hours of seminar credit may count towards major or minor. Admission by departmental permission only.)

CM 411 (3) Leadership in Ministry—A survey of foundational principles of leadership and leadership development in ministry settings. Students develop personal leadership skills relating to team ministry. Odd years, Spring.

CM 435 (3) Internship—The application of ministry principles in an actual ministry setting, supervised by appropriate ministry personnel. Credit/No credit. Pre-requisites: Either EM 340, 350, or 360 (whichever is appropriate to the internship situation), and CM 380; JR/SR status; major/minor only. Contract.

CM 475 (3) Senior Seminar—A reflection upon the entire field of Christian Ministries with specific orientation toward the evaluation of experience and the setting of goals for future ministry. Senior majors and minors only.  Pre-requisite: CM/MIS/YM 435. Fall.

COMMUNICATION

COM 130 (3) The Cultural Influence of Mass Media

Students develop their public speaking and critical thinking skills by examining how mass oratory and media impact culture.  Starts with public speaking skills understanding what a biblical worldview means, then analyzes contemporary messages in news, television entertainment, documentaries, film, the internet, and other media.  Emphasis given to recognizing the cultural formation aspects of mass media and becoming better consumers of media by evaluating messages in the light of Biblical instruction and ethics.

COM 150 (3) Introduction to Communication—Starting with an emphasis on developing public speaking skills, this course then surveys the major areas of communication research to include self identity, interpersonal skills, group communication, and leadership.  The course concludes with a look at the influence of mass media, its prevalence, theories, impact and effects on individuals and society. Fee. 

COM 220 (3) Interpersonal Communication—Interpersonal communications impacts the nature of all our relationships. This course explores the role of communication in the construction of the self, our perception of reality, relational development and deterioration, friendships and family, and in conflict management.

COM 221 (3) Narratives and Ideologies of Hollywood—Stories shape society, and the medium used shapes the stories.  Blends mass media and narrative theory with theology as it looks at how stories are told in film, various television genres, radio, newspapers, magazines, and advertising.  Emphasis given to understanding what Hollywood teaches theologically, how mass media stories shape modern culture, and then analyzing and creating stories for moral purposes.

COM 230 (3) Introduction to Leadership—Course will focus on leadership as a field of study and on the personal leadership development of each student.  The course introduces students to several styles, characteristics, and practices of leadership, and examines dimensions of leadership in varied contexts.  The course is preparatory for students placed in positions of designated or collaborative leadership.

COM 240 (1) Intercollegiate Forensics—For students who desire to participate in the intercollegiate forensic program. Practice in persuasion, extempore and impromptu speaking, oral interpretation and duo acting will be given. No more than three hours may be earned toward graduation and no more than one hour may be earned per semester.

COM 251 (3) Intercultural Communications—Focuses on introducing the fundamental topics, theories and theorists, cultural values models, concepts and themes that are at the center of research in intercultural communication.  The application of that information will focus on identifying, understanding, and being able to effectively apply knowledge so as to increase one’s cultural intelligence, particularly in the educational and business world.

COM 261 (3) Social Media and Emerging Technologies—Explores, through case studies, discussion, interactive exercises, how social media and emerging technologies are shaping our society and impacting nearly every level of culture. This interactive course, an orientation to the social media landscape, will be divided into three units, 1) social media foundations, 2) social media platforms, and 3) social media ethics. Foundations will answer the questions who needs social media,  what is social media, and why is it important to business. Platforms will cover where to find tools necessary to build and engage community.  Finally, ethics explores best social media practices. Students will also analyze a current online presence to explore its application of social media tools and audience engagement. Technologies covered include blogs, microblogs, collaboration tools, podcasts, RSS feeds, social bookmarking, and other emerging web technologies.

COM 271 (3) Introduction to Communication Theory—An introductory, yet diversified, examination of various theories analyzing and describing the human communication process from different perspectives.  Systematic examination of models, structural components, content, audiences and effects of communication and their interaction.

COM 281 (3) Public Relations Theory and Practice—Introduces students to public relations and then lets the class put its skills into practice  by operating as its own PR firm.  Covers essential topics such as the importance of PR to society, ethical dilemmas, theories, crisis planning, working in cross-cultural environments and the future of PR.  Students produce press releases, communication plans, and presentations. Fee.

COM 331 (3) Group Communication and Leadership—The course is a study of the structure and dynamics of small groups with participation in the specialized forms of group discussion. Students will learn about the dynamics of group interaction with emphasis on leadership, subordinate participation, and problem solving, to encourage efficient and productive small group discussions.

COM 341 (3) Communication of the Gospel—The Good News of Jesus Christ is clearly the most important truth we can communicate, but many Christians find it difficult to bring the words of Jesus written 2000 years ago to life today.  This course focuses on Christian proclamation, and explores how we can best communicate God’s word in ways that are relevant to our culture while remaining faithful to scripture.

COM 342 (3) Communication Campaigns—Examines the intentional communication processes designed to influence a designated audience over a specific period of time.  Communication processes such as campaign cycles, campaign development and maintenance, and campaign strategies for commercial, political, and social action campaigns. (alternate years)

COM 350 (3) Organizational Communication—Communication is the lifeblood of an organization. This introduces theoretical and practical communication issues in contemporary organizations, to include analysis of how globalization, gender, employee participation programs, diversity and affirmative action issues, and homeland security affect today’s workplace.  Focus is placed upon how personal experiences and interaction shape opinion of organizations. (alternate years)

COM 351 (3) Persuasion—This course examines persuasion and influence from both scientific and psychological perspectives.  Basic persuasion tactics that are effective in changing attitudes and behaviors are examined in a variety of situations, and students apply learned techniques. Emphasis is also placed on learning from society’s masters of communication: commercial advertisers, experienced social action activists, and the political elite.

COM 391/491 (1-3) Directed Study—A directed and supervised investigation of a selected research problem or issue in the field of applied communication.  Reading and preparation of a scholarly paper or special project is included. Juniors may take 391, seniors 491; course credit for the major may be received only once. Contract.

COM 393 (1-3) Seminar—The study of various issues in the fields of communication and theatre arts, with special emphasis on trends and issues of contemporary communications. Topics will be determined and announced for each semester the course is offered.

COM 397 (3) Global Communications Field Trip—A study of communication leadership, public relations and international communications operations through traveling to large metropolitan cities, giving students an in-depth study of communication occupations.  Sites visited include global PR firms, tours of television studios, premier museums, historic sites, and interviews with Christians at the top of the communications field. Fee. 

COM 431 (3) Public Relations Management—This advanced PR course challenges students with case studies and familiarizes them with strategic management tools such as media monitoring, crisis planning, content analysis and questionnaire development.  Students pick a client and act as their PR agency, with an emphasis placed upon media interaction and training.  Pre-requisite:  COM 281.  Fee.

COM 435 (3) Internship—A supervised, work experience of one academic semester with a previously approved business firm, private, academic, or government agency.  Work experience of 120 hours will be expected plus a journal and final paper.  Pre-requisites: junior standing, Communications major, 12 hours completed within the major, and departmental approval. Contract.

COM 461 (3) Social Media Marketing—The growth of social media channels and applications have changed how business  conducts marketing, especially how business communicates with and interacts with consumers. This course introduces students to strategic marketing approaches needed to develop an effective social media marketing strategy for meeting organizational goals. Students will learn social media research, planning, implementation, measurement, best social media practices, and how to create successful programs and campaigns. Students will also execute a social marketing strategy, contribute to a course blog, conduct a 3-week social media campaign for a real client, and create a digital presentation analyzing their experience.

COM 475 (3) Senior Seminar—A capstone course designed to allow students to apply course work to professional issues beyond the undergraduate level. Course content includes a significant individual research paper, in-depth readings in communication journals to gain a broader understanding of the discipline, the nature of employment access, marketing one’s self, and personal assessment testing.

CONDUCTING MUSIC

CON 311 (2) Conducting I—Study of the fundamentals of conducting.  Pre-requisite: MTH 112

CON 312 (2) Conducting II—Course will include conducting skills with baton and the study of orchestral and band scores.  Score reading, score study, aural skill development, interpretation, style and rehearsal techniques are all part of the study. Members of the class serve as the laboratory ensemble. Pre-requisite:  CON 311.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CRJ 101 (3) Introduction to Criminal Justice— (same as SOC 101) A general overview of the criminal justice system including a description of the major agencies involved in the CRJ system: police, prosecution, courts, and corrections, and an analysis of their interdependence in the criminal justice process.

CRJ 102 (3)  Restorative Justice—The Restorative Justice Model is a philosophy founded on the belief that justice is best served when the community, victim, and offender receive balanced attention, and when all parties gain tangible benefits from their interactions with the juvenile and criminal justice system. Restorative Justice, sometimes referred to as the Peacemaking Perspective, represents an alternative lens to view, understand, and respond to crime and victimization.  Restorative Justice increases opportunities for victim involvement in the justice process, involves the community in the process of offender accountability and restitution, and ensures that the offender gains the skills to function more effectively in the community.

CRJ 302 (3)  Family and Domestic Violence—Examination of the theoretical and empirical literature on violence against women, children, and elders. Addresses such issues as physical and sexual abuse of children, courtship violence, domestic violence, marital rape, and elder abuse.

CRJ 331 (3) Intro to Criminological Research Overview of the research process, with emphasis on finding, using, and evaluating criminal justice research. Examination of both quantitative and qualitative social science research methods and procedures appropriate to the study of crime policy and criminal justice.

CRJ 401 (3)  Criminal Law and Process—This course covers selected topics in substantive criminal law: principles underlying the definition of crime such as the requirements of actus reus and mens rea and general doctrines such as ignorance of fact and ignorance of law, causation, attempt, complicity and conspiracy. Principles of justification and excuse are examined with particular attention to the doctrines of necessity, intoxication, insanity, diminished capacity and automatism. The substantive offense of homicide is extensively reviewed, and from time to time other offenses such as theft. Throughout, emphasis is placed on the basic theory of the criminal law and the relationship between doctrines and the various justifications for imposition of punishment.

CRJ 402 (3) Judicial Systems—An in depth study of law-making and the American judicial process. Includes a systematic and comprehensive analysis of American courts, their pivotal role in the criminal justice system, and the function and responsibilities of the key personnel within them.

CRJ 403 (3)  Criminal Justice Ethics—Examines the moral, legal and normative obligations of the state and criminal justice professionals. Surveys the philosophies and theories of ethics and deviance.

CRJ 404 (3) Fundamentals of Law Enforcement and Corrections—Examines theories and practice of organization, management, and daily duties as they relate to law enforcement and corrections officers. Organizational life, leadership, personnel management, bureaucracy, resource management, and other critical administration issues are addressed.

CRJ 407 (3) Field Experience—Designed to broaden the educational experience through appropriate observational and participational work assignments. Pre-requisites: junior standing.

CRJ 475 (3) Senior Seminar—Capstone course consisting of development and production of a senior level research paper grounded in relevant criminal justice literature. Emphasis on integration of knowledge acquired in previous courses. Pre-requisites: senior standing.

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

CSC 121 (4) Computer Science I—Focuses on problem solving and algorithm development, learning a high-level language, how to design, code, test, and document a program using standard programming techniques. Three lecture periods and one laboratory period per week. (alternate years)

CSC 122 (4) Computer Science II—Continuation of CSC 121. Further development of programming skills, algorithmic analysis, elementary data structures. Three lecture periods and one laboratory period per week.  Pre-requisite: CSC 121. (alternate years)

CSC 182 (1) Maple Seminar—An overview of the Maple computer algebra system.  Use of Maple is a requirement for mathematics major courses from MAT 182.  This course provides a systematic introduction to Maple that includes basic commands, data structures, logical controls and programming.

CSC 391 (1-3) Directed Study—A study of some area of computer science not covered in other courses. Offered based on demand and availability of teaching staff.  Pre-requisite: permission of instructor.  Contract.

CSC 393 (1) Seminar—Discussion of selected topics.  May be offered in conjunction with other departments or as a separate course primarily for math or computer science students.

ECONOMICS  

ECN 100 (3) Principles of Economics—Students are introduced the principles of micro and macroeconomics.  The course is an overview of the key concepts and theories of economics with an emphasis on understanding how an economy functions and the market dynamics that impact the management of a business.   

ECN/ECA 272 (3) Introduction to Microeconomics—This course will explore questions such as “How do people make decisions?”, “Do businesses maximize profits?”, “Do markets work?”, and “What role should the government have in the economy?”  The workhorse model of microeconomics, supply and demand, will be used to analyze consumer decisions, minimum wage laws, price controls, taxes and numerous other economic scenarios.

ECN/ECA 273 (3) Introduction to Macroeconomics—This course is a study of the big-picture national outcomes such as economic growth, inflation, unemployment and the national debt.   Major public programs such as Social Security, Medicare and taxes will be evaluated, including their future viability.  The roles of Congress and the Federal Reserve in shaping the economy will be analyzed from both Keynesian and Classical perspectives.

ECN/ECA 325 (3) Statistics for Economics—Students will develop the fundamental tools needed for quantitative business analysis in this course.  Topics will include statistically characterizing data, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.  The emphasis will be on the practical implementation of statistics in business and economics.  Spreadsheet analysis will be used extensively throughout the course. Pre-requisites: MAT 131 or higher.

ECN 372 (3) International Financial Markets and Monetary Economics—A study of the principles and function of the stock, bond, mutual fund, derivative and other major financial markets.  Operation of securities markets, monetary policy, interest rates, business cycles, inflation, money supply, stabilization policy, and financial restructuring.  Significant emphasis on international applications of financial developments and monetary policies around the globe.

ECN 391 (1-3) Independent Study—A directed and supervised investigation of a selected research problem or issue in economics, including the preparation of a scholarly paper. A student may not take more than four (4) hours of independent study.  Pre-requisite: permission of instructor. Contract.

ECN 393 (1-3) Seminar—Designated special-interest classes, seminars, or field experiences supervised by faculty, with the appropriate course requirements.  Credit may be given more than once.

ECN 471 (3) International Economics—Survey of both the micro and macro global economic environment.  Micro portion: comparative advantage and the effects of trade, tariffs and non tariff barriers, strategic trade policies, and trade and economic growth.  Macro portion: foreign exchange markets, the balance of payments, global financial restructuring, international debt and international inequality.  Pre-requisite: ECN 272 or ECN 273.

ECN 472 (3) Applied Econometrics—Application to current managerial concerns:  optimization analysis, pricing decision, production decision, output fluctuations and cost behavior.  Econometrical techniques and problems are introduced and analyzed:  regression analysis, time series analysis, ARIMA models, etc.  Pre-requisites: ECN 272, ECN 325 or PSY 315.

EDUCATION

ED/EDA 200 (2) Introduction to Education—An introduction to the historical and contemporary dynamics of education in America. Topics of study include the philosophies and theories of education, legal implications, teacher organizations, career opportunities, learning styles relevant to varying cultures, and the significance of participatory democracy.  This introductory course includes opportunities for working with experienced teachers in school classrooms in the area of intended major.  Students enrolled in this course are required to enroll in ED 201 Structured Inquiry Clinical-Based Experience concurrently. Clinicals:  Course embedded: 5 hours.  Fee. 

ED/EDA 201 (1) Structured Inquiry Clinical-Based Experience—This clinical field experience component is designed to enhance the initial School of Education cluster of courses. It has been designed to give prospective teacher education candidates an opportunity for initial exposure to classrooms in the public schools.  Students will spend 60 clinical/field experience hours in a variety of authentic settings with a structured inquiry work sample project.  A significant portion of this field component is designed to facilitate our students’ ability to work in schools with a high population of P-12 diverse students. Clinicals:  School embedded: 60 hours .  Fee.

ED/EDA 220 (2) Technology for Education—Introduction to the 21st Century Teaching Skills, as to the value and use of multiple apps and strategies for integrating technology in instruction.  These skills include, but are not limited to, iTools, instructional videos, podcasts, interactive whiteboards, multimedia, and web development tools to be used in the educational setting to facilitate student learning, student assessment and professional productivity. Clinicals:  Course embedded: 3 hours.  Fee. 

ED 225 (1) Assistive Technologies for Special Populations—An array of basic technology skills will be included to facilitate the education of students with disabilities.  Technological experiences will include:  authoring software, interactive electronic presentation device/software and an assistive technology workshop.  Clinicals: Course embedded: 5 hours.  Fee. 

ED/EDA 230 (2) Human Growth and Development—A study of the physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and moral aspects of human development through the life span including birth, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, and their interaction with environmental and cultural influences pertaining to elementary and secondary school teachers. Clinicals: Course embedded: 3-5 hours.  Fee.

ED/EDA 274 (3) Social Studies and Science Content in the Elementary Classroom—Provides an overview of the content in science and social studies that elementary teachers need in order to deliver the instruction and assess that content in the K-5 grades.  Candidates will be presented this content through the Kentucky Core Content for Assessment.  This core content will be viewed as a part of the curriculum of an elementary school program. Clinicals: Course embedded: 5 hours .  Fee.

ED/EDA 276 (3) Arts and Humanities and Practical Living/Vocational in the Elementary Classroom—Provides an overview of the content in arts, humanities, and practical living/vocational that teachers need in order to deliver the instruction and assess that content needed in the K-5 grades.  Some of the content included in these areas is music, drama, visual arts, dance, safety, careers, and health.  Candidates will be presented this content through the Kentucky Core content for Assessment in the areas of arts and humanities and practical living/vocational and learn the methodology in these content areas for instructional design and assessment.  This core content will be viewed as a part of the curriculum of an elementary school program. Clinicals:  Course embedded: 5 hours.  Fee. 

ED/EDA 290 (3) Facilitating EL Student Success—­This course addresses methods of assessment for teaching English Learners (EL) with an emphasis on a systemic assessment process as well as ethical and intercultural sensitivity.  Students will be introduced to criteria to ensure consistent identification of EL students, as well as to determine their eligibility, placement, and duration of programs and services based on English language proficiency assessment.  Candidates will acquire knowledge and skills related to language proficiency assessments that are linked to the new common curriculum, appropriate standardized assessments, and formative and summative assessments used for English Learners.  Candidates will be prepared to analyze assessment results to create intervention plans and to design instruction and monitor progress for English Learners. Clinicals:  Course embedded: 10 hours.  Fee. 

**NOTE** The following courses all require Admission to the Teacher Education Program (Gate 2). All candidates must complete successfully all Gate 2 requirements before taking any 300-level or above courses.

ED/EDA 301 (1) Guided Inquiry Clinical-Based Experience- This clinical field experience component is designed to enhance the School of Education’s second cluster of courses. ED 301 provides prospective teacher education candidates an initial opportunity to demonstrate their ability to plan and implement inquiry based instruction with P-12 students. Candidates will spend 75 clinical/field experience hours in variety of authentic settings with a guided inquiry work sample project.  A significant portion of this field component is designed to further facilitate our students’ ability to work in schools with a high population of P-12 diverse students.  This component is taken concurrently with methods courses. Clinicals:  School embedded: 75 hours.  Fee. 

ED/EDA 320 (3) Exceptional Learner in the General Education Classroom—An introduction to the field of special education dealing with the learning needs of exceptional children - those who are gifted and those who have intellectual, emotional, physical, or sensory disabilities. Course emphasis is on principles and procedures for adapting educational programs to accommodate the needs of these children in the general education classrooms. School-embedded clinical experience required. Pre-requisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Clinicals: Course embedded: 10 hours.  Fee. 

ED 330 (2) Behavioral Intervention of Students with Learning and Behavior Disabilities—Offers principles and techniques for managing the behavior of children and youth with disabilities. Preventive, supportive, and corrective techniques are included. The course focuses on the development of management plans that provide positive behavior supports for P-12 students. Level II Field component required.  Clinicals: Course embedded: 10 hours. Pre-requisite: ED 320.  Fee.

ED 332 (3) Collaboration and Advocacy for Special Populations—Focuses on collaborative models and appropriate techniques for cooperative working relationships in the school setting. Pertinent legislation and issues of advocacy for the student, parent, and teacher will be explored and applied to current principles for the development of educational programming for students with disabilities. Clinicals: Course embedded: 3 hours.  Pre-requisite: ED 320.  Fee.

ED 334 (3) Early Childhood Education of Special Populations—Overview of the special needs of young children including the discussions of historical and empirical support for providing early intervention services; assessment, instructional methodologies, family involvement and including children with and without disabilities. Attention will be given to assessing and assisting achievement of cognitive, language, social, and motor skills. Clinicals: Course embedded: 4 hours.  Pre-requisite: ED 320.  Fee.

ED 338 (3) Introduction to Students with Learning and Behavior Disabilities—The learning, behavioral, and emotional problems of children and youth are explored in the context of theory, etiology, assessment, and practice. Issues of educational programming and community agency support are considered. Clinicals: Course embedded: 3-5 hours  Pre-requisite: ED 320.  Fee.

ED/EDA 341 (2) Reading and Language Arts Methods and Materials (P-5)—First course of the two-course reading/language arts sequence. A study of current methods and materials useful in teaching children to read, write, and develop proper language skills. The development of reading and language arts programs and appropriate teaching strategies for the primary school students will be emphasized. Time will be given to unit and lesson plans. Pre-requisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.  Clinicals: Course embedded: 5 hours.  Fee. 

ED/EDA 342 (2) Teaching of Reading (P-5)—Direct approaches to the teaching of reading, including phonics and other word identification techniques as well as comprehension strategies Clinicals: Course embedded: 10 hours.  Fee. 

ED/EDA 350 (3) Literacy Assessment (P-5)—An introduction for prospective teachers to methods of language arts assessment. The reading interests and needs of average and exceptional readers are considered, and primary emphasis will focus on the study of current methods and materials useful in analyzing and treating the problems of disabled readers. Time is given to actual in-school diagnosis and remediation of a problem reader that focuses on impact on student learning and culminates in a literacy work sample.  Pre-requisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and ED 341.  Clinicals: Course embedded: 10 hours.  Fee. 

ED/EDA 360 (2) Social Studies Methods and Materials (P-5)—Exploration of methods, materials, and motivational techniques in teaching social studies at the elementary level. Social studies instructional skills are developed through laboratory experiences. Time is given to unit and lesson plans. Pre-requisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. To be taken concurrently with ED 380.  Clinicals: Course embedded: 5 hours.  Fee. 

ED/EDA 380 (3) Elementary Math and Science Methods—Equips the future elementary teacher with appropriate methods, materials, and motivational techniques for the teaching of math and science.  Students will begin to understand what is the nature of mathematics and science, what are appropriate expectations for learning in elementary math and science, what are exemplary teaching and assessment practices that support math and science programs, and what are available materials and resources for the teaching of math and science. Pre-requisites include: Admission to Teacher Education, MAT 202 & 203.  To be taken concurrently with ED 360.  Clinicals: Course embedded: 5 hours.  Fee. 

ED 385 (3) Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum (Middle School and Secondary Education majors)—Establishes methods and techniques for utilization by Middle and Secondary School Teachers to enhance the reading, composition, and writing skills of their students in whatever discipline they teach.  Includes an overview of the various aspects of the reading process and discusses the specialized demands of reading and portfolio development in the content areas.  Pre-requisites: admission to the Teacher Education Program.  Clinicals: Course embedded: 5 hours.  Fee. 

ED/EDA 393 (3) Seminar—Seminars, cross-cultural experiences and special extended field experiences supervised by faculty, with appropriate reading and assessment.  Fee.

ED/EDA 395 (1-3) Extended Clinical-Based Experience—This course extends the field experiences currently integrated within each of the education majors. It will (a) assist the student to connect theory & practice; (b) provide a sense of flow and schedule for a typical school day; (c) enable in-depth and extended interaction with classroom teachers and students, and (d) help the student apply content from methods classes in lesson planning & teaching. Students are involved in planning for and implementing lessons for both small and whole group instruction.  This course also enables candidates who desire additional experiences in urban settings or with students who have diverse learning needs to have those opportunities.  Credit/No Credit.  Contract.  Fee.

ED/EDA 401 (1) Open Inquiry Clinical-Based Experience —This clinical-based experience is designed to enhance the School of Education’s third cluster of courses. Students must complete ED401 the semester PRIOR to Student Teaching to complete a year-long clinical experience.  ED 401 gives teacher education candidates a culminating opportunity to demonstrate their ability to plan, implement, assess, and analyze the inquiry based instruction. Students will spend 75 clinical/field experience hours in variety of authentic settings with an open inquiry work sample project.  A significant portion of this experience is designed to further facilitate our candidates’ ability to work in schools with a high population of P-12 diverse students. This component is taken concurrently with ED 405, 410, and 428. [Beginning Spring 2013] Clinicals: School embedded: 75 hours.  Fee. 

ED/EDA 405 (3) Learning Performance and Assessment—Designed to examine classical learning theories of motivation and cognitive development of human behavior. Future teachers will be trained to interpret the results of standardized achievement tests, create performance-based assessment items, develop teacher-made tests which take into account a student's individual approaches to learning, and analyze the impact on student learning.  An assessment work sample which incorporates a skill set of instructional design, standard-based, unit planning, integration of formative and summative assessment measuring analysis of student learning is a requirement for the course.  Pre-requisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.   Clinicals: Course embedded: 5 hours.  Fee. 

EDA 407 (1) Professional Preparation Seminar—Provides the skills and knowledge to complete a successful student teaching experience.  Candidates will be exposed to the KTIP (Kentucky Teacher Intern Program) evaluation process, will be introduced to the methodology of the teacher work sample, and will work through the transition process from the college classroom setting to the classroom setting of an elementary school.  Credit/No Credit.  Fee.

ED/EDA 410 (2) Classroom Management—Examination of basic discipline technologies for students.  Course emphases will include practical application of effective classroom environments, appropriate selection of management technologies for behavioral remediation, effective teaching styles and teacher behavior, efficient observation and conferencing skills.  Course to be taken prior to student teaching.  Note: The fall semester course focuses on management in the Elementary school, and the spring semester course focuses on management in the middle and secondary school. Clinicals: Course embedded: 10 hours.  Fee. 

ED 415 (3) Assessment for Special Education—This course provides instruction on the various forms of assessment used by a special educator including; administration of standardized individual achievement assessments, techniques for monitoring student progress and IEP benchmarks and various forms of curriculum-based measures.  To demonstrate test administration, interpretation and data analysis of curriculum-based measures, candidates will complete a clinical work sample.  Pre-requisites:  ED 320, 330, 338.  Fee. Clinicals: Course embedded: 10 hours.  Fee. 

ED 416 (3) Methods for Special Populations—This course focuses on direct instruction and student-oriented methodologies for students with mild disabilities.  Emphasis will be placed on metacognitive strategies, appropriate and non-intrusive accommodations, and seamless transitions for collaborative and inclusive settings.  Instructional methodologies that support student achievement in the general core knowledge will be included.  An instructional work sample will provide evidence of the candidate’s competence in designing and accommodating instruction.  Pre-requisites:  ED 320, 330, 338.  Fee. Clinicals: Course embedded: 10 hours .  Fee.

ED/EDA 418 (3) Teaching English as a Second Language Methods and Culture—Addresses current methods and materials for teaching English as a Second Language with a particular emphasis on culturally responsive instruction.  Focuses on theory made practical with a strong emphasis on ethical and intercultural sensitivity.  Includes practicum experiences to ensure classroom confidence and success.  Clinicals: Course embedded: 10 hours.  Fee. 

ED 419 (3) ESL Methods II/Assessment—Addresses methods of assessment for teaching English Learners (EL) with an emphasis on a systemic assessment process as well as ethical and intercultural sensitivity.  Students will be introduced to criteria to ensure consistent identification of EL students, as well as to determine their eligibility, placement and duration of programs and services based on English language proficiency assessment.  Candidates will acquire knowledge and skills related to language proficiency assessments that are linked to the new common curriculum, appropriate standardized assessments and formative and summative assessments used for English Learners.  Candidates will be prepared to analyze assessment results to create intervention plans and to design instruction and monitor progress for English Learners.  This course is designed to provide methods for assessing the effectiveness of school-based language instructional programs to inform future program improvements.  Fee. Clinicals: Course embedded: 10 hours.  Fee. 

ED 420 (3) Secondary/P-12 MethodsCourses by Subject: Biological Science, Chemistry, English, World Language, Mathematics, and Social Studies—The study of methods and materials used in current education and to develop skills in relating these to the teaching-learning process. Aims and objectives for teaching a specific discipline are included as well as courses of study, unit and lesson plans, assessment, and use of equipment. Pre-requisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; [Pre-requisite for language Ed majors: FRN 410, LAT 410, or SPN 410.]  Clinicals: Course embedded: 5-10 hours.  Fee. 

ED 421 (3) Art Methods and Materials (P-12)—A study of visual art for elementary and secondary students. This course includes art fundamentals review, planning for students development in cognitive skills, processes and avenues to art appreciation, and hands-on experience working with various media, methods and materials. Each student presents two lessons with lesson plans; also classroom visitation to area schools for observation and participation is part of the criteria.  Learning of classroom management, such as ordering supplies and equipment, is dealt with. Pre-requisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.  Alternate years.  Fee. Clinicals: Course embedded: 10 hours.  Fee.

ED 422 (3) Instruction for Teaching Physical Education and Health (P-12)—An introduction to methods and materials used in current education and to develop skills in relating these to the teaching-learning process. Aims and objectives for teaching each discipline include unit and lesson plans, assessment, and use of equipment.  Pre-requisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.  Clinicals: Course embedded: 10 hours.  Fee. 

ED 425 (3) Middle School Curriculum and Methodologies—Focuses on curriculum concepts and teaching strategies for students in the middle grades. Attention will be given to the philosophy and educational structure appropriate for the middle grades. Methods and materials related to particular academic emphases will be provided. Time is given to unit and lesson plans.  Pre-requisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.  Clinicals: Course embedded: 5-10 hours.  Fee. 

ED/EDA 428 (2) Interventions for Differentiation—The course focus is the teacher’s role in creating collaborative structures that provide interventions to ensure the learning for each child.  Candidates will analyze Response to Intervention (RTI) for students, as well as analyze and assess effective collaboration models for English Learners (EL) and students with exceptionalities.   To ensure the needs of all students can be met in the regular education classrooms, students will acquire an understanding of language acquisition theories and research based practices for English Learners.  Fee. Clinicals: Course embedded: 3 hours.  Fee. 


STUDENT TEACHING

Student Teaching Admission

Pre-requisite for student teaching course(s):  Student must have a minimum 2.75 GPA. in all coursework: cumulative, the teaching major, and in the professional core. Additionally, students must have successfully completed all other Gate 3 requirements.

Pre-Semester Pre-requisite for All Student Teaching

ISTEPS (Student Teacher Engaging Professional Seminar) a multi-component preparatory seminar held prior to the start of the academic semester which focuses on teaching objectives, classroom procedures, motivation techniques and legal implications for classroom teachers.  Successful completion of ISTEPS is a Pre-requisite to student teaching.

[All education majors register for a minimum of 12 credits in student teaching.]

ED/EDA 498 and 499 (3 – 12) Student Teaching: Professional Clinical-Based Component —Within the professional semester, there will be two components to support and guide the beginning educator.  Component I, “Integration and Reflection Forums,” is a series of 5-7 seminars that focus on practical insights gained through authentic learning during student teaching. Component II involves a minimum of 70 academic days of full-time assignment in an accredited school to observe, to participate, and to teach in classroom settings with special emphasis on the impact of student learning..   

Student teaching placements will be based on the major area requirements:  

- Elementary Education: one in grades P- 3 and one in grades 4 - 5.  (Florida Placements will be one placement in grades K - 6.)

- Middle School Education: two subject area placements in grades 5 - 9.    

- P - 12 Education: one in elementary and one in middle or high school.    

- Secondary Education: one in grades 8 - 12. 

- Dual certification: one in each certification

Successful completion of all components is necessary for degree completion.  Pre-requisites: see above. Fee.

EDS 499 (3-4) Student Teaching MSD: Professional Clinical-Based Component— taken in addition to ED 498 and 499. Students completing the Moderate and Severe Disabilities Certification will be assigned additional student teaching placements in special education.  Successful completion of this component is necessary for MSD certification. Pre-requisites: see above. Fee. 

EDUCATION MSD 

MODERATE/SEVERE DISABILITY EDUCATION AFFILIATE COURSES IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

[See the School of Education for details about this program.]

– the following EDS courses are available at the University of Kentucky, and, through articulation agreement, can be taken by approved Asbury University students, graduate and undergraduate, to enhance an LBD area certification or endorsement. 

(EDS 499 – see under ED Student Teaching above)

EDS 530 (3) Characteristics of Persons with Moderate and Severe Disabilities—A critical examination of the pertinent research in reference to the educational, physical, and psychological nature and needs of the children labeled educable and trainable mentally retarded, including interpretation of psychological tests.  Evaluation of the physical, social, emotional, and mental characteristics of persons with retardation, to assist the classroom teacher to recognize the social potential of each child to the degree that the child with mental disabilities may become less of a burden to himself and society. Affiliate course.

EDS 546 (3) Transdisciplinary Services for Students with Disabilities—Students in this course will identify and discuss critical philosophical issues related to teaching students with disabilities.  Discussion will focus on pertinent information related to planning for this population of students in the areas of communication, physical, health, sensory input and vitality.  This information will be used to plan for a student with disabilities including a transdisciplinary assessment, a person-centered plan, and an activity-based instructional program. Affiliate course.

EDS 548 (3) Curriculum Design for Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities—Educational and adaptive behavior assessment and curriculum prescription for individuals exhibiting moderate intellectual and developmental disabilities. The course participant will acquire skills in the use of current formal and informal educational and adaptive behavior assessment procedures for use in prescribing curriculum, instructional, behavioral intervention with individuals exhibiting moderate intellectual and developmental disabilities. Specific attention will be focused on procedures for using assessment data and curriculum prescription that enhances the full inclusion of school age individuals with disabilities with their non-disabled peers. Affiliate course.

EDUCATIONAL MINISTRIES

EM 220 (3) Teaching in the Church—An introduction to the educational ministry of the church, with a focus on the act of teaching as a means for leading people to Christ and to maturity in their Christian walk. Students will explore basic principles of learning and human development, curriculum design and varieties of methodology, as well as structures for Christian growth and learning in the Church. Fall.

EM 280 (3) Foundations for Educational Ministry—A study of cultural, theological, philosophical, and psychological concepts foundational to the field of educational ministry. Spring.

EM 340 (3) Children's Ministry—A study of the nature and needs of childhood with special attention to principles of nurturing and enriching the moral and spiritual development of the child. Students gain skills in planning the Church's ministry to, by, and with children. Fall.

EM 350 (3) Youth Ministry—An analysis of contemporary youth culture, peer syndrome, personal identity and value development with principles and skills of creative youth ministry methodology.  Emphasis is given to evangelism and spiritual growth of adolescents, toward the goal of full involvement in the Church. Fall.

EM 360 (3) Adult Ministry—An examination of the periods of adulthood from the perspective of needs, developmental tasks and spiritual formation. Includes program development and a study of principles which promote the integration of all adults into the community of faith. Spring.

EM 401 (2) Curriculum and Resources—A study of the biblical, theological, and historical foundations of church/ministry curriculum and resources. Opportunity is provided for students to critique and write curriculum, as well as to observe the commercial development of materials for the Christian market. Fee. Odd-numbered years, Fall.

ENGINEERING MATH

EMA ___ —denotes affiliated course in conjunction with the University of Kentucky.

ENGLISH

[ENG courses registered as ENA have a fee attached.]

ENG 100 (3) Introduction to Composition—To increase proficiency in communication skills, with emphasis on grammar and writing. The course may include reading assignments of essays as models for student writing.  Required of all freshmen with ACT/SAT English scores of 17/340 through 21/500. Students will be enrolled concurrently in, and must successfully complete, the Writing Center Tutoring Program.  Students completing ENG 100 are required to proceed to ENG 110 during the next semester of enrollment.

ENG 110 (3) Exposition and Research—A writing-centered course that aims to develop the written communication skills vital to functioning successfully in contemporary society, whether in the context of university classes, business, industry, or in private life. Concentrates on expository and argumentative writing, and deals, as needed, with matters of sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, and grammatical usage. Concludes with an essay employing research and documentation. Required of freshman with ACT/SAT English scores from 22/510 through 26/650. Pre-requisite: placement scores or ENG 100

ENG 151 (3) Advanced Exposition and Research—An advanced composition course centered around expository and argumentative writing, using traditional patterns such as narration, description, and analysis.  Concludes with an essay employing research and documentation.  Special attention given to the nature of good writing, sentence and paragraph precision, and style.  Required of freshmen with ACT/SAT scores of 27/660 or above.  Not for students who have completed ENG 110.

ENG/ENA 200 (3) Introduction to Teaching English as a Second Language—Presents theories of language learning and factors which impede language learning.  Designed to provide theoretical and practical experience in language acquisition.  Students will provide tutorial assistance to non-native English speakers.  Pre-requisite:  completion of ENG 110 or 151.

ENG 205 (3) Literature and Culture—A survey of selected literature of the Western World from the ancients to the present.  Designed to provide the student with an in-depth exposure to literary works that have shaped contemporary culture.  Pre-requisite:  ENG 110 or 151.

ENG 230 (3) Introduction to Literature—An initial course in the art of critical reading.  A survey of genres (fiction, poetry, drama) which lays a foundation for the upper-division course work in the major, it is designed to assist entry-level students (or the interested non-major) to develop the skills and techniques of effective literary analysis.

ENG 231 (3) The British Literary Tradition I—An historical survey of English literature from its beginnings to the Romantic movement, tracing the development of literary traditions and techniques, intellectual history, and major movements.

ENG 232 (3) The British Literary Tradition II—A continuation of the study begun in English 231, beginning with the Romantic movement and continuing to the present.

ENG/ENA 240 (3) Grammar and Composition for Elementary Teachers—Instruction in the teaching of composition as process in the elementary classroom.  Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course will include a thorough review of basic grammar and a strong focus on ways to integrate grammar with the writing process.  Instruction will provide a guide through drafting revision, and editing in modes developmentally appropriate for elementary students.  Assessment strategies that foster student growth will be presented with focus on the use of the portfolio for classroom and system wide assessment.

ENG 241 (3) Introduction to Creative Writing—Fiction— Introduction to the writing of fiction through the study of professional models, specific writing assignments, and instructor critique.  Pre-requisites: ENG 110 or 151.

ENG 242 (3) Introduction to Creative Writing—Poetry— Introduction to the writing of poetry through the study of professional models, specific writing assignments, and instructor critique.  Pre-requisites: ENG 110 or 151.  Alternate years.

ENG 250 (3) Writing for Teachers—Instruction in the teaching of composition in English classes for the middle school and secondary school teacher.  Includes introduction to research methods and documentation for English education, contemporary theories about composition pedagogy, revision and editing methods, and practice in writing styles and writing modes. 

ENG 261 (3) American Literature I—A general survey of American literature from the early Colonial period to the time of Walt Whitman (up to 1860).

ENG 262 (3) American Literature II—A general survey of American literature from the time of Walt Whitman to the present (since 1860).

ENG 300 (3) Writing for the Professions—Recognizing the essential nature of effective written communication in any work environment, this course focuses on the various types of writing required in professional settings.  The course emphasizes the production of clear, persuasive, and correct documents that professionals use to communicate dynamically and efficiently.  It also focuses on the elimination of grammar and usage errors not accepted in professional environments.  Finally, it includes opportunities to interact with professionals in chosen fields, ranging from arts or nonprofit organizations to communications outlets and corporate settings.

ENG 311 (3) The English Novel—A study of the technique and historical development of the novel of England from its beginning to the close of the 19th Century. (alternate years)

ENG 315 (3) Film As Literature—Teaches students to recognize and analyze the narrative, visual, and aural elements of film.  To illustrate the breadth of film’s expressive potential, the class will present a variety of film styles (Classic Hollywood, realism, expressionism, avant garde, and documentary) over the course of the semester and consider how external forces (economics, politics, culture, etc.) shape film aesthetics and reception.  Includes schools of film theory.

ENG 322 (3) Victorian Period—Representative writers from 1830 to about 1900. (alternate years)

ENG/ENA 331 (3) Linguistics and Advanced Grammar—An introduction to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of the English language. Required of all majors and emphases in teaching English.

ENG 335 (3) Sound Systems of Language—Phonetics involves the study of human speech sounds, including articulatory phonetics, acoustic phonetics, and auditory phonetics.  Phonology is the study of sound systems of languages, including how phonemes and allophones form integrated systems in particular languages resulting in differences from one language to another.  Pre-requisite: ENG 331.

ENG 336 (3) Grammatical Structure of Language—Morphology is the word formation system of languages, including how morpheme and allomorphs form integrated systems in particular languages resulting in differences from one language to another.  The study moves to syntax and how these smaller units are used to form sentences and how sentences relate to one another.  Pre-requisite: ENG 331.

ENG 340 (3) Modern Poetry—A survey of contemporary American and British poetry, with particular emphasis on the various aspects of the poetic movement of the present. (alternate years)

ENG 342 (3) The American Novel—A study of the history and technique of the novel in America from its beginning to the close of the 19th Century. (alternate years)

ENG 345 (3) Modern Novel—A study of the major trends in the American, English, and continental novel from 1900 with special emphasis on the novel as a literary and artistic form. (alternate years)

ENG 348 (3) Contemporary Literature—A study of British and American Literature since 1950.  The course will focus on poetry, prose, and drama. (alternate years)

ENG 353 (3) Creative Writing for Young PeopleIncludes a variety of exemplary examples of creative writing for young people, including both fiction and poetry.  In-class workshops will give opportunity to share their responses to writing prompts, to receive feedback on writing, and to offer comments and suggestions on the work of classmates.  Requires a number of original works for critique, revision, and polishing.  Class time will also be given to exploring markets for this type of writing and on finding appropriate venues where projects may be submitted. (alternate years)

ENG/ENA 360 (3) Children's Literature (P-5)—A survey of the various types of literature suitable for presentation to children of the elementary school level. The course is designed particularly for those who are planning to work with children in the elementary school.

ENG 361 (3) Adolescent Literature—Survey of literature from various genres for use in middle/high school. To prepare teachers for the tasks of assisting students in the transition from children’s literature to adult reading and guiding adolescents in the development of appreciation for well written literature.

ENG 362 (3) American Multi-Ethnic Literature—A survey of American minority literature, including African-American, Native American, Hispanic-American and Asian-American writers, from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. (alternate years)

ENG 370 (3) Medieval Literature—Critical study of Anglo-Saxon and Middle English periods.  Emphasis on historical context and major genres, including epic, romance, lyric, drama, and histories. (alternate years)

ENG 371 (3) Intermediate Creative Writing—Fiction —This course builds on the foundation of ENG 241, allowing the student to gain further practice in the writing of fiction and non-fiction  through the study of professional models, specific writing assignments, workshops, and instructor critique.  Pre-requisite: ENG 241.

ENG 372 (3) Intermediate Creative Writing—Poetry —This course builds on the foundation of ENG 242, allowing the student to gain further practice in the writing of poetry through the study of professional models, specific writing assignments, workshops, and instructor critique.  Pre-requisite: ENG 242.  Alternate years.

ENG 375 (3) Renaissance Literature—A study of the representative writers of the English Renaissance from More to Jonson, excluding Shakespeare, with special emphasis on the Christian humanists. (alternate years)

ENG 378 (3) Milton and the Seventeenth Century—A study of the principal writers of the 17th century.  A major emphasis of the course will be a study of Milton’s poetry and prose and his development as a writer with major emphasis on Paradise Lost, giving attention to both his artistic quality and his theology. (alternate years)

ENG 382 (3) Reason and Revolution: Studies in the Longer Eighteenth Century—Many  current political, social, and economic structures have their origins in 18th-century British culture, and this course explores all of these and more through the political and social satire of writers such as Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope, the political and social cartoon work of William Hogarth, the social commentary of Restoration comedies, and the social and philosophical explorations of the early Romantic poets such as William Blake and William Wordsworth.  Main readings will be supplemented with samplings from writers and theorists such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, and Samuel Johnson. (alternate years) 

ENG 391 (1-3) Independent Study—A directed and supervised investigation of a selected research problem or issue in the field of English.  A student may not take more than four (4) hours of independent study. Contract.

ENG 393 (1-3) Seminar—A study of one major author, or a small circle of authors or a literary movement, the subject to be determined by the staff. Credit for this course may be given more than once.

ENG 402 (3) ESL Practicum—An off-campus, intensive opportunity to apply  skills in an authentic setting with individuals for whom English is a second language.  This clinical/field experience may be arranged with a local ESL population or in an international context.  Pre-requisite: ENG 200.  Contract.

ENG 403 (1) Practicum in Creative Writing—An experiential learning opportunity that may take one of two forms.  Students may volunteer their writing abilities at a community or adult learning center.  They may help with literary readings, publicity, tutoring and other writing-related tasks.  Each hour of credit requires 34 hours of contact.  Alternatively, students may attend a creative writing conference during which they will have their own work critiqued and hear published authors.  The conference must be at least three days and be approved by the professor.  Repeatable.

ENG 410 (3) Shakespeare—A study of the principal plays of Shakespeare read in the light of dramatic and literary conditions of his time.

ENG 423 (3) C. S. Lewis and the Oxford Circle—A study of literature inspired by a Christian vision of life.  Focuses primarily on the writings of C.S. Lewis and secondarily on the Oxford Circle of writers with whom he was associated. (alternate years)

ENG 431 (3) Literary Criticism—A study of the philosophy of literary composition from various sources, designed to give students an understanding of the principles which underlie literary composition and to enable them to form a basis for evaluating the literature which they meet in their own personal reading.

ENG 450 (2) Advanced Studies in Creative Writing— Students will analyze their current body of work and write additional pieces in preparation for a final portfolio worthy of being submitted to a graduate school or a publisher.  Pre-requisite: ENG 241 or 242.

ENG 475 (3) Senior Seminar—A capstone experience for the English major, this course will address literary topics and critical approaches, with a view toward deeper integration of faith, learning, and vocation.

ENSEMBLES

ENS 101 (.5–1) Collegium Musicum—General name under which all of the instrumental chamber groups function.  Combinations vary each semester.  By audition and as openings occur.  Ensembles may be combined.  Minimum of one-hour weekly rehearsals. 

ENS 111 (.5-1) Women's Choir—Open to all women students, staff, and faculty by audition.  In addition to local concerts, this ensemble will tour periodically.  Fee.

ENS 131 (.5-1) Men's Glee Club—Open to all male students without audition.  In addition to local concerts, this ensemble will tour periodically.  Fee.

ENS 141 (.5-1) Concert Band—Open to all qualified students by audition.  In addition to local concerts, this ensemble will tour periodically. 

ENS 151 (.5-1) Orchestra—Open to all qualified students by audition. The heart of the group is the string section. Woodwind, brass, percussion, and keyboard players are added on a per composition basis. The literature studied and performed is from the classical tradition, baroque to the present.  Fee.

ENS 161 (.5-1) Chorale—The Asbury Chorale is an SATB ensemble open to all students by audition.  Repertoire consists of challenging choral literature from various style periods.  The Chorale supplements its on-campus performance schedule with occasional off-campus events and tours.  Fee.

ENS 171 (.5-1) Handbell Choir—Open to all students by audition. In addition to local concerts, this ensemble tours periodically.  Fee.

ENS 191 (.5-1) Jazz Ensemble—Open to all qualified students through audition.  In addition to local concerts, this ensemble will tour periodically.

EQUINE STUDIES

EQM 100 (3) Equine Studies—An introduction to the basic aspects of the equine industry, covering the history and development of the horse, breeds, anatomy, nutrition, lameness, body condition scoring, reproduction, classifying horses according to their function, behavior and genetics.  Buildings and equipment used in the production and training of horses will be discussed along with career opportunities available in the equine industry.

EQM 121 (1) Mission Farm I—This is an introductory experiential study of the process of establishing and running a sustainable farm.  Knowledge about food production and how it can be used to begin and foster relationships especially in the context of mission will be presented.  Students will acquire skills needed to plan, establish, maintain and harvest a garden.  There will be an emphasis on transferability of this knowledge to other cultures, especially on the mission field.

EQM 122 (1) Mission Farm II— This is a continuation of the fall Mission Farm Project class.  More advanced topics in sustainable farming will be covered in the context of developing the farm and transferring these principles to the mission field.  Fundamentals of small livestock husbandry will be covered especially with regard to the role they play in sustainable farming.      

EQM 200 (3) Horsemanship Ministry—Training of dedicated Christians to conduct safe, efficient, and effective horsemanship programs as a tool of Christian Ministry.  Designed to equip each equine student with the necessary tools to successfully manage, train, and teach in a variety of equestrian ministry settings. Fee

EQM 201 (3) Equine Conformation and Selection—Conformation of the horse is covered in detail and its relationship to “form follows function”.  This is a complete evaluation of all aspects of the horse’s anatomy and how it is related to its function and purpose.  Individual breed characteristics are covered and why they are important to that breed.  The different gaits of breeds will be covered.

EQM 202 (3) Stable ManagementBasic principles of establishing a business plan, creating a safe and satisfying environment, applying practical and economic horse keeping techniques and maximizing your efforts for a successful operation. Fee.

EQM 205 (3) Forage Management & Feeding Horses—This course covers the basic nutritional requirements and the practical feeding of horses; including the studies of the basic classes of feeds.  The role that pastures play in a well planned feeding program will be investigated along with proper management of those pastures.  Evaluating forages and understanding a forage analysis in relation to feeding will be included.

EQM 206 (3) Equine Health and First AidComprehensive course to explain routine but essential health care, basic first aid, and how to identify urgent medical conditions. Fee.

EQM 208 (3) Introduction to Therapeutic Riding—Progressive instruction for building a skill foundation in therapeutic riding instruction.  North American Riding for the Handicapped Association Certification and Standards including the use of therapy horses, tack and other equipment. Fee.

EQM 245 (3) Riding Instructor Certification—Students complete a 40 hour certification clinic.  Teaching and equitation skills in ring and trail riding. Pre-requisites: PE/EQM 130 & 131. Fee.

EQM 251 (3) Horse Training—Establishing horse training goals and programs.  Positive and progressive approach to horsemanship including handling, ground lessons, and obedience under saddle. Fee.

EQM 253 (2) Police Horse Training 1This course covers the basics of using natural horsemanship to prepare a horse for a career as a police mount.  Police Mount Training Level 1 is focused on the safe handling of the horse on the ground.  The training covers leading, desensitizing, and control of the horse in every direction over obstacles. Pre-requisite: EQM 100.

EQM 254 (2) Police Horse Training 2This course builds on the natural horsemanship skills learned in Police Mount Training Level 1 to prepare a  horse for a career as a police mount.  Police Mount Training Level 2 is focused on fundamental ground manner and the skills needed to move the horse in various directions.  The training covers tying, trailering, navigating obstacles, controlling the horse’s motion with lateral movement, and round penning. Pre-requisite: EQM 253.

EQM 255 (2) Police Horse Training 3This course builds on the natural horsemanship skills learned in Police Mount Training Level 1 and 2 to prepare a horse for a career as a police mount.  Police Mount Training Level 3 is focused on teaching a horse to respond to trainer cues in preparation for riding.  The training covers driving in long-lines, navigating obstacles, controlling the horse at the walk, trot, and canter on a circle, and trailering.  Pre-requisite: EQM 254.

EQM 256 (2) Police Horse Training 4This course builds on the natural horsemanship skills learned in Police Mount Training Level 1, 2, and 3 to prepare a horse for a career as a police mount.  Police Mount Training Level 4 is focused on teaching the horse to respond to trainer cues under saddle.  The training covers balanced riding at the walk, trot and canter, riding through obstacles, through a variety of terrain, and on patrol in town. Pre-requisite: EQM 255.

EQM 261 (3) Equine Anatomy & Physiology—This course will be a study of the anatomy and physiology of the horse.  A systems approach will be used including the musculoskeletal, digestive, respiratory, circulatory, reproductive, endocrine, integument, nervous and blood.  Some comparative anatomy will also be included.

EQM 306 (3) Equine Diseases—This course is designed to review the basic anatomy and physiology of the equine species and how to identify health-related conditions of the horse.  Most of the course will be taught through an “anatomical systems” approach with the exception of reproduction, foaling, and pediatrics.

EQM 310 (3) Farm and Ranch Management—Resource Management of land, water, and facilities involved in equine programs.  The primary goals will be to train equine managers, and to develop a focus on natural resource systems with the overall aim to increase efficient farm or ranch management. Fee.

EQM 311 (1) Advanced Instruction in Therapeutic Riding—This course is a practical and supervised application to therapeutic riding.  This hands-on class will allow students to acquire skill and technique in preparation and delivery of therapeutic riding lessons.  It will be taught in conjunction with the Jessamine Connection riding lessons. Pre-requisite EQM 208 and EQM 245 Contract. 

EQM 320 (3) Equine Administration—Study of equestrian business, equestrian organizations, breed associations, facility and event management operations, conventions and programs. Fee.

EQM 340 (3) Equine Law—This course covers the broad spectrum of legal situations and laws that govern the equine industry.  It will provide students with a basic understanding of methods of settling disputes, relevant tort law, business structures, record keeping, contracts, liens, tax liabilities, and estate planning.  The course will also cover the equine professional’s rights and responsibilities, relevant legal definitions and terms, how to recognize when to use legal counsel, and how to avoid liability and prevent situations that could result in costly litigation.

EQM 391 (1-3) Independent Study—A directed and supervised investigation of a selected problem/topics in the area of Equine Management.  Available to senior EQM majors or minors.  A student may take up to six (6) hours of independent studies. Contract.

EQM 393 (1-3) Seminar—The study of various issues/topics in the field of equine management.  Topics will be determined and announced for each semester a seminar is offered.

EQM 406 (3) Equine Lameness and Hoof Care—This course will study the causes, treatment, and management of lameness issues in the equine species.  Students will also gain knowledge on the fundamentals of hoof trimming and horseshoeing through lecture and laboratory sessions.

EQM 420 (3) Equine Reproduction Management—This course will focus on the equine breeding operation primarily from a management perspective and secondarily investigate the medical management of reproduction.

EQM 435 (3-6) Equine Field Experience—A directed field experience at Asbury University or at another location with departmental approval.  Students are responsible for total care of the horses including feeding, as well as maintaining stables and facilities including programming for one semester.  240 hours.  Contract.  Fee.

EQM 451(3) Equine Exercise Physiology & Conditioning— This course will cover advanced physiology of skeletal, muscular, and connective tissues along with advanced study of cardiac and respiratory systems. The effect of exercise upon the training responses, and practical applications of these responses will be demonstrated on horses used in class.  Pre-requisites: EQM 100, EQM 251, EQM 261.               

EQM 475 (1) Equine Senior Seminar—A capstone course that brings all aspects of the Equine curriculum into perspective so students can prepare to enter the industry upon graduation.  Students will be given the opportunity to evaluate their experiences in the program and to suggest changes to improve the curriculum.  Students will also submit their portfolios covering their enrollment in the university.

EARTH SCIENCE

ESC 150 (3) Earth Science—An examination of planet Earth, including its place in space (astronomy).  Topics include the rock cycle, tectonics, geologic time, oceanography, meteorology, formation of the solar system, and the life of stars.  ESC 150/151 satisfies the foundational requirement for a natural science. Three hours lecture per week. Co-requisite: ESC 151.

ESC 151 (1) Earth Science Lab—Laboratory experience designed to complement ESC 150.  Reinforces concepts presented in lecture.  Students receive hands-on experience with instruments, maps, minerals, rocks and fossils.  One three-hour lab per week. Co-requisite: ESC 150. Fee.

ESC 290 (2) Rocky Mountain Experience—Field course in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Colorado.  A seven day backpacking trip showcases landforms shaped by wind, water and glaciers.  Past and present tectonic forces are evident.  Environments from desert to tundra are also observed. Park management and outdoor living skills also emphasized. Conducted during the second and third weeks of May. May be substitued for ESC 151, Earth Science Lab, to meet the laboratory component of the sciences foundational natural science requirement. Fee.

ESC 391A (2) Directed Study in Geology—This course extends, and develops in detail, the concepts introduced in ESC 150.  Topics include mineral and rock cycles, landforms, glacial and volcanic activity, plate tectonics, earth history, and climatology.  Pre-requisites: ESC 150 and permission of instructor.

ESC 391B (2) Directed Study in Astronomy—This course extends, and develops in detail, the concepts introduced in ESC 150.  Topics include constellations and major stars, orbital motion, objects in the solar system, spectroscopy, the structure and classification of stars, galaxies, and cosmology.  Pre-requisites: ESC 150 and permission of instructor.

EXERCISE SCIENCE

EXS 228 (1) Practicum—Forty (40) hours of practical experience and observation in selected professional settings.  Contract.

EXS 350 (3) Physical Fitness Assessment and Prescription—Methods and techniques used to enhance physical fitness and physical performance capacities.  Includes assessment, training techniques, exercise prescriptions, enhancement of health and skill related areas of fitness.

EXS 371 (3) Motor Learning and Development—A study of the principles of motor learning that affect acquisition and performance of skilled movement in sports and physical education and recreational activities.  Fee.

EXS 393 (3) Seminar: Advanced Principles of Strength and Conditioning—Topics and issues in human performance. Topics will be determined and announced for each semester a seminar course is offered.

EXS 420 (3) Physiology of Exercise—A study of the body's physiological responses to exercise with emphasis on the proper methods of obtaining optimal levels of performance.  One additional hour of lab required per week.  Pre-requisites:  BIO 100 or 202 (preferred), BIO 262, BIO 331/333 and PED 210 or permission. CHE 121/123 and 122/124 highly recommended. Fee.

EXS 431 (3) Kinesiology/Biomechanics—The anatomical and mechanical analysis of human motion with emphasis on analyzing and improving athletic performance with application of mechanics to the structure and function of the human body.  One additional hour of lab required per week.  Pre-requisite: BIO 100 or 202 (preferred), BIO 262, BIO 331/333 or permission. PHY 201 and 202 highly recommended. Fee.

EXS 435 (2-3) Internship—Directed professional field experience in Exercise Science (80 clock hours minimum); Pre-requisites: EXS 228, 350, 420, and senior standing. Application process required; departmental approval. Contract.

EXS 475 (2) Senior Seminar—A course for Exercise Science majors where students are asked to integrate and assess their skills, experience, and professional knowledge.  Application processes for certification exams and graduate school are also facilitated.  Fee. 

FINE ARTS

FA 100 (3) Understanding Music and Art or  [may be split: FA 101 (1.5) Art & Culture; FA 102 (1.5) Music & Culture]—Designed for the liberal arts student.  Presents a rudimentary knowledge of the elements and principles used in music and art.  Provides a philosophical basis for understanding the arts with considerable time spent viewing art and listening to music.  Fee.

FRENCH

FRN 101 (3) Elementary French I—An introduction to the study of French with emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This course is designed for students who have never studied French.

FRN 102 (3) Elementary French II—Review and expansion of French grammar, composition, and conversation. Pre-requisite: FRN 101, two years of high school French, or placement by examination.

FRN 201 (3) Intermediate French—Continued development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in French with a cross-cultural emphasis. Pre-requisite: FRN 102 or placement by examination.

FRN 291 (3) Advanced Intermediate French—Designed to familiarize students with grammatical structures and syntax not mastered in elementary or intermediate French.  Special attention will be given to enhancing student skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing, as well as the acquisition of cultural and literary knowledge.  Enable students to move smoothly into courses at the 300-level and beyond.  Pre-requisite: FRN 201, college placement examination, or permission of instructor.

FRN 301 (3) French Composition and Conversation—Intensive practice in both oral and written French communication. Pre-requisite: FRN 291 or placement by examination.

Pre-requisite for courses above 301: Completion of FRN 301 or permission of professor.

FRN 302 (3) Advanced French Grammar and Composition—Review and study of advanced French grammar topics with intensive practice in writing French prose for a variety of purposes.  Pre-requisite: FRN 301.

FRN 311 (3) Survey of French Literature I—A chronological overview of French literature from the Middle Ages through the Eighteenth Century.

FRN 312 (3) Survey of French Literature II—A chronological overview of French literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries.

FRN 323 (3) Introduction to French Civilization—A survey of French history from the Roman conquest of Gaul to the present followed by an overview of contemporary French civilization.

FRN 371 (1) French Listening Comprehension and Conversation Practice—Extensive practice viewing and discussing French-language films. Class meets two hours per week. Credit/No Credit. Course may be repeated for credit; may be counted only once toward major or minor. Pre-requisite:  FRN 301 or permission of instructor.

FRN 372 (1) French Listening Comprehension and Conversation Practice—A continuation of FRN 371. Extensive practice viewing and discussing French-language films. Class meets two hours per week. Credit/No Credit. May be repeated for credit. May be counted only once toward major or minor. Pre-requisite:  FRN 301 or permission of instructor.

FRN 391 (1-3) Independent Study—Independent study in a specialized field in consultation with supervising professor.  Pre-requisite: Completion of at least one 300-level French course and a 3.0 GPA in French courses or permission of professor. Contract.

FRN 393 (1-3) Seminar—A course designed for advanced French students with the area of concentration to be determined by the staff.  Credit for this course may be given more than once.

FRN 403 (3) French Linguistics—Introduction to the study of linguistics with reference to the French language. Analysis of French phonology, morphology, and syntax. 

FRN 410 (3) French P-12 Teaching Methods—An introduction to the methods and materials used in teaching French in elementary, middle and high schools. Pre-requisites: FRN 301, ED 200, 201, 230 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Course does not count toward the advanced French hours required for the non-teaching major in French.  Field component.

FRN 430 (3) Advanced French Literary Topics—Important literary works from a variety of genres are read and analyzed. Content varies. May be repeated for credit. 

FRN 475 (1) Senior Seminar–—A course for all World Languages majors where students are asked to integrate and assess their skills with literature, language, and culture. Required of all World Languages majors.

GEOGRAPHY 

GEO 211 (3) Principles of Geography—A study of geography using primarily a balanced approach between physical and cultural geography, designed primarily for the elementary and middle school teacher and for the concentration in the social studies emphasis.

GREEK

GRK 101 (3) Elementary Greek I—An introduction to ancient Greek with an emphasis on grammatical foundations. This course is designed for students who have never studied Greek.

GRK 102 (3) Elementary Greek II—Grammatical review and expansion of Elementary Greek I. Pre-requisite: GRK 101 or placement by examination.

GRK 201 (3) Intermediate Greek I—Development of translation skills in ancient Greek literature with special emphasis on passages from the New Testament.  Pre-requisite: GRK 102 or placement by examination.

GRK 202 (3) Intermediate Greek II—A continuation of GRK 201. Pre-requisite: GRK 201 or placement by examination.

GRK 301 (3) Readings in Greek Literature I—Readings in Greek literature from the classical period, including such authors as Xenophon, Hesiod, Herodotus, and Pindar. Pre-requisite: GRK 202 or permission of the professor.

GRK 302 (3) Readings in Greek Literature II—A comprehensive reading of classical Greek literature in such authors as Plato, Aristotle, and Philo. Pre-requisite: GRK 301 or permission of the professor.

GRK 391 (1-3) Independent study—Independent study in a specialized field in consultation with supervising professor.  Requirements usually include assigned readings combined with a research paper.  Pre-requisite: Completion of GRK 202 and a 3.0 GPA in Greek courses or permission of the professor.  Contract.

GRK 393 (1-3) Seminar—A course designed for advanced students with the area of concentration to be determined by the staff. Credit for this course may be given more than once.

GRK 401 (3) Readings in Greek Literature III—Advanced grammar, syntax, and readings in such classical authors as Euripides, Sophocles, Aristophanes, and Homer. Pre-requisite: GRK 302 or permission of the professor.

GRK 402 (3) Readings in Greek Literature IV—Advanced grammar, syntax, and readings in such ancient authors as Thucydides, Aeschylus, and Achilles Tatius. Pre-requisite: GRK 401 or permission of the professor.

HEBREW 

HEB 101 (3) Elementary Hebrew I—An introduction to Biblical Hebrew with an emphasis on grammatical foundations. This course is designed for students who have never studied Hebrew.

HEB 102 (3) Elementary Hebrew II—Grammatical review and expansion of Elementary Hebrew I. Pre-requisite: HEB 101 or advanced placement.

HEB 201 (3) Intermediate Hebrew—Development of translation skills in Hebrew literature with special emphasis on passages from the Old Testament. Pre-requisite: HEB 102 or advanced placement.

HEB 301 (3) Advanced Hebrew Reading—A close reading of selected passages from the Hebrew Bible.  Emphasis will be placed upon developing translational and interpretive skills.  Pre-requisite: HEB 201, permission of instructor, or advanced placement.

HEB 391 (1-3) Independent study—Independent study in a specialized field in consultation with supervising professor.  Requirements usually include assigned readings combined with a research paper.  Pre-requisite: Completion of HEB 201 and a 3.0 GPA in Hebrew courses or by permission of professor.  Contract.

HEALTH EDUCATION 

HED 231 (3) Injury Care and Safety—Science of prevention, evaluation, management and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.  Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the mechanisms of injury and on acquiring practical training room skills.  Includes American Red Cross Community CPR and First Aid certifications. Requires a field component.  Fee.

HED 282 (3) Community Environmental Health—Basic view into community health and environmental issues.  Discussions include: personal health, community and national health organizations, the nation’s health profile, health care systems and other basic community health related issues. Covers the study of the environment and the human impact on it and how it relates to the individual and global health.  Requires a field component.

HED 299 (3) Contemporary Health Issues—Psychological, social, and physical implications of health education. Emphasis on creative teaching as well as the professional organizations associated with health education.  Studies the theory and practice of selecting, organizing, and teaching health.  Discussions include:  consumer health issues, choosing reliable products and services, distinguish between valid and questionable information in the media and internet.  Requires a field component.

HED 312 (3) Nutrition for Health and Human Performance—Study of nutrition and its relationship to health and physical performance.  Covers nutrition throughout the life span and relation to the enhancement of health, fitness, and sport performance.  Recommended dietary intakes, supplements, ergogenic aids, special populations, weight control, weight loss and weight gain. Fee.

HED 322 (2) HPE in the Elementary School—Materials, methods, and practice in health and physical education activities suitable for use in the classroom, gymnasium and playground by children in the elementary school. Requires a field component.

HED 393 (3) Health Seminar—A discussion of selected topics and issues in the area of health education.  Topics may vary for each semester the course is offered. Requires a field component.

HED 400 (3) Human Behaviors and Relationships—Emphasizes mental and emotional health, human sexuality and relationships.  Prepares the future health educator to teach the components of mental and emotional health and the relationship between health and human sexuality.

HISTORY

HIS 101 (3) Western Civilization I—An introductory survey of social, intellectual, aesthetic, religious, and institutional developments of the western world up to the seventeenth century.  The course will explore the foundational contributions made to the civilization of the West by the Greeks and Romans, as well as examine the rise and growth of the Christian faith and its impact on the Medieval and Reformation eras.  The course concludes with a discussion of the Renaissance and the discovery of the Americas and how these developments prepared the West for the coming of the modern era.

HIS 102 (3) Western Civilization II—A continuation of the study of western civilization that begins in the seventeenth century and concludes with the contemporary era.  The course will describe the settling of religious differences in Europe, the Age of the Enlightenment, the emergence of nation-states, and the growth of nationalism and western imperialism in the opening centuries of the modern age.  The course concludes by exploring the twentieth century and the impact of totalitarian ideologies, world wars, and the emergence of minority and Third World issues.

HIS 200 (3) Leadership in History—A presentation of principles of leadership, which draws upon current literature in the field as well as historical materials to explain the understanding of leadership in historical context, and using examples of leadership drawn from history. The material will be introductory in nature.  No previous knowledge of history is needed.

HIS 201 (3) History of the United States to 1876An introductory survey from Elizabethan times to the period of reconstruction.

HIS 202 (3) History of the United States since 1876—A continuation of HIS 201 from 1876 to the present.

HIS 298 (3) The American Civil War—A detailed examination of the American Civil War, including military, diplomatic and social aspects of the conflict.  Important issues raised by the causes of the War and its conduct are given special attention.

HIS 311 (3) War in the American Memory—Wars have always cast long shadows over American history.  Battles over the meaning and memory of wars have shaped American culture and politics long after the actual bullets have stopped flying.  The memory of wars—how the participants and subsequent generations perceive them, what we collectively remember and what we forget—may be as important as the wars themselves in influencing American culture.  This course will examine the memory of wars in American history from the colonial period to the present.  Memory manifests itself broadly in culture—in politics, literature, art, monuments, and film.  Thus, we will take a multidisciplinary approach, using art, fiction, and film.  We will ask questions such as:  How has the memory of various wars shaped American politics, culture, and society?  In turn, how has American culture influenced the way that wars are remembered?  How do factors such as race, religion, class, gender, and region influence the ways in which individuals and the larger culture remember war?

HIS 313 (3) History of Religion in the United States—A study of the growth, development and spread of religion in the US from colonial times to the present.

HIS 316 (3) The United States in the 1960’s—“History with a capital H had come down to earth, “ wrote New Leftist Todd Gitlin of the 1960s.”People were living with a supercharged density.”  This course probes the decade’s ferment, exploring the political, economic, social, cultural, and religious development of the United States from roughly 1960 to 1974.  Placing the era in historical and global perspective, this course covers major events and trends including John F. Kennedy’s New Frontier, Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society, the civil rights and feminist movements, the Vietnam War, the New Left, the counterculture, Richard Nixon and Watergate, and the seeds of the New Right.

HIS 318 (3) History of American Foreign Relations—An overview of international relations theory, and the diplomatic and military history of the United States. 

HIS 319 (3) History of the American South to 1865—An examination of the cultural, social and political institutions that shaped the American South from colonial days through the Civil War. Special attention will be devoted to a study of the slave system and how it influenced the development of the South as a particular American cultural system.

HIS 320 (3) Ancient History—A study of the development of Mediterranean Civilization from its inception to the dissolution of the western half of the Roman Empire. Pre-requisite: HIS 101.

HIS 321 (3) History of Christianity—A study of the growth of the Christian Church from the Council of Nicea to the present with emphasis on the formation of orthodoxy and its interrelation to surrounding society.

HIS 322 (3) Medieval Civilization—An examination of the formation and mutation of the salient features of medieval society. Pre-requisite: HIS 101 or consent of the professor.

HIS 323 (3) History of Early Britain—An overall survey of British political, social and cultural history from Roman times to the end of the Tudor Reign.

HIS 325 (3) From Caesar to Charlemagne: the Origins of France—A survey of the formative period of early French history from the first century BC to the reign of Charlemagne, 768-814 AD.

HIS 326 (3) History of Modern Germany—A study of Germany from Frederick the Great to the present, with particular attention to the German state’s political impact upon world history since 1870.

HIS 327 (3) Renaissance and Reformation—An examination of the age of the Renaissance and its impact upon world thought, with special emphasis on the Reformation as a response to this view. Pre-requisites: HIS 101, or consent of the professor.

HIS 350 (3) Survey of Non-Western Cultures—A review of three major non-Western cultures: Islam and the Middle East, China, and Japan. 

HIS 352 (3) History of Latin America—A study of the social, cultural and political institutions of Latin America from colonial days to the present.  Particular attention will be given to the formation of Latin society during the colonial period, the impact of the revolutionary era and the attempts of the Latin American nations to achieve social, political and economic stability and progress in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

HIS 375 (3) The Study of History—A survey of history as academic discipline and as profession.  The course will include philosophies of history, the contemporary academic and professional scene and detailed guidance in preparation of research papers.

HIS 391 (1-3) Directed Study—Directed reading in a concentrated area and the writing of a major paper.  Contract.

HIS 393 (1-3) Seminar—Designated special-interest classes, seminars, or field experiences supervised by faculty, with appropriate course requirements. Credit may be given more than once.

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 

INS 100 (1) Class Guitar—Class lessons for the beginning student in folk guitar.

INS 201 (1-2) Private Lessons for Non-Majors—For all non-majors studying private wind, string or percussion instruments. Students registering for 1 credit hour receive a one-half-hour lesson weekly.  Students registering for 2 credit hours receive a one-hour lesson weekly.  Students are encouraged to also enroll in an approved ensemble.  Fee.

INS 211 (1-2) Private Lessons for Underclassmen Music Majors and all Music Minors—Underclassmen music majors and music minors enroll for 4 semesters of private instruction at the 211 level. Students registering for 1 credit hour receive a one-half-hour lesson weekly.  Students registering for 2 credit hours receive a one-hour lesson weekly.  Students selecting a performance emphasis are required to register for 2 credit hours per term Pre-requisite: Acceptance into the music major or music minor by audition as described in the Music Student Handbook.  Fee.

INS 411 (1-2) Advanced Private Lessons for Upperclassmen Music Majors—Upperclassmen music majors in the B.A. degree program must complete 4 semesters of instruction at the 411 level.  Those electing the Performance Emphasis are required to enroll for 2 credit hours per term.  Students whose emphasis is Composition or Music History are only required two semesters of private lessons at the 411 level—with a demonstration of major instrument proficiency as outlined in the recital guidelines published by the Music Department (available at this website: www.asbury.edu/academics/departments/music/music-home/current-student-forms). Upperclassmen music education majors in the B.S. degree program must complete at least 3 semesters of instruction at the 411 level.  Pre-requisite:  Upperclassman Proficiency Exam passed, as described in the Music Student Handbook.  Fee.

INS 461, 462 (1 each) Instrumental Pedagogy—Designed for performance emphasis students but not restricted to them. Open to students preparing to teach brass, woodwind, string, or percussion instruments. Emphasis is given to a survey of pedagogical procedures and materials. Practical experience is gained through supervised teaching (offered on occasion).

JOURNALISM

JRN 210 (3) Foundations of Journalism—While learning the foundational principles of journalism, students will tell stories for online and print news outlets on campus. The class will emphasize four basic types of journalistic writing: news, feature, review, and op-ed.

JRN 214 (3) Convergent News—Students will learn how to create and re–write news stories for audio/radio, online and television/video distribution. The course will help students focus on the writing, reporting and production techniques needed to operate in a multi-platform news world.  Fee.

JRN 275 (3) Reporters of the Roundtable(Opinion Jrn)Students write opinion/editorial pieces and host a weekly CNN Crossfire-style talk show featuring topics involving current events, media ethics, and politics. Fee.

JRN 285 (3) Travel Journalism—Students travel to other countries, meet international journalists, and contribute travel stories and video segments to an original website. (Optional Summer Course)

JRN 303 (3) Feature Stories and Reviews— Students write personality profiles, book/movie/arts reviews, and other feature stories.

JRN 307 (3) Editing, Publishing, & Design—While studying the rapidly changing publishing industry, students write articles, shoot photos, and design layouts for a magazine (in both print and digital versions) distributed to the student body. Students also develop grammar, style, spelling, punctuation, and ethical problem-solving skills needed to edit print and online publications. Fee. 

JRN 333 (3) Advanced Newsgathering / Investigative ReportingStudents learn advanced research and reporting techniques. Topics include public records, public meetings, investigative reporting, Sunshine laws, First Amendment issues, and Freedom of Information Act requests. Students complete an investigative project on a marginalized group within the community and present a “Voice for the Voiceless” project to the public.

JRN 343 (3) Photo and Video JournalismStudents learn how to shoot still photos, create audio slideshows, and create video segments for news outlets. Fee.

JRN 375 (3) Documentary FilmmakingStudents use research, reporting, interviewing, and other journalistic techniques to produce a long-form video project (a documentary) exploring a newsworthy topic. Fee. 

JRN 390 (3) Creative Non-Fiction—This course, integral to students’ understanding of journalism pursued as an art form, draws on the foundations of Nineteenth Century British Literature. Students will read and examine the writing and stylistic approaches of a variety of authors, producing their own writing in the context of the course.

JRN 391 (1-3) Independent Study—A directed and supervised investigation of a selected research problem or issue in the field of Journalism.  A student may not take more than four (4) hours of independent study. Contract.

JRN 393 (1-3) Seminar—A seminar focusing on one or more significant areas of journalism such as advocacy journalism, editing, pictorial journalism, journalism history, propaganda/persuasion in the media, devotional writing, review writing for books, plays, films, and records. Topics chosen by instructor. For students having completed two three‑hour journalism courses. Credit may be given more than once.

JRN 435 (1-3) Internship—Students work in an independent study capacity under supervision of a faculty member and an on-site editor or media manager.  Requires regular meetings with a faculty member, journal and time log, portfolio of finished, independently-produced journalistic work, and a final analytical paper tying the experience to industry-related issues. Pre-requisites: JRN 210 and junior status or by approval of the department head based on significant prior media experience. Contract.

JRN 475 (1) Senior Seminar—Designed to prepare the journalism student for entrance into the professional world.  Topics include pursuing advanced degrees, developing a resume and portfolio, and developing a strategy for future employment in journalism-related fields.

(Kinesiology) PE – ROTC 

KHP 107 (1) BEGINNING CONDITIONING—Instruction in a variety of motor skills activities.  Courses are designed for students at a beginning level.  Up to six hours credit may be earned in service course. This course may count towards satisfying the PE foundational requirement. 

LIBERAL ARTS 

LA 100 (1) ENGAGING THE LIBERAL ARTS—An interactive seminar designed to promote critical and conceptual thinking about questions arising about human life, culture, experience, and Christian faith. Required of all new first-time full-time students and freshmen transfers.  Fee.

LATIN 

LAT 101 (3) Elementary Latin I—An introduction to classical Latin with an emphasis on grammatical foundations. This course is designed for students who have never studied Latin.

LAT 102 (3) Elementary Latin II—Grammatical review and expansion of Elementary Latin I. Pre-requisite: LAT 101 or by advanced placement.

LAT 201 (3) Intermediate Latin I—Development of translation skills in Latin literature (from the Golden Age to the Renaissance) with emphasis on increasing familiarity with Latin prose, poetry, and history. Pre-requisite: LAT 102 or by advanced placement.

LAT 202 (3) Intermediate Latin II—A continuation of LAT 201. Pre-requisite: LAT 201 or by advanced placement. 

LAT 301 (3) Readings in Latin Literature I—Readings in Latin literature from the classical period, including such authors as Virgil and Ovid.  Pre-requisite: LAT 202 or permission of the professor.

LAT 302 (3) Readings in Latin Literature II—A comprehensive reading of classical Latin literature in such authors as Cicero and Caesar.  Pre-requisite: LAT 301 or permission of the professor.

LAT 391 (1-3) Independent Study—Independent study in a specialized field in consultation with supervising professor.  Requirements usually include assigned readings combined with a research paper.  Pre-requisite: Completion of LAT 202 and a 3.0 GPA in Latin courses or by permission of professor.  Contract.

LAT 393 (1-3) Seminar—A course designed for advanced students with the area of concentration to be determined by the staff. Credit for this course may be given more than once.

LAT 401 (3) Readings in Latin Literature III—Advanced grammar, syntax, and readings in such classical authors as Horace and Seneca. Pre-requisite: LAT 302 or permission of the professor.

LAT 402 (3) Readings in Latin Literature IV—Advanced grammar, syntax, and readings in such classical authors as Livy and Tacitus. Pre-requisite: LAT 401 or permission of the professor.

LEADERSHIP & MINISTRY 

LMN 310 (3) Strategies for Success—[formerly MGT 310] The setting of goals, as well as priorities among those goals, with an emphasis on how those goals and priorities relate to the realities and aspirations of life.  The attitude of the individual, including other aspects of psychological makeup and how it affects the ability and willingness to set goals and priorities.  An emphasis on how goals, priorities and attitudes can lead to effective Christian personal management.

LMN 322 (3) History of Israel—A survey of Israel’s history as presented in the Pentateuch and the historical books with emphasis on creation, fall, covenant, kingship, and Israel’s role in God’s redemptive work.

LMN 332 (3) Leadership in Ministry—A survey of foundational principles of spiritual and organizational leadership in ministry settings.  Particular focus is placed on team leadership and development of leaders.

LMN 342 (3) Jesus and the Gospels—A study of the life of Jesus in its ancient socio-historical and canonical contexts, and of the Four Gospels with regard to their literary genres and forms, settings, theology, and contemporary relevance.

LMN 352 (3) Studying and Teaching the Bible—An introduction to processes for studying and understanding the Bible with a view toward life application.  Students develop skills in these processes, as well as in preparing and leading group Bible studies.

LMN 362 (3) Old Testament Prophetic Literature—A study of selected passages from key prophetic books focusing upon the prophets’ message of justice, mercy, salvation and future hope.

LMN 372 (3) Dynamics of Spiritual Growth—A study of the dynamics of Christian growth and maturity, with special emphasis on the Spirit-filled life.  Concepts of discipleship and spiritual formation will be considered in the light of human developmental patterns.  The course is concerned with students’ own spiritual growth, and their facilitation of others’ spiritual growth.

LMN 378 (3) Growth of the New Testament Church—A study of the emergence and development of the first century Christian church in relationship to its historical, religious and philosophical milieu, with particular attention given to the Book of Acts.

LMN 382 (3) New Testament Letters—A study of select epistolary literature of the New Testament—especially Paul’s major letters, Hebrews, and 1 John—focusing on principles of interpretation, theological content, ethics, and spiritual formation.

LMN 392 (3) Congregational Education—Principles and practices for the church’s ministry of education and disciple-making will be considered, with concern for integration of Biblical/theological perspectives with the findings of educational and developmental research.

LMN 397 (3) Christianity and World Religions—A critical analysis of the beliefs and practices of contemporary religious systems, including Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, animism, and secular humanism.  Special attention is given to developing strategies for intersecting people groups who practice such religious systems with the message of the Gospel.

LMN 410 (3) Mentoring in Ministry—(MM program) An examination of the practice of mentoring as a tool for assisting people in life development and Christian discipleship.  The course will explore the diversity and pervasiveness of mentoring as a construct and as a practice.  Students will learn to do literature review, and are expected to be in a mentoring relationship while in the course.

LMN 412 (3) History of the Early Church—A study of the development of the post-apostolic Christian church through the Council of Chalcedon (451 A.D.).

LMN 422 (3) Small Groups—An exploration of the value and function of small groups for discipleship and leadership development.  Principles and practices of leading such groups will be studied, and students will become acquainted with historical and contemporary models of small group ministry.

LMN 432 (3) Psalms and Wisdom—An introduction to the Psalms and Wisdom Literature of the Old Testament emphasizing the theological themes of praise and worship, lament and doubt, and the ethical dimensions of biblical faith.

LMN 433 (3) Flourishing in Ministry—(MM program) An analysis of factors that contribute to longevity and satisfaction in the role of minister.  Wellness begins in a journey of personal self-awareness, as well as gaining an understanding of self-care and lifestyles that promote balance throughout the lifecycle. The holistic focus of the course includes consideration of marital, interpersonal, physical, and spiritual dimensions.  Sources of stress, burnout, impairment, and means for coping will be a particular concern of the course.

LMN 434 (3) Organizational Strategies in Ministry—A study of organizational strategies and administrative structures for effective ministry.  Attention is given to planning, implementing and evaluating the organizational and administrative framework of various types of ministries.

LMN 442 (3) Theology of Mission—A study of theological foundations for mission, including examination of both Old and New Testament texts.  Attention will be given to Israel’s responsibility for other nations, the commissions given by Jesus, and the missiological practices of Paul and other early church leaders, with an eye toward principles for reaching today’s world.

LMN 453 (3) Ministry Risks and Crises—(MM program) An exploration of a range of crisis possibilities and risk management issues that confront ministry leaders in the North American context.  Students will develop policies and procedures related to facility lock-downs, safety and liability, screening of volunteers, personal/professional boundaries, and coordination/accountability with community public safety and regulatory agencies.  Crisis counseling models for effective pastoral care through normative life transitions and trauma will be included. Case study will be a primary method in this course.

LMN 462 (3) The Church in Contemporary Society—The role of the Church within society will be explored in the light of Biblical teaching about the Kingdom of God, with concern for various models and expressions of church in the contemporary setting.

LMN 472 (3) Christian Theology—An exploration of the Christian faith from the perspective of biblical, historical, and systematic theology.

LMN 475 (3)  Contemporary Issues in the Ministry Context — (MM program)  A study applying Christian faith and ministry practice to the contemporary cultural context, recognizing such context includes values and policies that may be at variance with orthodox faith positions.  Students learn and practice a process of theological reflection, based on a Wesleyan-Holiness perspective, as a framework for developing Christian faith-centered engagement with present and emergent issues and challenges.

MATHEMATICS 

[MAT courses registered as MTA have a fee attached.] 

MAT 100 (3) Introduction to Problem Solving—Basic arithmetic and algebra skills set in the context of practical problem solving.  Includes basic mathematical modeling and computing tools for setting up and solving problems in a variety of applications.  Required of all freshmen with ACT/SAT Math scores of 21/500 or below.

MAT 111 (3) College Algebra—Review of fundamental concepts of algebra including radicals, exponents, products and factoring. A study of equations and inequalities, and functions and graphs including polynomial and rational functions. Pre-requisite: MAT 100 or ACT/SAT Math score of 22/510.

MAT 112 (3) Precalculus—Emphasizes a strong working knowledge of logarithmic and trigonometric functions. A major review of algebra with emphases on functions. Includes a preview of calculus. Pre-requisite: MAT 100 or ACT/SAT Math score of 22/510.

MAT 120 (3) Concepts of Mathematics and Technology—Mathematics of Probability, Statistics and Finance with labs for spreadsheet design as a tool in the investigations.   Pre-requisite: MAT 100 or ACT/SAT Math score of 22/510 or higher.

MAT 131 (3) Finite Mathematics for Business—Mathematics of finance, systems of equations, matrices, linear programming, and probability with applications to business and economics. Pre-requisite: MAT 100 or ACT/SAT Math score of 22/510.

MAT 132 (3) Calculus for Business—Differential and integral calculus with applications to business and economics. 

MAT 181, 182 (4 each) Calculus I, II—An innovative course designed to teach the standard topics of calculus within the framework of applications. The emphasis is on seeing how calculus can be used in a large variety of settings, Derivatives and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions in one and several variables are covered, as are introductory vector methods and infinite series. 

MAT/MTA 201 (3) Elementary School Mathematics I— This course is designed to equip future early primary teachers to facilitate children’s mathematical development. Using the Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice and Mathematical Content, students in this class will focus on deepening their own knowledge of mathematics and their understanding of the ways in which children learn mathematics. The clinical component of the course will pair these future teachers with children, focusing on their strategies, supporting their exploration of big ideas, and coaching them as they develop models for understanding. In this course, future teachers should develop a profound knowledge of the Pre-K to Grade 2 material. Selected material from other grades is explored in preparation for future courses in the series. Additionally a review of all of the mathematics skills and knowledge pieces from Grades 3-5 is included. Pre-requisite: MAT 100 or ACT/SAT Math score of 22/510.  

MAT/MTA 202 (3) Elementary School Mathematics II—This course is designed to equip future elementary teachers to facilitate children’s mathematical development. Using the Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice and Mathematical Content, students in this class will focus on deepening their own knowledge of mathematics and their understanding of the ways in which children learn mathematics. The clinical component of the course will pair these future teachers with children, focusing on their strategies, supporting their exploration of big ideas, and coaching them as they develop models for understanding. In this course, future teachers should develop a profound knowledge of the Grade 3 and Grade 4 material. Selected material from other grades is explored and a review of all of the mathematics skills and knowledge pieces from Grades 3-7 is included.  Pre-requisite: MAT 201. 

MAT/MTA 203 (3) Elementary School Mathematics III—This course is designed to equip future elementary and middle school teachers to facilitate children’s mathematical development. Using the Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice and Mathematical Content, students in this class will focus on deepening their own knowledge of mathematics and their understanding of the ways in which children learn mathematics. The clinical component of the course will pair these future teachers with children, focusing on their strategies, supporting their exploration of big ideas, and coaching them as they develop models for understanding. In this course, future teachers should develop a profound knowledge of the Grade 5 and Grade 6 material. Selected material from other grades is explored and a review of all of the mathematics skills and knowledge pieces from Grades 3-8 is included. Pre-requisite: MAT 202. 

MAT 232 ( 4) Probability and Statistics—An introduction to probability and statistics including the organization, representation, descriptive analysis, and interpretation of data; the design of surveys, experiments and observational studies; continuous and discrete probability; conditional probability; combinatorial techniques; hypothesis testing; regression and correlation; and generation of confidence intervals.

MAT 241 (3) Logic and Sets—A study of the language of logic and of the theory of sets with their applications to various content areas of mathematics for the purpose of helping the student acquire an ability to construct mathematical proofs.  Pre-requisite: MAT 181.

MAT 252 (3) Differential Equations and Modeling—A first course in the quantitative solution of differential equations, including first-order equations, and second- and higher-order linear equations. There will be an emphasis throughout the course on the application of differential equations to various real-world problems. Pre-requisite: MAT 182.

MAT 271 (3) Linear Algebra—A study of linear algebra, including vector spaces, matrices, determinants, inner products, linear transformations, and eigenvalues and eigenvectors.  Pre-requisite: MAT 182.

MAT 281 (3) Probability—Calculus-based introduction to probability including distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, expected values, and the Central Limit Theorem.  Pre-requisite:  MAT 182.

MAT 351, 352 (3 each) Applied Mathematics I, II—A contemporary approach to applied mathematics with focus on computational techniques.  Numerous scientific and engineering applications are covered along with the associated algorithms, always stressing a consistent underlying mathematical framework.  Topics include introductions to numerical linear algebra, initial value problem solution, boundary value problem solution, interpolation, approximation and generalized Fourier series.   Pre-requisite: CSC 121, MAT 252, 271.

MAT 362 (4) Modern Geometry—A study of geometry including transformations, congruence, similarity, trigonometry, coordinate geometry, 2- and 3- dimensional shapes, traditional and alternate systems of constructions, proofs, work with dynamic geometry software, exploration of non-Euclidean geometries, and measurement. This course is designed for teacher candidates in the Mathematics Grades 8-12 Major or the Middle School Math Emphasis. Pre-requisite: MAT 241. (Every third year)

MAT 371 (4) Algebraic Structures—Introduces algebraic structures including groups, subgroups, rings, fields and integral domains.  Special emphasis is placed on the real number system.  The course includes a brief introduction to number theory and a review of matrix algebra. Also, a systematic review of Algebra I, Algebra II, Precalculus, and Mathematical Modeling are conducted in a manner appropriate to Middle School and High School Teachers.  (Every third year)

MAT 391 (1-3) Directed Study—An advanced study of select problems.  Pre-requisite: 9 hours of MAT in courses numbered 300 or above and a 3.00 GPA in MAT courses. Not more than four hours may apply toward graduation.  Contract.

MAT 393 (1) Seminar—Discussion of selected topics.  May be offered in conjunction with other departments or as a separate course primarily for math or computer science students.

MAT 432 (3) Financial Statistics—Application of statistical methods in finance and economics.  Topics include single and multivariate regression analysis, integrated methods, moving average models, auto-regression models, time series analysis, ARMA and ANOVA models.  Pre-requisite:  MAT 232.  (Alternate years.)

MAT 435 (1-3) Financial Mathematics Internship—In consultation with program faculty, a student will be placed in an internship in the business, finance or insurance industry.  The student will maintain contact with the faculty sponsor and produce a paper or presentation of the work done during the internship experience.  Contract.

MAT 442 (3) Numerical Analysis—-A study of numerical methods concerned with the formulation of mathematical problems so that they may be solved using computers. Topics include root finding, interpolation, integration, and the solution of linear systems and differential equations. Pre-requisites: MAT 252, 271 and CSC 122. (alternate years)

MAT 460 (3)Topics in Mathematics for Elementary Teachers—This course begins with assessments and surveys and from the information obtained proceeds to the creation and implementation of development plans  to ensure that the elementary education major is highly qualified mathematically to teach K-6 mathematics and to serve other professionals as a math expert within the school system.  The course includes demonstrated mastery of the mathematics underlying the Common Core State Standards.       

MAT 461 (3)Topics in Mathematics for Middle School Teachers—This course begins with assessments and surveys and from the information obtained proceeds to the creation and implementation of development plans to ensure that the Middle School Education major with a math emphasis is highly qualified mathematically to teach Grades 5-9 mathematics.  This includes demonstrated mastery of the mathematics underlying the Common Core State Standards for all of the courses taught in Middle School and a demonstrated mastery of the mathematics underlying those courses for which High school credit is sometimes given to advanced Middle School students. 

MAT 462 (3)Topics in Mathematics for High School Teachers – This course begins with assessments and surveys and from the information obtained proceeds to the creation and implementation of development plans to ensure that the Grades 8-12 Mathematics major is highly qualified mathematically to teach Grades 8-12 mathematics.  This includes demonstrated mastery of the mathematics underlying the Common Core State Standards for all of the courses taught in High School and a demonstrated mastery of the mathematics underlying those courses for which AP credit is available in mathematics.

MAT 471 (3) Abstract Algebra—An introduction to mathematical theory on rings, groups and their homomorphism and isomorphism.  Pre-requisite: MAT 241 and 271.  Offered alternate years.

MAT 474 (1) Financial Mathematics Senior Capstone—Focuses on how to use financial mathematics skills to penetrate and impact the cultural setting of corporate leaders in the U.S.and overseas.  Requires a paper which synthesizes the student’s vision of how financial mathematics may be used for the Kingdom of God.  Paper will be reviewed by a panel of people from both inside and outside the University who will then administer an oral examination to the student.  Requires at least one professional interview with a senior executive, academician, or politician.

MAT 475 (1) Senior Seminar—This course will consist of a series of projects, many of which are chosen by students, on the basis of evaluative procedures and career plans. Most projects will involve class presentations, and projects that integrate several topics will be particularly encouraged.

MAT 481 (3) Real Analysis—A detailed examination of the analytic foundations of calculus. Topics include sequences, limits, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration, and an introduction to topology. Pre-requisite:  MAT 241. (alternate years)

MAT 482 (3) Complex Analysis—The first course in the extension of calculus to complex numbers. Topics include the concept of analytic functions, the Cauchy‑Riemann equations, Cauchy's theorem and formula, power series, the calculus of residues and the evaluation of definite integrals, conformal maps, and Riemann surfaces. Pre-requisite: MAT 252, 271. (alternate years)

MEDIA COMMUNICATION 

MC 101 (3) Media and Society—Development, functions, processes, control, and effects of mass media. A survey of the media industry, its socio‑economic role in American society, and the impact of mass media in society, as well as society's influence on the media.  Fee.

MC 120 (3) Radio Production—Students will gain a basic understanding of audio equipment used for radio production and live broadcasting. Course provides experience and knowledge of the principles and techniques of producing radio commercials, news, documentaries, interviews and magazines.  Participation in live broadcasting on WACW campus radio.  Fee.

MC 121 (3) Audio Production Basics—A broad overview of audio production including audio theory, basic digital audio techniques, basic audio recording and mixing techniques, and familiarity with relevant software and hardware.  Required for Audio Production emphasis. (offered every semester) Fee.

MC 211 (3) Fundamentals of Media Performance—A study of the theories and techniques of performance in film, audio, video, and public address. Students will be given opportunities for performance in studio and other public communication settings. The course will acquaint students with the media performance industry, with emphasis on personal marketing and tools for employment. Fee.

MC 212 (3) Writing for The Media—Examines a variety of techniques and formats including broadcast news, web/interactive media, television commercials/public service announcements, industrial/non-profit video, documentaries, and screenplays.  Practical emphasis on improving writing/editing skills and developing writing strategies.  Pre-requisite: ENG 110 or 151.  Fee.

MC 220 (1) Inside the Entertainment Industry—This course will introduce students to some of the distinctive elements of film, music, television and media management.  Students will learn how producers and managers work to combine audience research, business principles and industry analysis to do their jobs. Fee. 

MC 222 (3) Digital Audio EditingA comprehensive study of digital audio workstation (DAW) editing techniques used in various audio production environments. Detailed instruction in the use of Pro Tools and other software with emphasis on stereo and multi-track editing, noise reduction, tuning, use of plug-ins, and delivery formats. Lab exercises are used to develop hands-on competency; hands-on proficiencies assess abilities. (offered each spring). Pre-requisite: MC 121 Fee.

MC 225 (3) Interactive Media I—Provides an overview of new multimedia technologies and their impact on human communication as well as cultural, ethical, and industry implications.  Emphasizes basic design principles for effective digital information architecture and offers a hands-on introduction to building web sites and creating multimedia presentations.  Includes a lab.  Fee.

MC 228 (3) Live Audio & Sound Reinforcement—Explores microphone selection, acoustics, live mixing, equalizing, sound reinforcement and live recording.  Includes a lab.  Fee.

MC 261 (4) Multi-Camera Television Production—Survey of the theory, process, and technique of television production including the planning, preparation, and production of various types of studio and remote programs.  Includes three-hour lecture and a lab.  Fee.

MC 272 (3) Principles of Cinematic Storytelling—This course will introduce students to the basics of film aesthetics.  This will include the study of essential film theories, film criticism and history, film classics, editing and screenwriting theories, and the key elements of visual storytelling.  Fee.

MC 282 (4) Screenwriting Fundamentals—[Formerly THA 282]  A writing course in film and television.  Original screenplays will be developed.  Includes lab for script development and discussion of three act structure and story development based on Aristotle's Poetics and Lajos Egri.  Includes a lab.  May be repeated twice for credit. Fee.

MC 302 (3) Digital Field & Post-Production—Techniques in television field production.  Special emphasis on single-camera, film-style shooting, field lighting and audio, producing, budgeting, working with clients, and post-production editing.  Pre-requisite: MC 261.  Fee.

MC 308 (3) Broadcast News—A study of the broadcast news process primarily emphasizing television news.  Content includes writing, reporting, news editing and news production.  Pre-requisite: JRN 214, or MC 212 and 302, or permission of the instructor.  Fee.

MC 310 (3) Cinematography & Lighting—This course will introduce students to the fundamental theory and practice of cinematography and lighting for film and video.  We will examine the technical and the aesthetic aspects of cinematography and learn how to apply this knowledge to practical cinematographic choices.  Pre-requisite: MC 302.  Fee.

MC 316 (3) Creativity & Entrepreneurship—This course will help students to develop entrepreneurial skills to further creative expression.  It focuses on formulating strategies, turning challenges into opportunities, building analytical tools and developing an integrative point of view. Online.  Fee.

MC 317 (3) Film Criticism & Aesthetics—This course will introduce students to the basics of film criticism and analysis by studying the various ways that filmmakers use cinematic techniques to create and communicate meaning to the viewer. This will include analysis of the essential film theories, film history, the film classics, and editing and screenwriting theories. Online. Fee.

MC 320 (3) Inside the Music BusinessOverview of all aspects of the music industry including: copyright law, recording contracts, music publishing, artist management, touring, marketing and promotion. (spring odd years) Fee.

MC 321 (3) American Cinema—American Cinema Will examine the Development and history of the film industry in the United States.  The course will focus its study on the work of Hollywood’s most influential directors, in an attempt to develop an understanding of the American aesthetic and storytelling identity.  We will also study the influence of independent filmmakers in the United States.  Fee.

MC 322 (3) International Cinema—International Cinema will examine the development and history of national cinema in Japan, Russia, Italy, France, Mexico, and elsewhere.  The course will focus its study on the work of each country’s most influential directors, in an attempt to develop an understanding of each nation’s aesthetic and storytelling identity.  Fee.

MC 324 (3) Sound Design for Sports—An in-depth review of capturing the sound of sports competition. This class will study current audio techniques in stereo and surround sound for television as well as discuss the emerging audio technologies. Students will explore how the story is enhanced by quality audio. (Online only)  Pre-requisite: MC 121. Fee.

MC 325 (3) Design for Film, Television, & Theatre—Students will explore how design influences storytelling by studying design concepts for film, television and theatre. They will learn how to analyze a script and create a design plan including costuming, sets, and props. (Online only)  Pre-requisite: MC 302. Fee.

MC 326 (3) Sports Storytelling —Sports Storytelling will study the relationships between the director and producer and the storytelling creative process in television sports. Content will focus on features as well as multi-camera production. (Online only)  Pre-requisite: MC 302. Fee.

MC 328 (3) Designing & Creating with AfterEffects—This course is a hands-on course that covers the creation of projects with Adobe AfterEffects. Students will begin with the basics such as creating compositions and importing files. The class will then move on to animations, masks, text and some basic 3D. Fee.

MC 329 (3) Introduction to Coding & Development for Multimedia—This course will be an overview and exploration of coding in HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, CMS and mobile applications.  Fee.

MC 331 (3) Advanced Audio Production—Explores advanced audio production techniques including microphone positioning, multi-track recording and digital audio.  Course covers theory and practical hands-on applications in audio, radio and/or television.  May be repeated with a different course emphasis.  Pre-requisite: MC 121.  Fee.

MC 338 (3) Producing the Film—This course will explore the essential principles of producing for film and film for television. It will examine key concepts in financing, film monetization, distribution, crew hiring, budgeting, working with guilds, form creation, entertainment management, and various aspects of hands-on producing. Fee.

MC 340 (3) Editing Practice & Theory—This course will explore the practicalities and theories of film and video editing. It will provide advanced software editing techniques and the complicated procedures of post-production with an emphasis on importing footage and exporting to various formats.  The course will also explore key aesthetic approaches to editing narrative film.  Pre-requisite: MC 302.  Fee.

MC 341 (3) Directing the Narrative Film—This course will serve as an introduction to directing for film.  We will cover all the things it takes to direct short or feature-length film such as developing a visual language, understanding subtext, learning to direct actors, and executing the theme of your film through directing choices.  Each student will be responsible for directing one project that will be submitted to the Highbridge Film Festival.  In addition, we will be doing in-class workshops that cover actor coaching, creating shot lists and storyboards, and re-writing.  Pre-requisite: MC 302.  Fee.

MC 342 (3) Mass Communication Theory—A study of mass communication theory with emphasis on electronic media.  Fee.

MC 352 (3) Multitrack Recording TechniquesA detailed study focused on the recording process, including microphone technique, signal processing, session planning, organization, and communication. (Spring, even years)  Pre-requisite: MC 331. Fee.

MC 370 (3) Animation Design—A hands-on study of 3D computer animation.  Basic concepts and techniques of model building, mapping, lighting, and animation.  Pre-requisite: ART 354 & 452.  Fee.

MC 371 (3) Faith, Media & CallingOverview of the many intersections between media and the gospel, including media uses in the local church and in missions, religious broadcasting history, portrayals of Christ and Christians in film/television, and ways Christians can influence media organizations as “salt and light”.  Fee.

MC 372 (3) Interactive Media II—An advanced study of design, organization and creation of interactive multimedia with a studio team approach.  Covers the process of developing media elements, and dynamic content assets, and authoring a stand-alone application for digital distribution building an advanced web site and a portfolio site.  Pre-requisite: ART 354, MC 225. Includes a lab.  Fee.

MC 380 (3) Remote Television Production—The study and application of multi-camera remote field television production techniques. Field production areas that will be highlighted include directing, producing, camera and audio. Students will apply classroom-learned theory and techniques to a variety of remote productions. Pre-requisite: MC 261.  Fee.  On occasion.

MC 382 (3) Film Production—Students work collaboratively to shoot, direct and edit a narrative short or feature digital film production.  This is an intense, hands-on course that requires each student to fulfill one of the key roles in the film production process.  Acceptance into this class is by application.  Students must specifically apply for one of the fifteen crew positions.  Fee.

MC 391/491 (1-4) Directed Study—An opportunity for research, special projects and readings in the field of media communication. Juniors may take 391, seniors 491; course credit for the major may be received only once.  Fee. Contract.

MC 393 (1-3) Seminar—The study of various issues in the field of communication, with special emphasis on trends and issues of contemporary communication. Topics will be announced for each semester the course is offered. Credit for this course may be given more than once.  Fee.

MC 395 (3) Sitcom ProductionAdvanced studio class that provides students with practical experience in the techniques employed in the development and production of a multi-camera situation comedy through the production, filming and editing of an original multi-camera sitcom, to be filmed live in front of a studio audience.  This junior-senior level class requires being assigned a specific area of responsibility by the professor.  Due to the nature of the production, students will be required to put in mandatory hours outside of regularly-scheduled class times. Pre-requisite:  MC 261 or consent of the professor.  Fee.

MC 397 (3) Media Industry Travel SeminarFeatures visits to film, TV, Internet and radio companies/studios, as well as interviews with media personnel, in a large city. Trips may be inside or outside the United States.  The seminar gives students a better understanding of the media industry and the great variety of jobs within it.  Fee.

MC 401 (3) Advanced Directing—This upper-level directing course is intended for graduating seniors who plan to enter into the film industry upon graduation.  Students will be challenged to hone their aesthetic and storytelling skills through the creation of a project which they will use to immediately further their career.  In addition, the course will examine advanced camera, storytelling, and actor coaching techniques.  Pre-requisites: MC 302 and 341.  Fee.

MC 428 (3) Special Events Promotions and Production—Advanced studio class that provides students with opportunities to develop ideas, public relations, marketing plans, event management/production, storytelling, graphic design and print production for an actual event.  Students generally focus on one area for professional development for a portfolio-quality project.  Juniors and seniors only and requires being assigned to a specific area by the professor.  Pre-requisites include at least two media communication production courses, two journalism courses or a least two of the courses required for PR.  Credit for this course may be given more than once.  Fee.

MC 432 (3) Entrepreneurship in the Music BusinessExplores business models and marketing techniques used by musicians, audio engineers, record producers, recording studios, and independent record labels. Fee.

MC 435 (1-6) Internship—Broadcast or related industry experience under auspices of cooperating organization, with paper submitted detailing internship experiences.  Fee.  Contract.

MC 436 (3-6) Nashville InternshipStudents work in an independent study capacity under supervision of a faculty member and a mentor in the music industry in Nashville. Requires a journal, time log, and a final analytical paper tying the experience to industry-related issues. Pre-requisite: Junior or senior status or by approval of the department chair. Fee.

MC 437 (3-6) Los Angeles Internship—A supervised work experience with a previously approved film-related organization.  A minimum work experience of 60 hours per credit hour earned, a journal, and a final paper is required.  Pre-requisites: junior/senior standing, 12 hours completed within the major, and departmental approval. Students must be a Media, Communication, or Journalism major or minor. Contract.  Fee. Special off-campus fees apply.

MC 442 (3) Sound for Picture An in-depth study of the techniques used in creating and editing sound when related to motion picture. Topics include sound recording and editing, ADR, Foley, sound mixing, workflows and delivery methods. Pre-requisite: MC121. Fee.

MC 472 (3) Media Law—Develops understanding of the legal system in the United States and the legal issues and litigation most often confronting media institutions: first amendment, libel, privacy, obscenity, access, and shield law.  Fee. Alternate years.

MC 475 (.5) Senior Seminar I—Designed to prepare the media communication student for entrance into the professional world.  Topics include pursuing advanced degrees, developing a resume and portfolio, and developing a strategy for future employment in communication related fields.  Fee.

MC 476 (.5) Senior Seminar II—Continuation of MC 475 with increased emphasis on a completed portfolio for performance, production, film, multi-media or management. The course is also used for assessment testing in the student's senior year.  Fee.

MUSIC EDUCATION 

MED 241 (2) Brass Methods—Class instruction in the techniques of playing and teaching brass instruments.  Various materials and diagnostic measures are studied.

MED 242 (2) Strings Methods—Class instruction in the techniques of playing and teaching string instruments.  Various materials and diagnostic measures are studied.

MED 243 (2) Percussion Methods—Class instruction in the techniques of playing and teaching percussion instruments. Various materials and diagnostic measures are studied.

MED 244 (2) Woodwind Methods—Class instruction in the techniques of playing and teaching woodwind instruments.  Various materials and diagnostic measures are studied.

MED 302 (3) Introduction to Elementary Music Teaching— Introduction to music education pedagogy with overview of general methods and materials for teaching music in the elementary grades, including Orff methodology.  Includes lab teaching experiences with home-schooled students.

MED 303 (3) Training Children’s Voices, P-5—Introduction to training children’s voices and to incorporating Kodaly methodologies in both church and school vocal music programs.  Includes practical experience with home-schooled students.

MED 304 (2) Choral Music Pedagogy—Introduction to working with church and school choral programs for adolescent through adult singers.

MED 305 (1) Secondary General Music—Introduction to teaching secondary general music classes, including keyboard labs, guitar classes, humanities classes, world music, etc. (aligns with National Standards for Music Education and with Kentucky Core Content guidelines)

MED 363 (2) High School Instrumental Methods—Prepares the future instrumental music educator to teach band and/or orchestra in the secondary schools.  Students will develop skills in appropriate teaching techniques and strategies, create a file of appropriate materials, and develop a personal philosophy of music education.  Students will also acquire the skills needed to administer a successful instrumental music program.  Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor.

MED 364 (2) Marching Band Methods—Designed to prepare the instrumental music education major to organize and administer a marching band program in the secondary schools.  The student will learn computer assisted charting techniques for marching drill design, participate in a planned field experience, and develop teaching skills through peer teaching.  Students will explore the role of the marching band in the schools through a study of its history and the various philosophical positions related to the marching band.

MED 365 (2) Elementary/Middle School Instrumental Methods—Student will develop techniques, strategies, and materials unique to the elementary and middle school instrumental music program.  This course will introduce a systematic recruitment and retention program for the beginning instrumental music program, will develop skills in diagnosing and prescribing solutions for performance problems on the various band and orchestra instruments, and will examine the administrative skills needed for the program.  Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor.

MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE

MHL 251 (3) History and Literature of Music I—Early Christian, Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Periods (ca. 33-1750). A study of the music of these periods through reading, listening, performance practice seminar, and score analysis. Pre-requisite:  MTH 111 and 112 or consent of instructor.

MHL 252 (3) History and Literature of Music II—A continuation of MHL 251; study of music from ca. 1750 to the present (Classical, Romantic, and Modern). Pre-requisite: MTH 111 and 112 or consent of the instructor.

MHL 351 (2) Chamber Music—An intensive survey of solo and chamber literature, with particular attention given to the solo song, solo sonata and the string quartet. Students are encouraged to research and study the solo/chamber literature for their particular instrument.

MHL 352 (2) Symphonic Literature—An intensive survey of the symphonic repertoire from the late-18th century until the present. Both orchestral and wind repertoires are studied.

MHL 353 (2) Choral Masterworks—Intensive survey of choral masterworks from the Renaissance to the present, with particular emphasis on the works of J. S. Bach, W. A. Mozart, and Johannes Brahms.

MHL 354 (2) Music since 1900—In-depth study of the music of the 20th  and early 21st centuries with particular emphasis on the music of the post-World War II era, 1945-to present.

MHL 355 (2) World Music Survey—Intensive survey of a number of musical soundscapes of non-Western origin, and the cultural contexts out of which they arise, with particular emphasis given to the discipline of ethnomusicology and its attendant approaches to the study of individual soundscapes.  May not also hold credit for MHL 281.

MHL 356 (2) Opera and Musical Theater—A concentrated study of representative operas and musicals from the late 18th century to the contemporary Broadway stage.

MHL 391 (3) Independent Study—An introduction to the discipline of historical musicology and the techniques related to historical research in music. During this independent study the student will complete a major research and data- gathering project that will provide the basis for the student's Senior Project, MHL 475. Pre-requisite: Completion of MHL 251, 252, and at least one of the MHL 351-356 sequence of genre courses.  Contract.

MHL 393 (1-3) Seminar—Study of various issues in the field of music history and literature.  (on occasion) 

MHL 475 (2) Senior Seminar—Independent study during which the student will complete a major written report on a topic researched during MHL 391.  Results of the paper will be shared in the student’s Senior Lecture Recital, RCT 481.  Pre-requisite: MHL 391.

MINISTRY MANAGEMENT 

SALVATION ARMY PROGRAM ONLY

MIM 101(1) Ministry Management Program Orientation— The purpose of the course is to help facilitate the students’ learning of new technologies, systems, and strategies for success to enable them to successfully begin and complete the Ministry Management program.  The course is designed to help the student:  evaluate technology proficiency; gain an understanding of Asbury University’s online learning platform; demonstrate proper writing composition; learn strategies for effective personal and time management.  Students enrolled in the Ministry Management program must successfully complete this course by November of the first semester of study. Credit/No Credit.

MIM 290 (1) SA Summer Readings IStudents in the Ministry Management program will be assigned readings appropriate to the purpose and curriculum of the program, to be completed during the summer months. Credit/No Credit.

MIM 390 (1) SA Summer Readings IIStudents in the Ministry Management program will be assigned readings appropriate to the purpose and curriculum of the program, to be completed during the summer months. Credit/No Credit.

MIM 480 (3) Capstone Project OrientationAn introduction to the capstone project and research methodology, with a focus on assisting students to explore and identify an appropriate project within their ministry context. 

MIM 485 (3) Capstone Project Research IDevelop the capstone project to integrate experience and knowledge by focusing on a major research paper or project. 

MIM 490 (1) SA Summer Readings IIIStudents in the Ministry Management program will be assigned readings appropriate to the purpose and curriculum of the program, to be completed during the summer months. Credit/No Credit.

MIM 495 (3-6) Capstone Project Research IIDevelop the capstone project to integrate experience and knowledge by focusing on a major research paper or project. 

MIM 499 (3-6) Capstone ProjectThe capstone project provides opportunity for students to integrate experience and knowledge by focusing on a major research paper or project. Students conduct a literature review, identify an appropriate methodology, conduct the research, and report findings/conclusions through both seminar and written formats. 

MISSIONS  

MIS 201 (3) Christianity & Contemporary World Religions—A critical analysis of the belief systems and behavioral practices of contemporary religious systems such as Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, animism, secular humanism, etc. Special attention is given to the development of effective missionary strategies for reaching those people groups who practice such religious systems with the message of the Gospel. Every semester.

MIS 210 (3) Cross-Cultural Minister: Life and Work—Presents readings and research into the organizational and practical aspects of missions, including selection of candidates, funding, interpersonal relationships, and family versus-ministry tensions.  The course focuses on the work and ministry of the cross-cultural minister on the field.

MIS 311 (3) Strategies in Intercultural Communication—Focuses upon the development of skills needed for effective, cross-cultural communication of the Gospel. Attention is given to strategic concerns such as the understanding of one's target audience, the task of identification with that target audience, and the effects of cultural differences on the communication process. Fall.

MIS 312 (3) Mission Theology and Strategy—Considers the biblical, theological, and historical dimensions of mission. Includes study of strategies for world evangelism, transforming communities, and for church movements within specific cultural contexts.

MIS 322 (3) Christianity and Culture—Examines the impact of culture upon Christianity in all cultures, including our own, and the need for effective contextualization of the Gospel in every culture in order to establish an indigenous church. Attention is given to the implications of "being North American" in another culture as well as to the issue of "dynamic equivalency" in missionary strategy. Even-numbered years, Fall.

MIS 323 (3) Ministry in the 2/3 World—Focusing on the contemporary missiological emphasis of power evangelism, this course seeks to equip the cross-cultural worker to deal with the phenomenon of "signs and wonders" in a biblically responsible and culturally contextual manner. Attention is given to the need for an integration of the purity and power dimensions of ministry historically characteristic of the Wesleyan tradition. Even-numbered years, Spring.

MIS 330 (3) Latin American Culture and Religion—Provides the student with a general introduction to the intertwining of culture and religion in a present-day Roman Catholic Latin America as well as the historical, political and social conditions which gave rise to that culture. Attention is given to the phenomenon of religious change, to the Protestant sub-culture which is often formed as a result of such a change, and to modern socio-religious forces such as Liberation Theology, the role of multinational cooperation, the influence of United States government policy, etc. Alternate years. Travel course. Fee.

MIS 339 (3) Business as Mission(Same as BU/BUA 339) This course examines the role of business in missions. The general areas covered in this class are comprised of: 1) the philosophy of business as mission; 2) practical issues related to using business as a method for cross-cultural missions; and 3) an investigation of the spectrum of business models employed. By utilizing case studies, students in the course will have a better understanding of the opportunities and challenges associated with integrating business and missions.

MIS 340 (3) Urban Ministry—Addresses the church’s response to the social, economic, and political dynamics of urban centers.  Building on a biblical foundation, mission/ministry in the city is viewed from three perspectives:  historical, contemporary, and future.  The global explosion of urban growth will be examined and strategies will be explored to help the church move ahead in the midst of the tremendous challenges of poverty, racism, human exploitation, and corruption.

MIS 370 (3) Ethnography Field Study--A field-based learning experience in ethnography, with consideration of how these methods can help in various ministry settings.  Students spend four weeks in Wales studying the culture, interacting with informants, writing field notes, and generating reports—all under the tutelage of a faculty mentor. Fee. Offered occasionally.

MIS 435 (3) Internship—Integrates the practical experience of a short-term, cross-cultural assignment with directed, academic research. The course is carried out in connection with an approved agency such as a mission board, national church ministry, intercity outreach, etc. The student's performance is evaluated and graded by a faculty member of Asbury University in consultation with the approved agency. Contract.

MUSIC THEORY 

MTH 100 (2) Fundamentals of Music—Designed to increase proficiency in music fundamentals such as rhythm, scales, modes, intervals, triads. Suggested for non-majors or music majors or minors with Theory Placement Exam scores of less than 70%. A mastery of these basic fundamentals is essential for any further work in the music major or minor. Does not count toward graduation hours for a music major or minor (offered on occasion).

MTH 111 (2) Musicianship: Written Theory I—Basic theory sequence begins with a study of rhythm, scales, intervals, triads, and cadences, followed by principles of harmony, embellishing tones, and 18th-century part-writing techniques. Original compositions in a simple, four-voice texture are written. Pre-requisite: Theory Placement Exam.

MTH 112 (2) Musicianship: Written Theory II—This course is a continuation of Basic Musicianship I, and introduces melodic form, large-scale melodic relationships, and simple two and three-part forms. Further exploration of harmony centers on diatonic seventh chords and chords of secondary function, and includes elementary modulation. Original compositions in two or three-part forms are written. Pre-requisite: MTH 111.

MTH 121 (1.5) Musicianship: Sight Singing / Aural Training I—Sight singing / aural training sequence begins with a study of rhythm, scales, modes, intervals, triads and corrective listening as well as large-scale analytical listening. Emphasis is on experiential tasks and the skill of aural imaging; in addition to class meeting, students attend a weekly sight-singing lesson and complete a taped transcription assignment. Class meets twice weekly, and is taken concurrently with MTH 111. Pre-requisite: Theory Placement Exam.

MTH 122 (1.5) Musicianship: Sight Singing / Aural Training II—Sight singing / aural training sequence continues the study of rhythm, scales, modes, intervals, triads, and corrective listening as well as large-scale analytical listening. Aural training expands to include seventh chords. Emphasis is on experiential tasks and the skill of aural imaging; in addition to class meetings, students attend a weekly sight singing lesson and complete a taped transcription assignment. Class meets twice weekly, and is taken concurrently with MTH 112. Pre-requisite: MTH 121.

MTH 231 (4) Advanced Musicianship I—An integration of the aspects of written theory, sight singing, and aural training.  This course explores 18th-century contrapuntal forms, followed by Classical forms such as sonata-allegro and rondo.  Harmonic vocabulary expands to include altered pre-dominants, followed by early 19th-century harmonic developments.  Sight singing curriculum include melodies with modulations/altered tones, as well as rhythms with varying meters, syncopations, and unusual subdivisions.  Emphasis on developing a facility with bass lines and harmonic progressions, including chords of secondary function as well as altered pre-dominants.  Corrective listening, as well as large-scale analytical listening, further heightens aural abilities.  Pre-requisite: MTH 111, 112, 121, 122.

MTH 232 (4) Advanced Musicianship II—An integration of the aspects of written theory, sight singing, and aural training.  This course is a continuation of Advanced Musicianship I, and introduces linear chromaticism in 19th-century piano forms as well as late 19th-century harmonic developments, including higher-order tertian sonorities.  Examines 20th-century harmony, rhythm, and compositional techniques, and includes early 20th-century tonal music, set theory, serial  procedures, and recent musical developments.  Training in sight singing and aural training expands to include 20th-century concepts in rhythm, melody, and harmony.  Emphasis on developing a facility with bass lines and harmonic progressions, including chords of secondary function, as well as altered pre-dominants.  Corrective listening, as well as large-scale analytical listening further heightens aural abilities.  Pre-requisite:  MTH 231.

MTH 293 (2) Introduction to Composition and Arranging—An exploration of the basic principles of composition and arranging in preparation for MTH 393.  Pre-requisite: B+ average in MTH 111, 112, 231 and approval of the instructor.

MTH 311 (2) Form and Analysis—A study of basic formal principles of music by means of thorough analyses of representative pieces. Students develop analytical skills, both visual and aural, so that they might begin to interpret and perform music intelligently. Pre-requisite: MTH 232.

MTH 322 (2) Counterpoint—An advanced exploration of the contrapuntal forms and techniques of the 18th century by means of in-depth analysis of representative pieces; includes polyphonic composition in two, three, and four-part counterpoint (offered on occasion).

MTH 331 (1) Orchestration—A study of the characteristics of band and orchestral instruments, with assignments in scoring for various instrumental combinations, full band/orchestral score and smaller ensembles. Pre-requisite:  MTH 232. (Students in the composition/arranging emphasis must take MTH 332 in place of MTH 331).

MTH 332 (2) Advanced Orchestration—An advanced study of the characteristics of band and orchestral instruments, with assignments in scoring for various instrumental combinations, full band/orchestra score and smaller ensembles.  Pre-requisite: a B+ average in MTH 231 and 232.

MTH 393 (1-3) Composition Seminar—Students work in a private lesson setting in the area of original composition and arranging, leading to the development of a repertoire suitable for presentation at their Senior Recital (RCT 481).  Pre-requisite: MTH 293.  May be repeated to a maximum of 7 hours.

MUSIC THERAPY

MTP 200 (2) Introduction to Music TherapyThe purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic concepts and practices in the field of music therapy.

MTP 201 (1) Music Therapy PracticumThe purpose of this course is to provide students with opportunities to observe the use of music therapy in clinical settings.

MUSIC

MUS 100 (3)  Understanding Music—Designed for the liberal arts student as an introduction to the art of music, in which refined listening skills, knowledge of the basic parameters of music, and informed aesthetic judgment lead to perceptive understanding of a wide range of historical, cultural and contemporary musical styles.

MUS 110 (1) Music Reading For Singers—Basic sight-singing for non-majors (how to sound-out and sing the melodies and rhythms of various vocal parts without using an instrument).

MUS 150 (1) Music Technology I—An introduction to the use of software and technology commonly utilized by music majors and minors.  Students learn fundamental skills in use of music notation software as well as basic recording and sound reinforcement technology.  Required of all music majors and minors (unless proficiency is demonstrated in covered technologies), but open to all students. Credit/No Credit. Pre-requisite: Basic music notation reading skills.

MUS 200 (3) Piano Technology—Open to all students, preference is given to music majors and minors. This course not only teaches piano tuning, servicing, and repair but also the history and the development of the piano, the making of a Steinway grand piano and the servicing of electric pianos and harpsichords. Some attention is given to the theory and acoustics of stringed instruments. Fee.  (on occasion)

MUS 391 (1-3) Independent Study—Available to students at the junior level or higher. Requires the completion of a contract, signed by the student, instructor, and department chair.  Contract.

MUS 393 (1-3) Seminar—Study of various issues in the field of music.

NEW TESTAMENT

NT 100 (3) Understanding the New Testament—An introduction to the New Testament that attempts to help students enter into the "three worlds" of the biblical text: the world behind the text, seen in its historical, cultural, and geographical contexts; the world in the text, including its literary forms, story of Jesus and the early church, and major theological themes; and the world in front of the text, involving an exposure to critical methods and issues important to New Testament interpretation and application.

NT 210 (3) The Growth of the New Testament Church—A study of the emergence of Christianity in relation to the historical, religious, and philosophical milieu of the first century.  Attention is given to the birth and development of the apostolic church and the variety of ways in which it witnessed to the revelation of God in Christ. Pre-requisite: NT 100.

NT 300 (3) Synoptic Gospels—A study of the basic teachings of Jesus in the Synoptic Gospels and the Synoptic Problem in light of critical studies. Pre-requisite: NT 100.

NT 320 (3) Prison Epistles—A study of the letters of Paul written in captivity. Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians and Philemon will be examined with special attention given to Pauline Christology.  Pre-requisite: NT 100.

NT 330 (3) Hebrews and General Epistles—Detailed exposition of Hebrews, James, I & II Peter and Jude. Each letter is interpreted in its historical, cultural and literary context. Pre-requisite: NT 100.

NT 340 (3) The New Testament and the End Times—A study of New Testament passages that deal with the end times, especially the Revelation. Various theological interpretations of the data are presented for analysis and discussion. Pre-requisites: OT 100 and NT 100.

NT 350 (3) Writings of John—A study of the Gospel of John and the three Epistles of John. Distinctive literary and theological features of the Johannine literature will be considered. Pre-requisite: NT 100.

NT 391 (1-3) Independent Study—A directed and supervised investigation of a selected research problem or issue in biblical studies, including the preparation of a scholarly paper. A student may not take more than four (4) hours of independent study. Pre-requisites: NT 100, 3.0 GPA and approval of instructor. Contract.

NT 393 (1-3) Seminar—Selected topics in New Testament.

NT 400 (3) Galatians and Romans—An analysis of Paul's letters to Galatia and Rome, with special emphasis on the theological content of Pauline soteriology.  Pre-requisite: NT 100 and one NT course at 300 level.

OFF CAMPUS PROGRAMS

OFC ___ (0-16) —Denotes registration in a study abroad/off campus semester, or indicates registration in a faculty led off campus travel course.  See Undergraduate Special Programs for more details.  Fee.

ORGAN 

ORG 201 (1-2) Private Lessons for Non-Majors—For all non-majors studying private organ. Students registering for 1 credit hour receive a one-half-hour lesson weekly.  Students registering for 2 credit hours receive a one-hour lesson weekly.  Fee.

ORG 211 (1-2) Private Lessons for Underclassmen Music Majors and all Music Minors—Underclassmen music majors and music minors enroll for 4 semesters of private instruction at the 211 level. Students registering for 1 credit hour receive a one-half-hour lesson weekly.  Students registering for 2 credit hours receive a one-hour lesson weekly.  Students selecting a performance emphasis are required to register for 2 credit hours per term Pre-requisite: Acceptance into the music major or music minor by audition as described in the Music Student Handbook.  Fee.

ORG 411 (1-2) Advanced Private Lessons for Upperclassmen Music Majors—Upperclassmen music majors in the B.A. degree program must complete 4 semesters of instruction at the 411 level.  Those electing the Performance Emphasis are required to enroll for 2 credit hours per term.  Students whose emphasis is Composition or Music History are only required two semesters of private lessons at the 411 level—with a demonstration of major instrument proficiency as outlined in the recital guidelines published by the Music Department (available at this website: www.asbury.edu/academics/departments/music/music-home/current-student-forms). Upperclassmen music education majors in the B.S. degree program must complete at least 3 semesters of instruction at the 411 level.  Pre-requisite:  Upperclassman Proficiency Exam passed, as described in the Music Student Handbook.  Fee.

ORG 461, 462 (1 each) Organ Pedagogy and Literature—Introducing point of view, techniques, and some approaches used in teaching of organ literature and materials. Problems of pedagogy, analysis, and performance, as well as important segments of organ repertoire will be studied, extending from the Baroque period through contemporary literature (offered on occasion).

OLD TESTAMENT

OT 100 (3) Understanding the Old Testament—This course is a biblical and theological study of the Old Testament, tracing its sweeping story from creation to the eve of the birth of Christ.  The course emphasizes the Old Testament’s major characters, its history and culture, types of literature, and the themes that unify its message.  It strives to bridge the gap between Christian belief and practice while seeking to demonstrate how the Old Testament provides an indispensable foundation for understanding the New Testament and the Christian Church.

OT 200 (3) Pentateuch—An analysis of the general content and spiritual teachings of each of the first five Old Testament books, with special attention to historical and theological features.  Pre-requisite: OT 100.

OT 210 (3) History of Israel—A study of ancient Israel from the conquest of Canaan to the post-exilic community. The Old Testament historical sources are examined against the background of ancient Near Eastern literature, geography, and archaeology. The course focuses on Israel's historical development within its political, social, and religious context. Pre-requisite: OT 100.

OT 320 (3) Eighth Century Prophets—The prophecies of Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, and Micah examined in their historical, literary, and theological context, utilizing a variety of exegetical approaches. Pre-requisite: OT 100.

OT 330 (3) Wisdom Literature—A study of wisdom in the Old Testament with an emphasis on Job, Proverbs and Ecclesiastes.  Some attention will be given to wisdom in its broader ancient Near Eastern context. Pre-requisite: OT 100.

OT 350 (3) Psalms—Exegetical studies of selected Psalms, focusing upon the meaning and use of the Psalms in their Old Testament setting as well as their continued use in the Church. Pre-requisite: OT 100.

OT 391 (1-3) Independent Study—A directed and supervised investigation of a selected research problem or issue in biblical studies, including the preparation of a scholarly paper. A student may not take more than four (4) hours of independent study. Pre-requisites: OT 100, 3.0 GPA and approval of instructor. Contract.

OT 393 (1-3) Seminar—Selected topics in Old Testament.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE POLICY

  1. PED 100 is a pre-requisite for all PE activity courses except for PE 108 Varsity Sports;
  2. PED 100 and the required traditional undergraduate PE activity course should be completed by the end of the sophomore year; 
  3. No more than one (1) semester hour of PE credit may be taken in any one semester; 
  4. No more than four (4) semester hours of PE may count towards graduation.  This includes credit hours available for varsity sports participation.

PE 106 (1) Personal Fitness—The development of a personal exercise program for the purpose of meeting individual fitness needs.  Seniors only, with permission of the instructor and department chair.  Pre-requisite:  PED 100.  Contract.

PE 107 (1) Weight Control—A study of the principles and values of obtaining and maintaining optimum weight with specific emphasis upon good nutrition (within the framework of the University cafeteria) and upon an exercise program geared to the individual's need.  Open only to those with a weight problem.  Pre-requisite:  PED 100.  Contract.

PE 108 (1) Varsity Athletics—One hour physical education credit may be given for participation in one full season of varsity athletics.  Two hours credit for varsity athletics maximum.  Women's sports:  [Fall] cross-country, soccer, tennis, volleyball; [Spring] basketball, golf, softball, swimming.  Men's sports:  [Fall] cross-country, soccer; [Spring] baseball, basketball, golf, swimming, tennis.  Adding PE 108 credit may change your tuition billing and credit can be declined. Credit/No credit.

PE 110 (1) Cheerleading—Participation in cheerleading activity.  By permission of instructor and tryouts.  May be taken concurrently with PED 100. Three (3) hours maximum credit. Credit/No credit.

PE 111 (1) Physical Activity—consists of two of the following half semester physical activity topics in varying combinations.  Pre-requisite for all classes: PED 100.  See course official schedule for specific combined options each semester. PE 111 may include:

Beginning Archery—Basic fundamentals of shooting safety, etiquette, care of equipment with practice in shooting. Fee.

Beginning Badminton—For students interested in learning the basic fundamentals of badminton.  Included are basic strokes, strategy, rules, and etiquette.

Beginning Basketball—A beginning skill level course designed to develop ability in basketball fundamentals. Drills are used often to facilitate learning.

Intermediate Basketball—A course designed to review the basic fundamental skills of basketball and to include new skills.  Attention will also be given to offensive and defensive formations in game situations.  Pre-requisite: Beginning Basketball.

Beginning Disc Golf—An introduction to skills, rules, strategies, and etiquette of the game. Fee.

Beginning Golf—An introductory course designed to develop proper pre-swing and in-swing fundamentals, putting, golf etiquette, and rules of play. Fee.

Beginning Gymnastics—An introductory gymnastics course in which the student will learn about equipment, safety devices and spotting techniques as well as various gymnastics movements such as rolls, cartwheels and partner stunts.

Paddle Tennis—The basic fundamentals of the game are studied and practiced; grips, strokes, service, court position, footwork, etc.

Beginning Racquetball—The fundamentals of the game are studied and practiced:  grips, strokes, service, court position, footwork, etc.

Beginning Soccer—A beginning skill level course designed to develop ability in soccer fundamentals.  Drills are used to facilitate learning.

Beginning Softball—A beginning skill level course designed to develop the basic fundamentals of softball.  Included are individual and team skills.

Beginning Tennis—The basic fundamentals of the game are studied and practiced:  grips, strokes, service, court position, footwork, etc. 

Intermediate Tennis—Designed to perfect the basic strokes and add new ones, such as the lob, overhead, etc. Time will be spent in doubles play and in working on form and strategy.  Pre-requisite: Beginning Tennis.

Beginning Volleyball—A beginning skill level course designed to develop fundamental volleyball skills as well as a knowledge of the rules and basic formations. Skills included are serve, forearm pass, above-the-face pass, spike and block.

Intermediate Volleyball—A course designed to review the basic fundamental skills of volleyball and to include new skills such as dig, dink, and sprawl. Attention will also be given to offensive and defensive formations for team play. Pre-requisite: Beginning Volleyball.

PE 120 (1) Beginning/Intermediate Weight TrainingFull semester course. PE 120 may include:

Beginning Weight Training—Course offers the student the theory, technique and basic philosophy involved in weight training for strength and endurance.  The student will develop a personalized weight training program. Pre-requisite:  PED 100. 

Intermediate Weight Training—Course offers the student the theory, technique and basic philosophy involved in weight training for strength and endurance.  The student will develop or continue a personalized weight training program.  Pre-requisite: Beginning Weight Training. 

PE 121 (1) Aerobics A conditioning class for the purpose of developing cardiovascular fitness.  The program consists of different endurance exercises such as jogging, circuit training, aerobic dance (running games), etc. Full semester course. (Required for Exercise Science Majors). Pre-requisite:  PED 100. 

PE 122 (1) Fitness Walking—Seeks to improve one’s fitness level by walking often enough (frequency), hard enough (intensity), and long enough (duration) to achieve fitness gains.  Includes health-related (cardiopulmonary, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and body composition) pre-tests and post-tests of physical fitness. Pre-requisite:  PED 100. 

PE 125 (1) Swimming Courses—Full semester or combined half semesters of the following. Pre-requisite:  PED 100.  PE 125 may include:

Beginning Swimming—Instruction in water adjustment, buoyancy, balance, relaxation, propulsive movement and coordinated stroking. Attention to personal safety and general information on hydrodynamics.

Intermediate Swimming—Introduces four major strokes: freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke and butterfly. Further discussion of hydrodynamics and stroke mechanics. Starts and turns are introduced, along with discussion of swimming for a lifetime of fitness. 

Beginning Diving—The fundamentals of the dive are studied:  approach, lap, landing, flight, entry, etc.

Swimmer's Course—Further development of the four major strokes in Intermediate Swimming, as well as competitive stroke development. Further discussion of stroke mechanics, competitive starts and turns. Diving and diving safety will be introduced. Students will learn how swim meets are formatted.

Advanced Swimming—The purpose of this class is to produce outstanding all-around swimmers. The student will be prepared to pursue competitive swimming, if so desired.

PE 130 (1) Beginning Horseback Riding—Provide the basic principles of horseback riding as well as instruction in the care of the equipment and the animal. Pre-requisite:  PED 100.  Fee.

PE 131 (1) Intermediate Horseback Riding—Review of the basic fundamentals learned in Beginning Horseback Riding and to introduce new skill including riding at the trot and canter.  Pre-requisite:  Beginning Horseback Riding. Pre-requisite:  PED 100.  Fee.

PE 138 (1) Advanced Gymnastics—One hour physical education credit for participation in one full season on the Asbury University Tumbling Team. Three (3) hours maximum credit. Credit/No credit. Pre-requisite:  PED 100. 

PE 280 (1) Lifeguard Training—Instruction given in accordance with the American Red Cross.  Students who complete requirements successfully will be certified as lifeguards with certification in CPR, First Aid, Head Lifeguarding, Waterfront Guard, as well as general lifeguarding. Pre-requisite: PED 100.  Fee.

PE 300 (1) Water Safety Instructor/Fundamentals of Instructor Training—This class is designed to instruct Level 5 and above swimmers on how to teach swimming lessons and run a successful swimming lesson program.  Upon completion of the course you will have American Red Cross Certification for both Water Safety Instruction and for Fundamentals of Instructor Training. Pre-requisite: PED 100.  Fee.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PED 100 (1) Theory of Wellness—An introduction to the development and maintenance of a healthy lifestyle for the purpose of achieving the highest potential for well-being in all dimensions of wellness.  Emphasis is placed on health-related fitness and the course includes individual fitness prescriptions.  A variety of fitness assessments are administered.  Required for all students.

PED 200 (3) Introduction to Coaching—A lecture/discussion course designed to introduce students to the profession of coaching.  The course is applicable to any student interested in coaching in the school and/or non-school setting.  The course will examine the principles of coaching as they relate to areas such as the roles and responsibilities of the coach, the types of coaches, the organization of a sport team, sport organizations, motivation, competition, leadership, sportsmanship, team dynamics and available resources for use in coaching.  Requires a field component.  Pre-requisite to PED 205 and 206.

PED 205 (1-2) Coaching Practicum I—Practical experience in a specific sport under the supervision of a sport specific coach.  Identifies skills, techniques in game situations, strategies, scouting, conditioning, practice planning. Requires a field component.  Pre-requisite: PED 200. Contract.

PED 206 (2) Coaching Practicum II—Same as PED 205 but must be in a sport different from that in PED 205.  Pre-requisite: PED 200. Contract.

PED 210 (3) Introduction to Health and Physical Education—Study of the philosophical, historical, and contemporary issues of health/physical education, exercise science, and sport management.  Includes study of organizations, careers, and a field component.

PED 228 (1) Practicum—Forty (40) hours of practical experience and observation in selected professional settings.  Contract.

PED 261 (3) Psychology/Sociology of Physical Education/Sport—A survey of the psychological and sociological concepts which are relevant to physical education and sport. Topics include personality, motivation, competition, group and team dynamics, leadership, sportsmanship, sport in society, history, and current issues.

PED 275 (3) Principles of Administration in Exercise-Related Professions—A study of basic management components used in the administration of programs in the exercise-related professions.  The course combines theory and concepts with concentration on practical strategies for skill development in administration and leadership for professionals in physical education, athletics, athletic trainers, fitness specialists, and intramural and recreational sport administrators.

PED 300 (2) Sports Officiating—Theory and practice of sports officiating.  Emphasis is given to philosophy of officiating, responsibilities and qualities of officials; the study and interpretation of rules.  Requires earning KHSAA (or equivalent) officials rating.

PED 301 (2) Coaching Individual and Dual Sports—Study of the current trends and various aspects of coaching individual and dual sports such as tennis, cross country and swimming.  Methods of training/conditioning, rules, practice organization, scheduling, event management, and skill/strategy components.

PED 302 (2) Coaching Baseball/Softball—Theory and practice in coaching baseball and softball with emphasis on strategy.  Includes philosophy, skill techniques, conditioning/training, practice, organization, contest management and scheduling.

PED 303 (2) Coaching Basketball—Various aspects of coaching basketball. Includes philosophy, skill/strategy techniques, conditioning/training, practice organization, contest management, and scheduling.

PED 304 (2) Coaching Soccer—Theory and practice of coaching soccer. Includes strategy, philosophy, skill techniques, conditioning/training, rules, practice organization, contest management, and scheduling.

PED 305 (2) Coaching Volleyball—Various aspects of coaching volleyball.  Includes philosophy, skill/strategy techniques, conditioning/training, practice organization, contest management, and scheduling.

PED 321 (1) Adaptive Physical Education—Examines various special needs and the application of pedagogical techniques.  This course addresses topics applicable to a variety of professional settings including, but not necessarily limited to, gymnasiums and fitness and rehabilitation facilities.  Requires a field component.

PED 360 (3) Sport Skills I—A lecture/activity-based course designed to allow students the opportunity to acquire the knowledge, skill and technique to instruct the fundamental skills in activities such as badminton, bowling, golf, soccer, tennis and volleyball. Requires a field component.  Fee.

PED 361 (3) Sport Skills II—A lecture/activity-based course designed to allow students the opportunity to acquire the knowledge, skill and technique to instruct the fundamental skills in activities such as aerobics, archery, basketball, gymnastics, orienteering, rhythm, softball, track and field, and weight training. Requires a field component.  Fee.

PED 391 (1-3) Independent Study—A directed and supervised investigation of a selected problem/topic in the area of PED, mutually agreed upon by the student and professor.  Available to senior PED majors.  A student may take up to six (6) hours of independent studies.  Contract.

PED 393 (1-3) Seminar—The study of various issues/topics various departmental majors.  Topics will be determined and announced for each semester a seminar course is offered.

PED 461 (3) Statistics and Evaluation in Physical Education & Exercise Science—Emphasis is placed on statistical techniques for the purpose of evaluating health-related and skill-related components of physical fitness.  The course also examines the construction, selection, administration and assessment of testing instruments in physical education and exercise science.  Requires a field component.

PED 475 (1) Senior Capstone—A course for departmental majors where students are asked to integrate and assess their skills, experience, and professional knowledge. Fee.

PHILOSOPHY 

PHL 200 or PHL 231 serve as Pre-requisite to all other PHL courses.

PHL 200 (3) Introduction to Philosophy—Introduction to the nature, methods, and purposes of philosophical inquiry. Investigates major topics such as reality, knowledge, and ethics. Surveys and evaluates important world views in an attempt to formulate a Christian world view.

PHL 211 (3) Ancient & Medieval Philosophy—Surveys the development of philosophical thought from the ancient Greeks to the late medieval period. Emphasis is placed on the philosophy of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas. 

PHL 212 (3) Modern Philosophy—Surveys the development of philosophical thought during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Primarily studies Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Hume, Reid, and Kant.

PHL 221 (3) Logic—Analyzes the methods of correct reasoning; covers propositional logic, term logic, and modern quantification theory. Employs symbolic notation while remaining sensitive to ordinary discourse.  Some attention to informal fallacies. 

PHL 231 (3) Ethics—Studies the major thinkers and positions in the field of ethics with attention to their relation to Christian thinking related to moral life.  Among the views studied are forms of utilitarianism, Kantianism, hedonism, and virtue theory.

PHL 251 (3) Philosophy of C. S. Lewis—A study of the philosophical works of Lewis dealing with arguments for the existence of God based on human rationality, the problem of suffering, objective truth, and moral law.  Addresses philosophical themes in the Narnia Chronicles and Lewis’ thought in relation to popular culture.  Includes viewing and discussion of pertinent videos. 

PHL 293 (3) Seminar—Selects a significant issue, problem, theme, or thinker for intensive study. 

PHL 312 (3) Epistemology (Theory of Knowledge)—Investigates the nature of human knowledge and belief.  Addresses issues related to the sources, justification, and types of knowledge. Major epistemological theories are compared and contrasted.

PHL 322 (3) Metaphysics (Theory of Reality)—Employs a combination of classical and contemporary sources to discuss issues related to the nature and structure of reality. Each offering of this course selects from a range of issues to cover: substance, matter and mind, free will and determinism, space and time, the relation of logic and ontology, and the like. 

PHL 343 (3) Political and Social Philosophy—Surveys the nature and development of political and social theories with special interest in those factors which give cohesion to human community. Ideas pertaining to humanity, justice, law, and the social good are addressed. 

PHL 361 (3) Philosophy of Religion—Surveys the classic topics in the field, such as the theistic arguments, the problem of evil, miracles, religious language, and the divine attributes. Also considers alternative approaches to the subject, such as fideism, natural theology, and Reformed epistemology. 

PHL 372 (3) Philosophy of Science—Explores the presuppositions, methods, and role of science as a knowledge-seeking enterprise. Reviews major philosophies of science, such as positivism, Kuhnianism, and realism.  

PHL 391 (1-3) Independent Study—Offered by consent of a supervising instructor. A topic is established by negotiation with instructor. A student may not take more than 3 hours per semester. Contract. 

PHL 393 (1-3) Seminar—Selects a significant issue, theme, problem, or thinker for intensive and rigorous study. Conducted in seminar style; a major paper is required.  Pre-requisite: 9 hours in PHL including PHL 200. 

PHL 411 (3) Philosophical Theology—Applies the methods of philosophical elucidation to major Christian doctrines, such as Creation, Revelation, Incarnation, Atonement, and the like. Seeks to clarify understanding of and trace the implications of the central concepts of these doctrines.

PHL 412 (3) Contemporary Philosophy—Concentrates on the analytic movement in philosophy, which shaped the tone of professional Anglo-American philosophy.  The course surveys the work of such thinkers as Moore, Russell, Ayer, and Carnap, Quine, Strawson, and others.  It usually features Wittgenstein for very concentrated study.  Where possible, reference is made to other contemporary movements such as: existentialism, phenomenology, and postmodern hermeneutics.

PREP FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

PHP 209 (1) Introduction to the Health Professions—An introduction to the various health care professions and topics of current interest in health care using a seminar format. Half the course focuses on situational biomedical ethics. Credit/No credit. Pre-requisites: sophomore standing or pre‑registration with Health Professions Advisor. (on occasion) 

PHP 302 (1-2) Medical Admission Exams Preparation—Devoted to preparing pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-pharmacy students for the MCAT, DAT, and PCAT exams. Credit/No Credit.  Fee.

PHP 435 (1) Internship—Spending a minimum of forty hours with one of the health care professions provides an opportunity for the student to observe one of the health‑care professions first hand. The student is responsible for the initial contact with the professional with whom he or she wishes to work. Credit/No credit. Contract.

PHYSICS

PHY 201, 202 (4 each) Introductory Physics—An introductory course in physics designed for Chemistry and Biology majors.  Concepts from calculus will be used to explain various equations.  Topics covered include mechanics of solids and fluids, heat, wave motion, electricity, magnetism and modern physics.  This course satisfies the foundational requirement for a natural science.  Pre-requisite: MAT 181 or MAT 132 or equivalent.  Three hours lecture and one 3-hour lab/week. Fee.

PHY 211, 212 (5 each) General Physics—A calculus-based introductory course in physics designed for mathematics and engineering majors. Topics covered include mechanics of solids and fluids, heat, wave motion, electricity, magnetism and modern physics. This course satisfies the foundational requirement for a natural science. Pre-requisite: MAT 181, 182.  Three hours lecture, one and one-half hours recitation, and one 3-hour lab/week. Fee. (alternate years)

PHY 311 (3) Modern Physics—This course covers the quantum mechanics of simple systems, atoms, and molecules; and atomic and molecular spectroscopy, including electronic, vibrational, and rotational spectroscopy. Three hours of lecture and one 3-hour lab per week. The course runs for 2/3 to 3/4 of the semester and is intended to be followed by PHY 314. Pre-requisite: PHY 211 and 212; MAT 181 and 182. Fee. Alternate years.

PHY 314 (1) Relativity—This course studies the foundations of special relativity. It emphasizes problem solving as a means to give students an understanding and an intuition of space-time. In addition, the course presents a modest introduction to General Relativity. Because of the importance of differential geometry in modern theories of dynamics, it includes the basics of differential forms and their application to electricity and magnetism.

PHY 382 (3) Analytical Vector Mechanics—Vector treatment of the statics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies including Lagrangian mechanics. Pre-requisites: MAT 252; PHY 211, 212  (alternate years)

PHY 393 (1) Seminar—Discussion of selected topics.  May be offered in conjunction with other departments or as a separate course. (on occasion)

PHY 400 (1-2 hours) Special Problems in Physics—Independent research in student's preferred area of physics. Pre-requisites: 6 hours or more of upper division physics. Not more than 6 hours may apply toward graduation. Fee.

PIANO 

PNO 100 (1) Beginning Piano for Pleasure—Class designed for non-major, adult beginners at the piano.  By playing a variety of attractive styles, students develop technical skills while learning basic fundamentals of music notation, rhythm, improvisation.  Class meets once weekly.  Students may proceed to private piano lessons after successful completion of the course.

PNO 130 (1) Piano Service Playing—Designed to allow the student to develop piano skills for leadership in the church.  Skills developed will include improvising congregational accompaniments in various styles, preparing piano solos appropriate for the church service, and accompanying.  The student must be able to play the piano on an intermediate level and read four-part music in order to be successful in the class.

PNO 151 (1) Beginning Functional Piano—Designed for non-keyboard music majors/minors who are beginners at the piano. Students learn to read piano music, developing two-hand coordination by playing two- and three-part studies. Other emphases include sight-reading melodies, harmonizing melodies using primary chords, transposing, and improvising. Class meets twice weekly. PNO 151 taken concurrently with MTH 111 or MTH 112. Credit/No Credit.

PNO 152 (1) Elementary Functional Piano—Designed for non-keyboard music majors/minors. Students play more challenging repertoire in two/three parts and several major and minor scales. Other emphases include sight-reading parts of ensembles and simple two-part piano pieces; reading two-part vocal scores; harmonizing with primary, secondary, and secondary dominant chords; transposing simple pieces; and improvising with set patterns. Class meets twice weekly. PNO 152 taken concurrently with MTH 111 or MTH 112. Pre-requisite: PNO 151. Credit/No Credit.

PNO 161 (1) Advanced Functional Piano IDesigned for keyboard music majors/minors. Skills include music-reading; vocal score-reading of two-four parts; instrumental score-reading involving music for strings, woodwinds, and brass; and basic adapting of hymns in congregational styles. Credit/No Credit.

PNO 162 (1) Advanced Functional Piano II—Designed for keyboard music majors/minors. Skills include transposing pieces and patterns of accompaniment; transposing chord progressions involving primary chords, secondary chords, secondary dominants, fully-diminished seventh chords, and modulation; harmonizing and by-ear playing using appropriate styles of accompaniment. Pre-requisite: PNO 161. Credit/No Credit.

PNO 201 (1-2) Private Lessons for Non-Majors—For all non-majors studying private keyboard,  wind, string or percussion instruments. Students registering for 1 credit hour receive a one-half-hour lesson weekly.  Students registering for 2 credit hours receive a one-hour lesson weekly.  Pre-requisite: PNO 100 or permission by audition with Coordinator of Keyboard Studies.  Fee.

PNO 211 (1-2) Private Lessons for Underclassmen Music Majors and all Music Minors—Underclassmen music majors and music minors enroll for 4 semesters of private instruction at the 211 level. Students registering for 1 credit hour receive a one-half-hour lesson weekly.  Students registering for 2 credit hours receive a one-hour lesson weekly.  Students selecting a performance emphasis are required to register for 2 credit hours per term Pre-requisite: Acceptance into the music major or music minor by audition as described in the Music Student Handbook.  Fee.

PNO 251 (1) Intermediate Functional Piano—Designed for non-keyboard music majors. The Piano Proficiency is administered during the course. Review of skills learned in PNO 152. Other emphases include playing accompaniments of vocal and instrumental pieces; preparing three-part vocal and two-part instrumental scores; sight-reading parts from choral/instrumental scores; harmonizing tunes played by ear; playing pieces in four parts. Class meets twice weekly. PNO 251 taken concurrently with MTH 231. Pre-requisite: PNO 152. Credit/No Credit.

PNO 261, 262 (0.5 each) Piano Accompanying I, II—Designed for piano majors, except for those whose emphasis is Church Music. Students develop their skills in piano accompanying by accompanying a one half-hour vocal lesson per week during two semesters. Furthermore, students will participate in three monthly coaching sessions per semester.

PNO 361, 362 (1 each) Piano Pedagogy—Designed for piano majors and other students preparing to teach piano.  Emphasis is placed upon business aspects of maintaining a studio; survey/evaluation of methods, materials, and techniques for teaching young pianists; observation of piano teachers; supervised piano teaching. Pre-requisite: Consent of the instructor (offered on occasion).

PNO 371 (1) Piano Literature—Piano Literature is a course designed for the piano major pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Music with emphasis in Performance.  The course includes a brief survey of some of the best literature for solo piano composed during the 18th through 20th centuries.  To be taken concurrently with Piano Pedagogy, PNO 362.  (Offered on occasion.)

PNO 411 (1-2) Advanced Private Lessons for Upperclassmen Music Majors—Upperclassmen music majors in the B.A. degree program must complete 4 semesters of instruction at the 411 level.  Those electing the Performance Emphasis are required to enroll for 2 credit hours per term.  Students whose emphasis is Composition or Music History are only required two semesters of private lessons at the 411 level—with a demonstration of major instrument proficiency as outlined in the recital guidelines published by the Music Department (available at this website: www.asbury.edu/academics/departments/music/music-home/current-student-forms). Upperclassmen music education majors in the B.S. degree program must complete at least 3 semesters of instruction at the 411 level.  Pre-requisite:  Upperclassman Proficiency Exam passed, as described in the Music Student Handbook.  Fee.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PS 101 (3) American Politics and Government—Designed to enable students to understand American political dynamics in an era of gridlock and red state/blue state tensions, this course begins with the Founders’ arguments about the nature of the regime they designed in 1787.  Following an examination of the structure and politics of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government, the course covers critical topics in current American politics, such as interest group behavior, political parties, the federal budget, the media, shifting national demographics, and political culture and ideologies.

PS 201 (3) State and Local Politics and Government—Though knowledge of national politics is important for effective citizenship, Americans are most likely to engage with the political system at the state and local levels.  This course acquaints students with the dynamics of state government and politics, which vary substantially across the nation, and of local governing entities such as city councils, county governments, school boards, zoning commissions, regional development agencies, and so forth.

PS 202 (3) History and Politics of the U.S. Constitution—Originally created as a relatively simple structure for a functioning government, the U.S. Constitution has become layered and complicated over the decades through amendments and, more importantly, judicial and regulatory decisions about how the provisions of the document are to be interpreted.  This course examines changes over time in the Supreme Court, and how its interpretations of constitutional provisions have affected American political life.  Special topics include civil rights and affirmative action, freedom of speech, church/state concerns, human life issues, campaign finance, and state’s rights.

PS 205 (3) Markets and Politics—A survey of political economy, this course explores the two fundamental—and opposing—principles for organizing societies and economies:  markets and politics.  It begins with reading selections from the two most famous advocates for these positions, namely Adam Smith and Karl Marx, but also includes a historical and theological section on development of the concept of the market.  The latter part of the course covers more recent work on the uses of politics and markets by scholars such as John Kenneth Galbraith and Charles Lindblom, as well as the collapse of command-and-control economic systems and the “triumph” of markets.

PS 300 (3) Washington Federal Seminar—A study of the actual and potential role of evangelical Christians in elected, appointed and career positions in the federal government. Includes approximately two weeks of formal classroom time for a survey of American national government and a one week intensive intercollegiate Federal Seminar in Washington D.C. Travel and on site costs in Washington are in addition to tuition.  A GPA of 2.50 or better is required.  Fee.

PS 301 (3) Comparative Politics—A Global Perspective on Governmental Forms--An introduction to the basics of comparative analysis of non-American political systems, the course provides an overview of alternative governmental approaches, from totalitarian and socialist regimes to constitutional and parliamentary democracies to authoritarian regimes and dictatorships.  The course also includes case studies of numerous nations as they have operated under such regimes, including selected countries from Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America.

PS 302 (3) International Relations: Theory and Practice in Influencing Nations—An overview of the most prominent theories for understanding how nations operate relative to one another, this course centers on the two most prominent streams of work in this arena, the idealist and realist schools of thought.  Against this backdrop, students will also examine more recent versions of Marxism, critical theory, and functionalism, which each vie for prominence in the field.  Students will consider many case studies that enable them to view geopolitical events through these interpretive lenses.

PS 303 (3) Presidential Leadership and Power in America—An invigorating and time-honored approach to the study of American politics is to examine the institution of the presidency.  This course revisits the debate among the founders about the nature of the chief executive in a federal republic, and provides a detailed analysis of the shifts in presidential powers, roles, and leadership styles that have occurred over many decades.  The course provides special attention to the historical context of the presidents and the interactions of events with their personalities and political beliefs.  It concludes with discussion of the recent debates over appropriate presidential power in the age of global terrorism.

PS 304 (3) American Political Ideology and Culture—The political map of the U.S. is constantly evolving, as people move in and out of regions of the country, as they move across rural, urban, and suburban areas, as immigrants bring different languages and political habits to the nation, as the economy shifts, as issues and problems wax and wane, and as Americans’ expectations about government change.  This course traces many of these changes over the nation’s history, and concentrates on the current “red,” “blue,” and “purple” configuration so prominently discussed in the media and political circles.  Students will understand how demography, urban city, region, political parties, and culture affect political ideology and voting habits. 

PS 305 (3) Politics and Public Policy Making—A macro level view of the interrelationship between politics and policy making, this course examines the major theoretical approaches developed for understanding shifts in policy over time and across domains of public life.  Assuming that “disjointed incrementalism” describes the typical process by which policy evolves, students then consider various frameworks to explain non-incremental change in policy structures, such as the multiple streams approach or the advocacy network approach.  Includes an array of case studies at the national and state level in policy arenas such as health care, pension reform, education, and transportation.

PS 306 (3) 18th through 20th Century Political Thought—This course builds on the ancient, medieval, and modern philosophical thinkers encountered in PHL 211 and 212, and acquaints students with more recent figures in political philosophy, beginning roughly with Montesquieu and moving through Rousseau, Tocqueville, Mill, and Marx.  Concludes with a discussion of the combination of ideas that undergirds major political regimes found around the world.

PS 307 (3) American Foreign Policy—This course offers an exploration of the politics of American foreign policy from the 1750s through the War or Terror era.  By working through several carefully chosen books in this field, students will see not an isolationist people but a nation for which active foreign affairs has always been a pivotal matter.  Students will also consider the development of several major schools of thought on the proper role of America vis-à-vis other major and minor powers, how these perspectives have shifted over the decades, and how they manifest themselves today in political debates about foreign policy, especially with regard to wars, alliances, and how the US uses its economic and military power around the world.

PS 325 (3) Public Policy—An understanding of the practice of administration in public organizations.  The course will include an analysis of budget structure and process; revenue structure and administration; and public capital acquisition and debt management.  Emphasizes an applied focus and comparative analysis of alternative management structures and strategies.  Explores ethical dimensions in the public sector and examines ethics in connection with policy development.

PS 391 (1-3) Independent Study—A directed and supervised study of a selected research problem including the preparation of a scholarly paper.  Contract.

PS 393 (1-3) Seminar—Designated special-interest classes, seminars, or field experiences supervised by faculty, with the appropriate course requirements.  Credit may be given more than once.

PS 401 (3) Religion and Secularization in American Politics—An exploration of America as a “Christian nation,” this course considers the relationship among culture, religion, and politics in the U.S. over time.  One part of the course focuses on the role of religion in the founding of America.  Another examines religious practices, laws, and policies in the states over the decades.  Particular emphasis will be placed on the last 40 years or so in the nation’s history, during which time references to God, Christianity, and religion in general have been drastically reduced in public life.

PS 402 (3) Theories of Liberalism—An examination of the classical concept of liberalism that is fundamental to American political philosophy, the course begins with the enlightenment era conceptions of liberty.  The course also examines how the American version of liberalism influenced major debates and episodes in the nation’s history.  Also covers modern conceptions of liberalism, including the so-called “deontological” versions popular in recent years, as well as reactions against modern liberalism that have given rise to such things as the neoconservative and communitarian movements.

PS 403 (3) Education and Politics—Numerous important political thinkers through the ages have given special attention to the design of education systems, or have laid down principles for educating children and youth.  This course considers the education thought of several such figures, with special attention to the relationship between learning and various goals for individuals or society, such as living a good life or participating in civic affairs.  The final portion of the course is devoted to the political and philosophical currents undergirding the American education system.

PS 435 (3) Internship in Politics—Students are placed in settings with a political focus, such as legislative or executive branch offices in Washington, DC or state capitols, political party headquarters, interest group offices, think tanks, political research firms, or international organizations.  Students will negotiate specific projects to work on during their internships, and written reports will be submitted by the office and by the student to the professor.  This is an option for the student and will be tailored to fit the student’s needs to the greatest extent possible.  Consent of the instructor must be secured.  Students may accumulate up to 6 hours of credit toward the major through internship.

PSYCHOLOGY 

PSY 101 (3)  Psychology and Everyday LifeThis course introduces students to the foundational principles of psychology, emphasizing the nature of psychology as a social-behavioral science through the examination of several specific areas, including social behavior, personality, psychological disorders, psychotherapy, motivation, emotions, intelligence, stress and health, learning, physiological studies, sensation, perception, consciousness, development, memory, and thinking.  Another principal objective of this course is to introduce students to the science and profession of psychology as seen from a Christian world view. This is recommended for all PSY courses and required for some PSY  courses.  Fulfills the Social Sciences component of the Core and is required for students majoring or minoring in Psychology.

PSY 201 (3) Developmental Psychology across the Lifespan—This course provides an introduction to the major principles of developmental psychology across the lifespan, from conception to old age.  Emphasis is placed on theory and data relating to the developmental aspects of cognitive, biosocial, psychosocial, and spiritual functioning.  PSY 201 is an elective course for psychology majors and minors. Recommended first: PSY 101 or SOC 101.

PSY 210 (3) Social Psychology—A study of the ways in which individuals think about, influence, and relate to other people. A scientific analysis of human social behavior.   Recommended first: PSY 101 or SOC 101.

PSY 220 (3) Stress Management—Designed to increase awareness of factors that help or hinder personal adjustment to life events and situations.  Stress inoculation, stress management, and coping resources are emphasized.  Recommended first: PSY 101.

PSY 275 (1) Survey of Psychology-related Careers—Designed for any student interested in the range of career paths open to psychology majors.  Surveys careers in counseling, psychotherapy, psychological assessment, social and human services, residential care, forensic applications and settings, teaching (high school or college/university), research, industrial/organizational, psychiatry and other medical specialties, psychiatric nursing, and church/para-church/missions applications.  Job search strategies, steps and tools are detailed.  Intended to be taken concurrently with PSY276 during Fall of Sophomore year.  Recommended first: PSY 101.

PSY 276 (1) Writing for Behavioral Sciences—Students will learn  the format and style advocated by the American Psychological Association. Intended to be taken concurrently with PSY275 during Fall of Sophomore year.

PSY 315 (3) Statistics for Behavioral Science—An introduction to descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and probability with emphasis on the application of these statistical procedures to experimentation. It is recommended for PSY majors to take this concurrently with PSY372 in the Fall of Junior year.   Pre-requisite: MAT 120 or equivalent.  Fee. 

PSY 320 (3) Psychology of Gender— Examines psychobiological, sociopsychological, evolutionary, and developmental perspectives on gender. Integrates theories of gender into a Christian worldview.  Recommended first: PSY 101.

PSY 322 (3) Equine Facilitated Mental Health—Provides an introduction to the fields of equine-assisted therapies and equine-assisted personal development. The different approaches, varieties of therapeutic settings, and special populations served are addressed. Recommended first: PSY 101.   

PSY 330 (3) Cognitive Psychology—Explores the current and historical theories, research findings and methodologies associated with topics relating to various information processing tasks.  Perception, attention, memory, knowledge representation and organization, language, reasoning, and problem solving.  Pre-requisite: PSY 101.

PSY 335  (3) Sports Psychology—The examination of psychological implications for sport and exercise including but not limited to the following topics: sport and exercise related motivation, arousal and anxiety factors in the athlete, cognitive and behavioral interventions for improved performance, the social psychology of sport, and the psychobiology of sport.  Pre-requisites:  PSY 101 or SOC 100.

PSY 340 (3) Forensic Psychology—Provides an introduction to the major theories and issues related to the practice of forensic psychology.  Emphasis is placed on the application and practice of psychology in both the civil and criminal justice systems with the following topics examined in depth:  police and investigative psychology, family forensic psychology, psychology of crime and delinquency, victimology and victim services, legal psychology, expert witness testimony, consulting psychology, and correctional psychology.  Pre-requisites: PSY 101 or SOC 100. Recommended: PSY 360.

PSY 341 (3) History and Systems of Psychology—Historical development, description and explanation of different schools of thought in psychology. An integrated understanding of modern psychology.  Pre-requisite: PSY 101.

PSY 342 (3) Cross-Cultural Psychology—Examines the effects of culture on the way people think, act, feel, adapt to their environments, and relate to others.  Explores various psychological processes across global cultures including emotion, personality, cognition, perception, communication, development, gender concepts, abnormal psychology, treatment, self and identity, and social behaviors and interactions. [*Course does NOT satisfy the Cross-Cultural Experience requirement.]  Pre-requisite: PSY 101.

PSY 351 (3) Counseling and Psychotherapy I—An introduction to the various theories, techniques, and issues related to the practice of counseling and psychotherapy.  Integration of applied psychology, Wesleyan theology, and Christian spirituality are emphasized.  Pre-requisite:  PSY 101.

PSY 352 (3) Counseling and Psychotherapy II—Advancement of the student's knowledge of the practice of counseling and psychotherapy.  Introductory helping skill development is emphasized through supervised training experience with a systematic model.  Pre-requisite: PSY 351.

PSY 360 (3) Abnormal Psychology—Studies abnormal behavior and psychological disorders with consideration of causal factors, symptom patterns, and treatment options. Pre-requisite: PSY 101.

PSY 365 (3) Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood—This course will examine the biological, cognitive, social, spiritual, and psychological development from adolescence into emerging adulthood as well as the roles of history, culture, religion / spirituality, and social experiences in the family, peer group, school, and community in shaping aspects of this development.  Emphasis will be given to the theories, research, and general principles associated with development during these two periods of life.  Pre-requisites:  PSY101 or SOC 100. Recommended: PSY 201, ED 230, SW 251, or SW 252.

PSY 368 (3) Child and School Psychology—This course provides an overview of childhood disorders and introduces students to field of school psychology.  This course will review the symptom patterns, prevalence, causal factors, and treatment options of behavior and mental disorders in children and teens, while also exploring the role of a school psychologist in assessment, consultation, and intervention services within the school setting.   Pre-requisites:  PSY101 or SOC 100. Recommended: PSY 201, PSY 360, ED 230, SW 251, or SW 252. 

PSY 372 (3) Experimental Psychology—Procedures utilizing experimental design are learned and used in undertaking classroom experiments dealing with a variety of topics in psychology and related fields.  Intended to be taken concurrently with PSY 315 and PSY373 during Fall of Junior year. Pre-requisites: PSY 101, PSY 276, Pre/Co-requisite: PSY 315, Co-requisite: PSY 373.  Fee.

PSY 373 (1) Experimental Psychology Lab—In conjunction with Psy372, this course allows students to use the methodologies and tools of psychological research.  Students will design and implement their own research designs, and then analyze and communicate the results in both written and oral formats. Pre-requisites: PSY 101, PSY 276, Co-requisite: PSY 372, Pre/Co-requisite: PSY 315. 

PSY 375 (1) Integration and Vocation Seminar—Explores the relationship between Christianity and psychology as a science and helps students clarify their own calling as Christian psychologists. Intended to be taken concurrently with PSY 376 in Spring of Junior year. Pre-requisite: PSY 276, Co-requisite PSY376, and full acceptance into PSY program.

PSY 376 (1) Pre-Professional Seminar—Students will be informed about all aspects of graduate school (preparation, application, success) as well as how to prepare for job hunting and occupational success after undergraduate life. Intended to be taken concurrently with PSY 375 in Spring of Junior year. Pre-requisite PSY 275, Co-requisite PSY375, and full acceptance into PSY program.

PSY 381 (3) Physiological Psychology—Physiological explanation of behavior, primarily in the areas of sensation, motivation, learning, and memory.  Pre-requisites: PSY 101 and BIO 100 (or equivalent).

PSY 391 (1-3) Independent Study—An in‑depth study of a given problem area of interest to the student. Designed for students who plan graduate studies in psychology or for those who desire to enhance their own personal development. No more than a total of five hours of Independent Study or any practicum experience may apply toward the major. Pre-requisites: PSY majors only and permission of professor.  Contract. 

PSY 393 (1-3) Seminar—Study of various topics of psychological theory, research, and application.  Recommended: PSY 101.

PSY 435 (1-3) Clinical/Counseling Practicum—Provides a practicum experience in a clinical/counseling context in order to expose the student to practical applications of psychology in real world settings.  No more than a total of five hours of Independent Study or any practicum experience may apply toward the major. Pre/Co-requisites: PSY 351, 352, and 360.  PSY majors only and permission of professor. Contract.

PSY 436 (1-3) Research Practicum—Provides a practicum experience in a research context in order to expose the student to practical applications of psychology in real world settings.  No more than a total of five hours of Independent Study or any practicum experience may apply toward the major. Pre-requisites: PSY 315, and 372.  PSY majors only and permission of professor. Contract.  Fee.

PSY 437 (1-3) Teaching Practicum—Provides a practicum experience in an educational context in order to expose the student to practical applications of psychology in real world settings.  No more than a total of five hours of Independent Study or any practicum experience may apply toward the major. Pre-requisite: PSY 101.  PSY majors only and permission of professor. Contract.

PSY 442 (3) Psychology of Religion—Relates modern psychological theory, research, and practice to the study of religious experience. Selected aspects of psychology are also examined in the light of the Christian religion.  Recommended: PSY 101.

PSY 445 (3) Christian Counseling Methods—This course provides an introduction to and survey of the most common patently “Christian” models of counseling. It supplements PSY 351 (which surveys the standard secular counseling models and critiques each from a Christian perspective) and PSY 352 (which introduces students to a basic counseling model and gives them practice in using that model). Neither PSY 351 nor 352 introduces students in any depth to strictly Christian models. Students who end up working in Christian religious settings or for Christian organizations may find it helpful to know about counseling models that were created in and for Christian settings and which make use of Christian language, concepts, and resources. Pre-requisites: PSY 101, PSY 351. (PSY 352 highly recommended)

PSY 452 (3) Psychology of Personality—An examination of personality structure, dynamics, and development emphasizing major theoretical perspectives and current research.  Pre-requisite: PSY 101.

PSY 454 (3) Expressive TherapiesThis course provides a comprehensive introduction to and survey of the most common forms of expressive therapies including art, music, movement, drama, writing, play, sand tray, and integrative approaches as they are used with persons across the lifespan both individually and in groups. The ways in which these creative therapies can be used along with traditional forms of psychotherapy will also be explored.  Although the course by itself does not prepare students to be professional expressive therapists, it will help students understand what the practice of these therapies might be like and will give students information about what would be involved in pursuing these career paths.  Pre-requisites: PSY 101, PSY 351. (PSY 352 highly recommended)

PSY 462 (3) Psychological Assessment—Acquaints the student with various theories, techniques, and issues in the practice of psychological assessment.  Pre-requisites: PSY 101, and PSY 360.

PSY 472 (3) Psychology of Learning and Motivation—A comparison of theoretical explanations of the causes of behavior and behavior change, and of the empirical evidence on which they are based.  Pre-requisite: PSY 101.

PSY 475 (2) Senior Seminar—Requires students to demonstrate their understanding of psychology (including ethical issues in psychology and the integration with Christianity) and related skills (including library research, written communication, and APA writing style) through written papers and comprehensive summative assessments. Intended to be taken in Fall or Spring of Senior year. Pre-requisites: PSY 276 and Senior PSY majors only.

RECITALS

RCT 041 (0) Recital Attendance—Required of music majors/minors.  Music majors: 8 consecutive semesters;  Music Education majors: 7 semesters (student teaching semester is exempt);  Music minors: 4 semesters.  Credit/No Credit.

RCT 280 (1) Elective Music Recital—Non-required recital (requires approval of the music faculty).  This recital consists of 22-24 minutes of music. Fee.

RCT 380 (1) Junior Recital—Required only of music majors with an emphasis in performance.  This recital consists of 26-29 minutes of music.

RCT 480 (1) Senior Recital—Required only of music majors (B.A.) with an emphasis in Church Music Leadership or music majors (B.A.) without an emphasis.  This recital consists of 26-29 minutes of music.

RCT 481 (.5) Senior Recital—Required only of music majors with an emphasis in Composition/Arranging or in Music History.  This recital consists of 10 minutes of music performed with the student’s major instrument.

RCT 482 (.5) Senior Recital—Required only of music majors with an emphasis in Composition/Arranging or in Music History.  This recital consists of a 20-minute Music History/Literature Lecture (for students with an emphasis in Music History) or 16-20 minutes of music composed or arranged by those students whose emphasis is Composition and Arranging.
RCT 483 (.5 or 1 cr. with approval) Senior Recital—Required only of music education majors.  This recital consists of 14-15 minutes of music for .5 credit or 26-29 minutes of music for a 1 credit recital, which requires music department approval.
RCT 484 (2) Senior Performance Recital—Required of students completing the emphasis in (INS, ORG, PNO) Music Performance.  This recital consists of 50-55 minutes of music performed with the student’s major instrument.

RCT 485 (2) Senior Vocal Performance Recital—Required of vocal students with a vocal performance emphasis, which consists of 50-55 minutes of music, will also require an extended research project on composers and operas/oratorios studied, as well as character studies (“singer as actor”), and detailed text studies resulting in a more extensive printed recital program including program notes as well as translations for songs in foreign languages.

RECREATION

REC 110 (0) Archways Wilderness Experience—A practical introduction to adventure camping as a transitional experience for incoming university freshmen.

REC 112 (3) Theories of Outdoor & Experiential Education—Study of theoretical principles and philosophical structures of the field of outdoor education.  The study of historical backgrounds and pedagogy of experiential education along with an introduction to theories of the related fields of place-based and adventure education are included.  Compares and contrasts these fields and their modern application.

REC 173 (3) Outdoor Living Skills—Emphasizes the skills and attitudes necessary for successfully living in and enjoying the outdoors in all seasons, ranging from day hikes to longer-term wilderness expeditions. Skills addressed will include outdoor equipment selection, staying warm and dry, shelter and campsite selection, safety awareness and wilderness travel using map and compass. Fee.

REC 228 (1) Practicum—Forty (40) hours of practical experience and observation in selected recreation agency settings.

REC 231 (3) Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation—Theoretical, philosophical and historical foundations of therapeutic recreation; role of the treatment and rehabilitation in settings and service models.  Professional development and current issues and problems in therapeutic recreation.

REC 252 (3) Principles of Church Recreation—Study of history, philosophy, programming, and administration of recreation in the church as it relates to the total ministry. Overview of leisure and its value in the church setting.

REC 270 (3) Wilderness First Responder (WFR)— Block Semester course Certification course taught by qualified outside instructors from one of three nationally recognized organizations (Stone Hearth Open Learning Opportunities, Wilderness Medical Associates, or Wilderness Medical Institute).  WFR is taught as an 8-day intensive early in the Fall Semester.  Students receive a 3-year certification. Pre-requisite: REC 112 and 173. Fee.

REC 271 (3) Adventure Skills I— Block Semester course Field course focused on land-based outdoor pursuits.  Gives technical knowledge necessary for the basic safe practice and leadership of backpacking, rock climbing, and caving.  Offers American Mountain Guides Association (AMGA) certified instruction in rock climbing. Pre-requisite: REC 112 and 173. Fee.

REC 272 (3) Adventure Skills II—Block Semester course - Field course focused on water-based outdoor pursuits.  Gives technical knowledge needed for basic safe practices, trip planning and leadership in flat water and moving water canoeing.  Also introduces students to white-water rafting and swift water rescue.  Requires a life-guarding certification. Pre-requisite: REC 112 and 173.. Fee.

REC 274 (3) Expedition Leadership & Planning—Block Semester course is designed as the theoretical component for the largely practical nature of the Adventure Leadership Block semester.  This course will guide the student learning in the field-based setting.  It provides insight into the concept of Leadership as a Process.  It challenges students to make tough decisions and understand WHY. Pre-requisite:  REC 112 and 173.

REC 275 (3) Outdoor Education and Stewardship—Block Semester course Field course involving a holistic approach to the study of the interrelationship of nature and humans.  Specific attitudes for caring about the environment and skill development using natural resources for leisure and educational pursuits are covered.  This course provides the theoretical anchor for the strongly experiential and field based learning of the block semester.  Concepts of creation care, leave no trace ethics, and environmental stewardship work in a place based educational model to create a powerful impetus for discussion and growth in students of the block semester. Pre-requisite: REC 112 and 173.

REC 312 (3) Outdoor Christian Leadership—Field course seeking to integrate Christian servant leadership concepts in the context of outdoor and adventure education.  Students will explore the Wilderness Education Association (WEA) principles of outdoor leadership, and begin to understand the nuances in leadership concepts associated with the ideas of leadership, facilitation, and guiding.  Rooted strongly in a Biblical understanding of a sound environmental ethic.  Pre-requisite: REC 112.

REC 342 (3) Recreation Programming—Study of programming content and process including assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of programs and services.

REC 362 (3) Challenge Course Facilitation—Study of technical and teaching skills necessary for beginning leadership in the challenge course adventure environment. The use of both permanent and mobile activities will be highlighted at the University challenge course facility.  Fee

REC 391 (1-3) Independent Study—A directed and supervised investigation of a selected problem/topic in the area of REC, mutually agreed upon by the student and professor.  Available to senior REC majors.  A student may take up to six (6) hours of independent studies.  Contract.

REC 393 (1-3) Seminar—The study of various issues/topics in the field of recreation.  Topics will be determined and announced for each semester a seminar is offered.  Fee.

REC 410 (2) Leader, Facilitator & Guide—is the Senior Capstone course.  It is designed to focus on philosophical concepts in the Outdoor and Adventure Education Fields.  It challenges students to apply the learning of their college career to their future lives.  It looks in-depth at critical pedagogy and transferrable leadership.

REC 422 (3) Plan, Design and Maintenance of Recreation, Athletic, and Park Facilities—Planning principles and procedures of athletic, recreation, and park areas.  Facilities, designing problems, details of structure and equipment, master planning methods, study of standards and trends of maintenance procedures.

REC 435 (3-6) Internship—Directed professional field experience in public and private recreation agencies. Pre-requisite:  Senior standing and application process must be completed and approved by department.  Contract.

SOCIOLOGY 

SOC 100 (3) Introduction to Sociology—An introduction to the perspectives, methods, concepts, and general findings of the sociologist. Includes discussion of historical and conceptual development of sociology and is a study of society with analysis of group life and other forces shaping human behavior. Serves as the basic course for students who intend to take additional courses in sociology or as a support course for other majors. 

SOC 101 (3) Introduction to Criminal Justice—(same as CRJ 101) A study of the general social conditions as they relate to understanding of crime, juvenile delinquency, and the corrections systems. An analysis of the incidence, causes, the court systems, methods of treatment, punishment, reform, and measures for prevention of crime and delinquency is included in this study.

SOC 112 (3) Introduction to Anthropology—An introduction to the comparative study of man and his culture. Treated are such themes as social organization (e.g. marriage, kinship, social stratification, etc.), social interaction (e.g. economic and political systems, religion, social control, etc.), and cultural change.

SOC 201 (3) Social Problems and Globalization in the 21st Century—Globalization is the process by which social realities increasingly extend beyond the confines of one’s own societal context and gives rise to new interdependencies, implications, and challenges on a global scale.  This course takes a sociological perspective on globalization and current social problems, in which attention is given to the 21st century “flat” world. 

SOC 230 (3) Leading Groups and Organizations— Transformational and effective leadership of groups and organizations requires a comprehensive understanding of social group dynamics such as: social interaction, social structures, change, roles, group/organizational development, and many other social factors.  Examines the sociological aspects of leadership from both the classical and contemporary perspectives, as well as from a biblical view of leadership.  Students will learn from the organizational process in "real time," as they launch an actual non-profit organization designed to surface the various social aspects of group leadership.  Fee.

SOC 252 (3) Juvenile Delinquency—A study of the problems of juvenile delinquency in America and across cultures;  including its nature and causes, the juvenile court system, methods of treatment, probation, detention, parole and prevention. 

SOC 260 (3) Social Justice and Community Development—The first half of the course will focus on an introduction to the symbolic, institutional and individual aspects of systemic oppression in local and global contexts and introduces students to theories of social justice and peace and strategies for social change.  The second half of the course will focus on community development and will examine community development beginning with its historical roots.  Policies that form the contemporary framework of the field will also be discussed, along with key theories such as social capital formation and asset development.  Successful church-based and other nonprofit community development models will be identified and explored.

SOC 311 (3) Sociology of Religion—Cross‑cultural analysis of religion as a social institution as it relates to culture, society, and the individual.  Pre-requisite: SOC 100 or 112.

SOC 312 (3) Issues in Intercultural Relations—A study of the cultural, political, economic, linguistic and social relationships between racial and ethnic groups in multicultural America, and within and between other nations.  Emphasis will be on understanding the origins, history and current state of racial and ethnic groups, the appreciation of other cultures, and on the Christian responses to conflict. 

SOC 322 (3) Rural Studies—A study of the rural culture, its role, socialization, interaction processes, and of their effect upon society.  Emphasis upon the Appalachian culture, its institutions, folkways, and social structure.  Fee.

SOC 323 (3) Urban Studies—A study of urban social, economic, and political growth and their effects upon mass society. Emphasis on patterns of urban growth, demographic and ecological processes, institutions, folkways, and dynamics of social class.  Fee.

SOC 331 (3) Introduction to Research Methods— (same as SW 331). Pre-requisite: Major in Social Work or Sociology or permission of the professor.

SOC 341 (3) Marriage and Family Studies—Development of the family as a social institution with emphasis on the contemporary American family its structure and interaction. Emphasis will also be placed on family organization, interaction, and communication in the parental and post-parental family. Courtship and marriage given special emphasis. Mate selection problems, adjustments in marriage, communication, human sexuality, finances and other important factors included. Pre-requisite: Junior standing or permission of the professor.

SOC 353 (3) International Social Issues—Examines international social problems. Social problems are defined as issues that affect many people and require collective action.  The course is designed to study social problems that affect the lives of inhabitants in several countries and require international action to bring their resolution.

SOC 372 (3) Sociological Theory—A study of the development of the discipline of sociology in terms of the major trends of sociological theory, past and present, including the theorists and the major theoretical problem areas of the discipline. Pre-requisite: Senior standing; Sociology, Social Sciences or Philosophy majors.

SOC 391 (1-3) Independent Study—Individual research and/or reading in particular fields of sociology. Pre-requisite: Permission of the professor.  Contract.

SOC 393 (1-3) Seminar—The study of various social issues with special emphasis on trends and issues of interest in the field.  Topics will be determined and announced each semester when the course is offered.

SOC 414 (3) Perspectives on Aging—Study of the social, psychological, biological and economic aspects of aging.  The content is interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and examines the positive contributions and special problems of the aging population.  Dying, death and grief are included in the exploration of end of life stages.

SOC 435 (2-5) Applied Sociology—To provide the opportunity for extensive work in a selected area of sociology, including special investigations, reports, and discussions. Internships can be designed to meet the student's specific interests.  Pre-requisite: Senior Sociology Major and/or permission of the professor.  Contract.

SOC 475 (2) Senior Seminar—Serves as the senior capstone course for sociology majors.  Provides integration of theory and practice.  Includes case studies, readings, a final integrative written paper and study of vocational and educational (graduate programs) pathways within sociology as well as the administration of a general knowledge standardized test in sociology for program assessment purposes.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS

SPE ___ (0-9) —Denotes an affiliate course completed with another institution as part of a study abroad or off campus program. See Undergraduate Special Programs for off campus program opportunities programs.

SPORT MANAGEMENT

SPM 220 (3) Introduction to Sport Management—Basic concepts and principles of sport management.  A survey of the careers, professional opportunities, and the structure and process of sport organizations.

SPM 310 (3) History & Evolution of Sports Industry—An historical study of the emergence of sport in America (late 19th century to the present). The relationship of American sports to the economic, social, cultural, religious and political history will be surveyed.  Other elements addressed include the forces of industrialization, urbanization, and immigration in early America.  Development of sports organizations, professional sports, mass media and their influence on the continued evolution of sports in modern day America will also be addressed.

SPM 330 (2) Sports Communication—Provides an introduction to such areas as interpersonal communications, small group communications, and mass communication as applied to sport organizations.  Other topics include electronic media, print media, media management, public speaking, and organizational communication.

SPM 340 (3) Sports Marketing—Fundamental areas of marketing and promotion are applied to the sport industry.  Emphasis on the principles, policies, and product of sport and successful fund raising.

SPM 380 (3) Introduction to Sports Analytics—The class will discuss the theory, development, and application of analytics in sports within the context of business and data management. Students will learn about the application of data analytics in sports for purposes of in-game strategy, player performance, team management, sports operations, and fantasy competitions. The class will consist of lectures, guest speakers from the sports industry and academia.

SPM 400 (3) Sports Law—Study of negligence liability, product liability, risk management procedures, legal status of sports organizations, and crowd control and security.  Also tort law, constitutional law, contracts, sport labor relations, and selected current issues.

SPM 410 (3) Sports Economics & Finance—Finance and economic marketing principles and theories applied to various sport organizations.  Budget development is studied as a method of control and organization.

SPM 435 (3) Internship—Directed professional field experience in Sport Management (240 hours expected). Pre-requisites: senior standing; application process; approval by the department.  Contract.

SPANISH

SPN 101 (3) Elementary Spanish I—An introduction to the study of Spanish with emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This course is designed for students who have never studied Spanish.

SPN 102 (3) Elementary Spanish II—Review and expansion of Spanish grammar, composition, and conversation.  Pre-requisite: SPN 101, two years of high school Spanish, or placement by examination.

SPN 201 (3) Intermediate Spanish—Continued development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish with a cross-cultural emphasis.  Pre-requisite:  SPN 102 or placement by examination.

SPN 291 (3) Advanced Intermediate Spanish—Designed to familiarize students with grammatical structures and syntax not mastered in elementary or intermediate Spanish.  Special attention will be placed on enhancing student skills in speaking, as well as the acquisition of cultural and literary knowledge.  Enables students to move smoothly into courses at the 300-level and beyond.  Pre-requisite: SPN 201, college placement examination, or permission of instructor

SPN 301 (3) Spanish Composition and Conversation—Intensive practice in both oral and written Spanish communication. Pre-requisite: SPN 291 or placement by examination.  

SPN 302 (3) Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition—Review and study of advanced Spanish grammar with intensive practice in writing Spanish prose. Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 303 (3) Introduction to Literature—Designed to familiarize students with the basic study of literary genres, critical reading skills, and basic literary analysis. Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 322 (3) Culture and Civilization of Spanish America—A survey of the cultural patterns of Spanish America from the pre‑Columbian period to the present time. Emphasis on historical and contemporary attitudes, cultural contributions, geography, and the role of Spanish America in the world today. Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 323 (3) Culture and Civilization of Spain—A survey of the cultural patterns of Spain from the Middle Ages to the present time. Emphasis on historical and contemporary attitudes, cultural contributions, geography, and the role of Spain in the world today. Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 331 (3) Spanish Literature I—A survey of the development of Spanish literature from its earliest manifestations through the Golden Age. Readings from the major authors. Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 332 (3) Spanish Literature II—A survey of Spanish literature of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Readings from the major authors. Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 341 (3) Spanish American Literature I—An introduction to the principal literary figures and movements of Spanish America from the 16th century to the early 1900's.  Readings from the major authors. Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 342 (3) Spanish American Literature II—An introduction to the principal literary figures and movements of Spanish America of the 19th and 20th centuries. Readings from the major authors. Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 371 (1) Spanish Listening Comprehension and Conversation Practice—Extensive practice viewing and discussing Spanish-language films.  Class meets two hours per week.  Credit/No Credit.  Does not count toward major or minor.  Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 372 (1) Spanish Listening Comprehension and Conversation Practice—A continuation of SPN 371.  Extensive practice viewing and discussing Spanish-language films.  Class meets two hours per week.  Credit/No Credit.  May be repeated for credit; may be counted only once toward major/minor. Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 391 (1-3) Independent Study—Independent study in a specialized field in consultation with supervising professor. Pre-requisites: Completion of at least one 300-level Spanish course and a 3.0 GPA in Spanish courses or permission of professor.  Contract.

SPN 393 (1-3) Seminar—A course designed for advanced students with the area of concentration to be determined by the staff. Credit for this course may be given more than once. Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 403 (3) Spanish Linguistics—Introduction to the study of linguistics.  Analysis of the phonetic and syntactic structure of the Spanish language. Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 410 (3) Spanish P-12 Teaching Methods—An introduction to the methods and materials used in teaching Spanish in elementary, middle and high schools. Pre-requisites: SPN 301, ED 200, 201, 230 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Course does not count toward the advanced Spanish hours required for the non-teaching major in Spanish.  Field component.

SPN 430 (3) Masterpieces of Spanish Literature—Study of selections from the masterpieces of the peninsular and Spanish-American canons.  May be repeated with different readings. Pre-requisite: SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

SPN 475 (1) Senior Seminar–—A course for all World Languages majors where students are asked to integrate and assess their skills with literature, language, and culture. Required of all World Languages majors.

SOCIAL WORK 

SW 100 (3) Introduction to Social Work—An introduction course designed to study the development of the social work profession and the role of the social worker in society. The values and attitudes of the social worker are explored. The course includes field trips in which the student has opportunity to observe various social service agencies and the role and responsibilities of the social worker within these settings. 

SW 211 (3) Social Service Systems—A conceptual framework is established that will provide the student with the knowledge base necessary to approach the various systems in social services.  The student will begin to utilize practical skills needed to serve client systems.  45 hours of volunteer service in an agency setting is required.  Pre-requisite or concurrent with: SW 100.

SW 251 (3) Human Behavior and the Social Environment I: Birth to Adolescence—Study of human growth and activity of the individual as a basis for understanding of oneself and the individuals of society.  Emphasis will be on change, and growth at different stages across the life span. An interdisciplinary approach examining biological, psychological, sociological, cultural, environmental, and spiritual aspects of human behavior will be used and applied to social work practice and understanding. Several theoretical approaches to explain human behavior and personality development are included.  Pre-requisite: SW 100.

SW 252 (3) Human Behavior in the Social Environment II: Adolescence through Adulthood and Aging—Study of human growth and activity of the individual as a basis for understanding oneself and the individuals of society.  An interdisciplinary approach examining biological, psychological, sociological, cultural, environmental, and spiritual aspects of human behavior will be used and applied to Social Work Practice and understanding.  Several significant theoretical approaches to explain human behavior and personality development are included, with focus on change and growth from adolescence through adulthood and aging.  Pre-requisite: SW 251.

SW 302 (3) Contemporary Issues in Social Work—A study of contemporary issues and trends in social work set within an historical context of the development of the social work field. Emphasis is placed on value and ethical dilemmas of practice and policy issues encountered by the social worker. Attention is given to problem and policy analysis to a wide range of activities and events that influence the quality of life for individuals, groups and society.  Pre-requisites: SW 100 and 211.  SW 251 also recommended.

SW 310 (3) Social Work Practice Theory I—Students will be expected to demonstrate an integration and utilization of the knowledge base developed in Social Service Systems. Interviewing and counseling techniques will be emphasized through video‑taped role‑playing during the first half of the course. The second half will focus on furthering skills in working with groups and families.  Pre-requisite: SW 211.

SW 311 (3) Social Services for Children and Families—A study of the various social services for children. This will include a historical perspective of child welfare and an awareness of societal problems which creates a need for social services to children and their families. Alternative placements outside the home, such as adoption, foster care, and institutionalization will be discussed as well as the supportive services offered to intact families and children. Pre-requisite: SW 100, 211, or permission of professor.

SW 331 (3) Introduction to Research Methods (same as SOC 331)—A course directed toward introducing the student to the basic research process elementary research design, data collection procedures; analysis and interpretation of data, and the preparation of a research proposal or report. Pre-requisite: Major in Social Work or Sociology or permission of the professor.

SW 340 (5) Practicum I—The student is placed for a minimum of 200 hours for the semester in an agency providing social services.  Requires a two-hour weekly seminar and individual, regular meetings with both field and academic instructors.  The practicum and practice seminar provide additional opportunity for the student to integrate classroom knowledge with practical experience.  The practicum is designed to give the student experience in working with individuals and/or groups in an agency setting.  Assigned readings, process recording, and other tools are used to enhance the field practicum experience.  Must be taken either fall or spring semester.  Pre-requisite or concurrently: SW 310. Junior or senior social work majors only.

SW 351 (3) Family Life Education—Examines the historical development, current problems, and emerging trends in Family Life Education, with special attention to family, church, school, and community. Emphasis is given to application of knowledge of spiritual and cultural concerns in topical presentations as part of students’ preparation for family life work and ministry.

SW 385 (3) Spiritual Formation and Social Work—This course is an exploratory effort to probe the connections between spiritual formation and social work.  It arises from the belief that an integrated conceptualization of Christian social work is a rich source of vision, compassion and ability; and is more efficacious than a compartmentalized model in which so-called “secular” social work is done by persons who also happen to be Christians.

SW 391 (1-3) Independent Study—Individual research and/or reading in particular fields of social work. Pre-requisite: Permission of the professor.  Contract.

SW 393 (1-3) Seminar—Seminars will be offered in specific subject matters as necessary to further prepare students in the social work field. These courses could be independent study or a regular class format. Course will be an elective unless stipulated for a specific option in social work.

SW 402 (3) Social Welfare Policies—To develop an understanding of the history, concepts and consequences of social welfare policies of national, state, local and agency organizations.  Analyzes the effects on the functioning of social workers at various agency and governmental levels.  Examines methods of achieving change in social policy as well as policy implementation.  Pre-requisites: SW 100, 211 or SOC major.

SW 410 (3) Social Work Practice Theory II—Designed to further the students' knowledge and competence as a skilled case worker and counselor. Designed to provide an overview of the divergent forms of counseling and therapy, the class will help students increase their knowledge and competence in the selection and use of various therapies. The course will emphasize personal dimensions as counselors.  Pre-requisites: SW 310, 340.

SW 422 (3) Social Work Administration—A study of administration and management principles in which students are introduced to organizing, community and organization needs assessment, goal setting, recruiting, selecting and organizing employees, securing and managing financial resources, grant writing, evaluating agency and program efforts.

SW 435 (2-3) Senior Social Work Practicum—Practicum in an area of special interest and opportunity to increase skills and knowledge.  Open only to seniors who have completed SW 340 and 440.  Details are to be coordinated carefully with the supervising instructor and field placement supervisor.  Contract.

SW 440 (8) Practicum II—The student is placed for a minimum of 320 hours for the semester in a social services agency.  Every effort will be made for a placement compatible with the student’s skills and interests.  In addition the student is to meet individually on a regular basis with both field and academic instructors.  The practicum and required practice seminar provide additional opportunity for the student to integrate classroom knowledge with practical experience. The practicum is designed to give the student experience with individuals, groups and organization in the agency setting.  Assigned readings, process recording and other tools are used to enhance the field practicum experience.  Pre-requisites:  SW 410 or concurrently.  Senior social work majors only.

SW 475 (2) Senior Seminar—Serves as the senior capstone course for social work program for the integration of theory, knowledge, skills, and values.  Case studies, readings, and final written paper will be used as learning and discussion tools.  Emphasis will be on ethical and value consideration as they apply to generalist social work practice.  Exit interviews and testing, and resume preparation are a part of the course.

THEOLOGY

TH 250 (3) Foundations of Christian Thought—This course provides a foundational knowledge of Christian thought, focusing on theology and its relation to the Christian life.  Students will study the basic doctrines and practices of historic Christianity, such as the being, attributes, and workings of the Triune God; the nature, fallenness, and redemption of human beings; the character and mission of the church; the disciplines and duties of personal faith; and the nature of Christian hope.  Attention is given to major formative events and key persons in the history of the church that have helped to shape Christian faith.  Students will not only learn what and why Christians believe what they do, but how these beliefs serve as a guide to life in the contemporary world.  Special emphasis is given to the essentials of Wesleyan thought.  Pre-requisites: NT 100; and OT 100; and PHL 200, or 231.

TH  290 (3)  Christian Worldview—The course will explore ways in which the student can develop a positive relationship with God as he/she explores the role of general revelation (the creation), special revelation (the Scriptures) and experiences God at work in the modern world.  [Same as ACH 300]

TH 310 (3) History of the Early Church—An introduction to the rise and development of the Christian church from its inception to the Council of Chalcedon in the fifth century.  Pre-requisite: TH 250.

TH 330 (3) The Theology of John Wesley—A study of John Wesley’s theology with particular attention given to his theology of salvation.  Special emphasis will be placed on his doctrine of Christian perfection. Pre-requisite: TH 250.

TH 340 (3) Pastoral Theology—Designed to acquaint students with the office and functions of the pastor. Classical Christian sources and concepts are explored in order to develop a theory of pastoral care that is consistent with Scripture and the Wesleyan tradition. Pre-requisite: TH 250.

TH 391 (1-3) Independent Study—A directed and supervised investigation of a selected research problem or issue in biblical studies, including the preparation of a scholarly paper. A student may not take more than four (4) hours of independent study. Pre-requisites: OT 100 and NT 100, 3.0 GPA and approval of instructor. Contract.

TH 393 (1-3) Seminar—Selected topics in Theology.

TH 400 (3) Historical Theology—A study of the historical development of theology within the Christian tradition.  Representative theologians and theological issues which have shaped the faith of the Christian church from post-biblical times to the modern period are investigated in the light of biblical, historical, and ethical concerns. Pre-requisite: TH 250.

TH 410 (3) Modern Theology—A study of 20th century theologians who have been decisive in responding to post-Enlightenment skepticism and its critique of revealed religion. Seminar class.  Pre-requisite: TH 250.

THEATRE & CINEMA PERFORMANCE 

THA 101 (1) Theatre/Cinema Practicum—Performance or crew assignment (40 clock hours) in theatre production or student film.  May be taken multiple times for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

THA 150 (3) Movement for the Actor—This course is designed to teach the student to incorporate the connection of the body and voice effectively into the art of stage acting. Primary emphasis will be placed on creating a powerful presence of the performer onstage. The student will learn a variety of physical and vocal warm-up techniques, a basic overview of selected stage movement techniques from theorists/practitioners in the discipline, and effective approaches for creating a union between voice and body in both abstract and realistic performances.

THA 151 (3) Acting I—A study of the basic principles of acting based on the Sanford Meisner technique.  An emphasis will be placed on Stanislavky's "Communion" of acting as it relates to connection, commitment, and communication.

THA 251 (3) Acting II—The sequential continuation of Acting I involving the organic gesture and emotional and physical imagination, further developing the actors’ impulses.  Pre-requisite:  THA 151

THA 262 (3) Approach to Design for Theatre and Cinema—Conceptualization and visualization of the elements involved in creative design for theatre, television, and film; strong emphasis on script analysis and formation of visual concepts.

THA 282 (4) Screenwriting Fundamentals—See MC 282.

THA 285 (4) New Works Seminar—This course is for the development of new works for stage or to explore new approaches to existing scripts.  The development process centers on text analysis, readings, blocking, and movement rehearsals.  Students must submit story ideas which will then be workshopped and developed with actors in a laboratory setting.  Includes lab for script development through rehearsal, readings, and blocking.

THA 321 (3) Auditions—Auditions is a seminar class that will prepare the student for professional and graduate school auditions in film and theatre.  The course will focus on all aspects of the audition process from resume creation and headshots to monologue selections and musical theatre pieces.  The culmination of all the elements of the class will be a final audition portfolio the students will develop throughout the course.  Additionally, students will participate in mock auditions with several of the professional theatres and film makers in this region of the country.  Fee.

THA 325 (3) Fundamentals of Directing for Theatre and Cinema—A study of the structural analysis of stage and screenplays, rehearsal problems and procedures, composition visualization, movement and rhythm on stage and screen.  Pre-requisite: THA 251 or instructor approval. Fee.

THA 331 (3) Religion and the Theatre—A study of the distinctions between and correlations among secular, religious, and "Christian" drama, with particular emphasis placed on religious-literary criticism.  Alternate years.

THA 351 (3) Acting III: Styles—will focus on the drama and performance styles of Ancient Greece, the Commedia dell‘arte of the Italian Renaissance, Restoration Comedy. Students will be introduced to the cultural milieu of these historical periods and the theatrical conventions in force at that time; and participate in a variety of exercises designed to immerse him/her in that particular period or style of theatre. Each student will participate in the performance of dramatic literature from each period. The goal of this course is for students to effectively apply basic MEISNER acting methods to literature from stylistically different periods, genres and authors while developing historically accurate and dramatically compelling characterizations.

THA 371 (3) Acting for the Camera—Study of performance techniques for camera and interpretation of comedy and drama for television, film, and emerging technologies.  Single and multiple camera productions.  Pre-requisites: THA 151 or THA 251.

THA 382 (3) World Theatre Forum—A survey of the historical background and significant cultural developments in World Theatre 1650-Present.

THA 391 (1-3) Directed Study—Work may be in technical design, acting, and directing.  A maximum of three hours applicable toward graduation.  Contract.

THA 393 (1-3) Seminar—Study of various issues in the fields of communication and theatre arts, with special emphasis on trends and issues of contemporary communications.  Topics will be determined and announced for each semester the course is offered.  Credit for this course may be given more than once.  On occasion.

THA 451 (3) Acting IV: Shakespeare—will prepare students to perform in Shakespeare’s plays. This course will provide a background overview of the Elizabethan period in addition to

various methods towards approaching the movement, voice, language and verse forms from the actor’s point of view. Extensive scene and monologue work.

THA 475 (1) Senior Seminar—Designed to help the Theatre & Cinema Performance major enter the processional theatre/film world and/or prepare for the student for graduate school. Topics include pursuing advanced degrees, developing a portfolio, and developing a strategy for future employment.

UNIVERSITY STUDIES 

UNV 110 (0.5-1) Strategies for College Success—Strategies for college success is offered for students in an approved support program. The course is designed to help the student:  (1) identify personal strengths and weaknesses; (2) create an individual college plan; (3) demonstrate competency in note-taking; (4) complete weekly management sheets; (5) demonstrate writing competency in journal writing.  This seminar provides a systematic structure to address the above concerns.  Students admitted to the approved support program must enroll every semester (either 0.5 semester hours or audit).  No more than one semester hour may be applied toward the total required semester hours for graduation.  Credit/No Credit. 

UNV 120 (1) First Year Experience Seminar—Prepares new students to engage in the college experience academically, spiritually, emotionally, socially, and physically.  Assists in exploring unique ways God has gifted them for life.  Addresses purpose and value of a Christian liberal arts education, campus resources, strategies for achieving academic excellence, goal-setting, time management, stress management, effective communication, problem solving, living in community, meaningful relationships, and cultural diversity.  Open to students with fewer than 30 semester hours completed.  Fee.

UNV 201 (1) APS Orientation— This course will provide an introduction to Asbury University and the Adult Professional Studies program.  The course will introduce students to University resources and services and program requirements and expectations.  Students will receive an orientation to the University’s technology tools and network systems and best practices for student success in technology-mediated learning environments. Credit/No-Credit.

UNV 205 (1) Academic Workshop I—The purpose of the course is to help facilitate academic success for students who are on academic probation.  Students in the Academic Workshop will acquire awareness, knowledge, skills, and understanding related to their personal academic success.  Methods used include discussion, readings, projects, assessments, debates, reflection, writing, media, and activities.  [freshmen and sophomores]  Repeatable. Fee.  

UNV 220 (1) Honors Forum—Facilitates meaningful dialogue and written reflection regarding the students' spiritual journey and the importance of integrating faith and learning.  Students will develop greater knowledge and understanding of self and the spiritual practices commonly used by Christians in the process of spiritual formation.  Pre-requisites:  By invitation of the President/Provost for incoming traditional freshmen with ACT score of 27 or higher.

UNV 300 (1) Facilitating Peer InstructionThe purpose of the course is to prepare and support tutors who are providing  peer assistance through the Tutoring Services program of the Center for Academic Excellence. Students in the Tutoring Workshop will acquire awareness, knowledge, skills, and understanding related to their role in students’ academic success.  Methods used include discussion, reflection, writing, media, and activities. Credit/No Credit. 

UNV 305 (1) Academic Workshop II—The purpose of the course is to facilitate academic success and completion of graduation requirements for upper division students who are on academic probation.  Students will review and apply previous knowledge and skills related to their personal academic success and progression towards graduation.  Methods used include discussion, assessments, reflection, writing, media, and activities.  [juniors and seniors]  Repeatable. Fee.

UNV 320 (3) The Peer Instructor: Teaching in Higher Education —Theory to Practice—Examines student development, learning, and leadership theories, models, and practices for students success in the college classroom.  Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and skills as Peer Educators for UNV 120.  By permission of instructor.

UNV 393 (1) Honors Seminar—Open to seniors who have a cumulative standing of 3.50 and a minimum of 48 hours earned at Asbury University.  Participation by invitation of the Provost.  May not be repeated.  Credit/No Credit.

VOCAL MUSIC 

[VOC 200-level Proficiency (0)—For those degree programs with this requirement, it must be successfully completed by the end of the sophomore year or the student must enroll in the following sequence of courses until the proficiency is completed: VOC 100 plus three semesters of VOC 101 or VOC 102.  Students may fulfill the VOC 200-level proficiency by (1) completion of VOC 100 plus an additional three semesters of private voice lessons, or (2) by jury examination, so the examination may be attempted in any semester.  The form indicating the criteria for this proficiency exam is found on the Music Department website under the section entitled, “Forms for Current Students”.]

VOC 100 (1) Voice Fundamentals for Singers—Vocal fundamentals for singers is a Pre-requisite to voice lessons for those students who have not completed a successful audition for either a music major, minor, or a Music Performance Scholarship. (Other students with a strong background in vocal training may also audition to exempt the Pre-requisite class.)  Emphasis on understanding the vocal instrument and the vocabulary of vocal study, as well as the process of developing singing skill through regular practice of both vocal training exercises and vocal literature in the classic tradition.  Maximum class size will be 12 students. Fee.

VOC 101 (1) Voice Lessons/Non-majors—half hour elective voice lesson for students who are neither voice majors nor minors – no accompanist provided.  Practice hour requirement is three hours weekly; musical literature requirement, beginning with the second semester, is a minimum of three memorized songs; performance requirement, beginning with the second semester, is a studio performance or jury exam, at the teacher’s discretion.  Pre-requisite: VOC 100 or VOC 104, or successful audition; May be repeated.  Fee.

VOC 102 (2) Voice Lessons/Non-majors—one hour elective voice lesson for students who are neither voice majors nor minors – no accompanist provided.  Practice hour requirement is four-and-one-half hours weekly; musical literature requirement, beginning with the second semester of elective study, is a minimum of four memorized songs; performance requirement, beginning with the second semester, is a studio performance or jury exam, at the teacher’s discretion.  Pre-requisite: VOC 100 or VOC 104, or successful audition. May be repeated.  Double lesson fee.

VOC 104 (2) Voice for Theatre and Worship—Vocal fundamentals for those students with an interest in learning how to use the singing voice in non-classical genres.  Primary topics would include (1) healthy singing and speaking for drama/musical theatre, (2) singing with the use of a microphone, (3) healthy singing in contemporary styles (Broadway, Pop, and other contemporary styles), (4) understanding of appropriate styles for various venues and how they compare, (5) basic concepts of breath, phonation, resonance, articulation, and communication. Either this class, VOC 100, or an audition is required for all students who wish to enter the collegiate voice lesson program.   Fee.

VOC 105 (1) Diction for Singers I—Students learn to use the International Phonetic Alphabet in English, Italian and Latin.  Recommended for all students preparing classical music in private voice lessons.

VOC 106 (1) Diction for Singers II—This course is a continuation of VOC 105, using the International Phonetic Alphabet for training singers who perform German and French songs.  Pre-requisite: VOC 105 or the equivalent. 

VOC 111 (1) Voice Lessons for THA—half hour voice lesson designed for Theatre & Cinema Performance majors who are fulfilling requirements for the Musical Theatre Emphasis, but open to non-majors – ½ hour accompanist provided.  Practice hour requirement is three hours weekly; musical literature requirement, beginning with the second semester of elective study is a minimum of three memorized songs; performance requirement, beginning with the second semester, is a studio performance or jury exam, at the teacher’s discretion.  Pre-requisite: VOC 100 or VOC 104, or successful audition.  May be repeated.  Lesson fee and accompanist fee.

VOC 112 (2) Voice Lessons for THA—one hour voice lesson designed for Theatre & Cinema Performance majors who are fulfilling requirements for the Musical Theatre Emphasis, but open to non-majors – ½ hour accompanist provided.  Practice hour requirement is four-and-one-half hours weekly; musical literature requirement, beginning with the second semester of elective study, is a minimum of four memorized songs; performance requirement, beginning with the second semester, is a studio performance or jury exam, at the teacher’s discretion.  Pre-requisite: VOC 100 or VOC 104, or successful audition.  May be repeated.  Double lesson fee and single accompanist fee.

VOC 201 (1) Voice Lessons/Non-majors—half  hour elective voice lesson for non-music majors who have been pre-approved to perform a public, elective recital (RCT 280) – ½ hour accompanist provided.  Practice hour requirement is four hours weekly; musical literature requirement is linked to the literature requirements specified for RCT 280; performance requirement is a jury exam (if not the semester of the recital) or RCT 280.  Lesson fee and accompanist fee.

VOC 202 (2) Voice Lessons/Non-majors—one hour elective voice lesson for non-music majors who have been pre-approved to perform a public, elective recital (RCT 280) – ½ hour accompanist provided.  Practice hour requirement is five hours weekly; musical literature requirement is linked to the literature requirements specified for RCT 280; performance requirement is a jury exam (if not the semester of the recital) or RCT 280.  Double lesson fee and single accompanist fee.

VOC 211 (1) Voice Lessons/Majors & Minors—half  hour voice lesson for underclassmen vocal majors & all vocal minors – ½ hour accompanist provided.  Practice hour requirement is four hours weekly; musical literature requirement, beginning with the second semester, is four memorized songs; performance requirement is an end-of-semester jury exam (which may be ungraded for first semester students, at the teacher’s discretion) or RCT 280.  Pre-requisite: first semester students must either have completed or be simultaneously enrolled in VOC 100 and must have successfully auditioned for the major or minor prior to the beginning of the semester.  Lesson fee and accompanist fee.

VOC 212 (2) Voice Lessons/Majors & Minors—one hour voice lesson for underclassmen vocal majors & all vocal minors – ½ hour accompanist provided.  Practice hour requirement is five hours weekly; musical literature requirement, beginning with the second semester, is five memorized songs; performance requirement is an end-of-semester jury exam (which may be ungraded for first semester students, at the teacher’s discretion) or RCT 280.  Pre-requisite: first semester students must either have completed or be simultaneously enrolled in VOC 100 and must have successfully auditioned for the major or minor prior to the beginning of the semester.  Double lesson fee and single accompanist fee.

VOC 300 (1-2) Opera Workshop—Training with chamber operas, light operas or operettas, and/or with opera scenes.  Students accept responsibilities for learning a role or roles, assisting with aspects of technical execution, and/or performing the opera or scenes assigned.  Credit is available both fall or spring term for annual productions, but two credits may only be granted for those who successfully audition for major roles. By audition only. Credit/No credit.

VOC 301 (1-2) Musical Theatre Ensemble—An auditioned ensemble of approximately 10-12 students who will prepare solo items as well as ensemble scenes from the Musical Theatre Repertory.  Students study vocal technique, acting, movement, diction, stage persona, etc., in preparing and presenting a “gala” or “showcase”-type performance.  By audition only. Credit/No credit.

VOC 411 (1) Voice Lessons/Upper-class Majors—half  hour voice lesson for students whose primary instrument is voice but who do not choose a vocal performance emphasis – ½ hour accompanist provided.  Practice hour requirement is five hours weekly; musical literature requirement is five memorized songs; performance requirement is an end-of-semester jury exam or completion of appropriate RCT course requirements.  Pre-requisite: successful completion of Vocal Advancement, for which forms are available in the “Current Student Forms” section of the Music Department’s website.  Lesson fee and accompanist fee.

VOC 412 (2) Voice Lessons/Upper-class Majors—one hour hour voice lesson for students whose primary instrument is voice but who do not choose a vocal performance emphasis – ½ hour accompanist provided.  Practice hour requirement is six hours weekly; musical literature requirement is six memorized songs; performance requirement is an end-of-semester jury exam or completion of appropriate RCT course requirements.  Pre-requisite: successful completion of Vocal Advancement, for which forms are available in the “Current Student Forms” section of the Music Department’s website.  Double lesson fee and single accompanist fee.

VOC 422 (2) Voice Lessons/Upper-class Performance Emphasis—one hour voice lesson for upperclassmen with a vocal performance emphasis – 1 hour accompanist provided.  Practice hour requirement is six hours weekly; musical literature requirement is six memorized songs; performance requirement is an end-of-semester jury exam or completion of appropriate RCT course requirements.  Pre-requisites: (1) successful completion of Vocal Advancement Exam, and (2) approval of the music faculty for the Performance Emphasis.  Forms for each of these Pre-requisites are available in the “Current Student Forms” section of the Music Department’s website.  Double lesson fee and double accompanist fee.

VOC 461, 462 (1 each) Vocal Pedagogy I and II—Vocal Pedagogy I and II comprise a 2-semester course sequence that meets for one session per week each semester.  The first semester is designed with a resource-and-information-gathering focus in the areas of vocal physiology, resources, and literature.  The second semester focuses primarily on student teaching, with each student engaging in private voice teaching as well as observation of professional private instruction.  Students gather and compile information through observation, evaluation, experience, resource-gathering, and class discussion and interaction.

WORSHIP ARTS

WA 101 (2) Introduction to Worship Arts—An introductory examination of the content, construct, and context of the worship arts in the contemporary church. Special attention is given to music.

WA 121 (3) Contemporary Music Theory I—Explores chord structure, melody, and form in contemporary music, and emphasizes ear training in contemporary idioms.  Examines arranging songs for a worship band from both a formal and instrumentation standpoint.  Pre-requisites:  MTH 111, MTH 121. Fall

WA 151 (1) Worship Arts Technology—Further examines the use of software and technology commonly used in contemporary music.  Students gain further skills in the use of music notation software and skills in sequencing, loops, and keyboards. Pre-requisites:  MTH 111, MTH 121, MUS 150.

WA 211 (1) Worship Band Ensemble—Required for students in the Worship Arts major (music emphasis).  Members practice together and use their music in multiple ministry situations throughout the semester, especially chapel services.  By audition only. Every semester.

WA 221 (2) Introduction to Worship Band—Students gain an elementary competency in guitar, bass, drums, keyboard, and vocals.  Pre-requisites:  MTH 111, MTH 121, WA 121.

WA 293 (1-3) Worship Arts Seminar—A study of various topics and issues in worship arts, with particular attention to emerging trends. May be repeated for credit.

WA 300 (2) Worship Arts Leadership—An overview of many of the facets of worship arts leadership, especially regarding their spiritual implications.  The many and varied roles and relationships of the worship leader are explored. Special emphasis is placed on the relationship between the worship leader and the pastor.  Also considered are areas of personnel management and the relationships between the worship leader and other staff members, singers/instrumentalists, and the congregation. Pre-requisites: CM 100, CM 201.

WA 322 (3) Contemporary Music Theory II—Further explores chord structure, melody, and form in contemporary music; ear training in contemporary idioms; arranging songs for a worship band from both a formal and instrumentation standpoint; and music technology. Students are required to synthesize all this into writing their own songs. The culmination of the course is the writing and performing of students’ songs.  Pre-requisites:  MTH 111, MTH 121, WA 121, WA 151, WA 221.

WA 435 (3) Internship—Students are placed with local worship pastors in one semester, intensive, real-life mentoring relationships where they gain experience and insight into the fulltime ministry of being a worship arts director.  Capstone experience.   Contract.

WA 475 (1) Senior Seminar—A cumulative overview of the students’ work at Asbury and a preparation for entrance

into the professional world. Topics include philosophy of worship, practical aspects of working in a church, resume refinement, and internship and job searching.

YOUTH MINISTRY 

YM 235 (1) YM Practicum—Opportunity for observation and practical experience in ministry settings as a means to clarify direction and call to ministry through networking with professionals serving in a youth ministry role. Periodic class sessions provide opportunity for interaction with peers and reflection on ministry practices.  Majors and minors only.  May be repeated once for credit.  Every semester.

YM 350 (3) Youth Ministry (Same as EM 350)

YM 360 (2) Youth and Culture—A course exploring characteristics and trends in youth culture. Emphasis is placed on equipping future youth ministry leaders to assess and address these issues from a biblical and culturally-sensitive perspective in their ministry. Students will design and implement a research project. Pre-requisite: EM/YM 350 or department permission.  Even years, Spring.

YM 370 (2) Pastoral Care of Youth—A study of various problems that affect adolescents and processes for spiritually-centered assistance and intervention. Basic pastoral care/counseling principles and strategies for a ministry context will be explored, including confidentiality, limitations, referral, and ethics. Pre-requisite: EM/YM 350 or department permission.  Odd years, Spring.

YM 380 (2)  Special Topics in Youth Ministry—A seminar-style consideration of significant and emerging issues in youth ministry for advanced youth ministry students and other students interested in lay or parachurch ministry with youth.  A primary focus of the course is participation in a national conference for youth ministry practitioners. Fee. Fall.

YM 391 (1-3) Independent Study—A directed and supervised investigation of a selected research problem or issue in youth ministry. The preparation of a scholarly paper is included. Pre-requisites:  EM 280, Seniors only, departmental permission required.  May not be repeated for credit.  Contract.

YM 393 (1-3) Seminar—The study of various issues and fields of youth ministry, with special emphasis on trends and issues of contemporary ministry.  Topics will be determined and announced for each semester the seminar is offered.  Pre-requisites: EM/YM 350. (Not more than 4 hours of seminar credit may count towards major or minor.  Admission by departmental permission only.)

YM 435 (3) Internship—The application of ministry principles in an actual ministry setting with adolescents, supervised by department-approved ministry personnel.  Pre-requisites: EM/YM 350 and CM 380; JR/SR status; major/minor only.  Credit/No credit. Contract.

 

GRADUATE COURSE CATALOG

Listed alphabetically by prefix code

ATS COURSES

ATS ___—denotes affiliate course taken by agreement through Asbury Theological Seminary.  The Asbury University Master of Social Work program has a cooperative agreement whereby MSW students may take courses at Asbury Theological Seminary.

BIOLOGY EDUCATION

BLG 510 (3) Advanced Topics in Biology—Students will work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in the biology department to select topic(s) that will best supplement and enhance the student's educational experience in the biological sciences.  The student will complete readings including those assigned from primary research articles, and submit for evaluation reports and research papers on the selected topics.  Laboratory work may be included in the study of a particular topic.  Oral presentations may also be required.

BLG 610 (3) Advanced Independent Research—Students will work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in the biology department to select, design and carry to completion an independent scientific research project of a biological nature.  The project will generally relate to the area of biological education. A research paper of the quality to be presented in a professional scientific meeting at the state or national level must be written upon completion of the research project. Pre-requisite: BLG 510.

CHEMISTRY EDUCATION

CHG 510 (3) Advanced Topics in Chemistry—Students will work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in the chemistry department to select topic(s) that will best supplement and enhance the student's educational experience in the chemical sciences.  The student will complete readings including those assigned from primary research articles, and submit for evaluation reports and research papers on the selected topics. Laboratory work may be included in the study of a particular topic. Oral presentations may also be required.

CHG 610 (3) Advanced Independent Research—Students will work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in the chemistry department to select, design and carry to completion an independent scientific research project of a chemical nature. The project will generally relate to the area of chemical education.  A research paper of the quality to be presented in a professional scientific meeting at the state or national level must be written upon completion of the research project. Pre-requisite: CHG 510. 

DIGITAL STORYTELLING

DSG 582 (3) Advanced Screenwriting—A writing course in film and television.  Original screenplays will be developed.  Includes lab for script development and discussion of three act structure and story development.

DSG 621 (3) Master Storytellers Seminar —This online course will focus on developing analyses and critiques of master filmmakers.  It will require students to review a selected collection of films from some of the most talented directors in cinematic history and to post critiques/analysis for each film in an online forum each week.  Learning outcomes will reflect an ability to develop lucid insights into the director’s storytelling techniques, visual conventions and interpret messages/agendas with a Biblical worldview. Classic films would be reviewed.

DSG 625 (3) Deconstructing the Documentary:  Myths, Propaganda, & the Truth—This course will review the history and agendas of documentaries from Robert Flaherty, to Leni Riefenstahl, to Michael Moore to Ken Burns to Morgan Spurlock to Dana Brown.  Students will read relevant articles, books and review a planned succession of documentary films and series.  They will post weekly essays reflecting a thoughtful analysis of the meaning and agendas of the various documentaries reviewed.  Learning outcomes will include research strategies, critical analysis and worldview insight. Pre-requisite: DSG 621.

DSG 630 (3) Viral Marketing, Methods, Messages and Media—This online course will require students to select and analyze viral marketing’s social impact on politics, consumer products and media campaigns.  Students will research and critique campaigns in the first half of the class. Students will create a viral marketing campaign in the second half of the course for an actual event, product or campaign.

DSG 641 (1) Research Methods & Tools in Communication—Taught by the university librarians, this course introduces graduate students to the resources available for research in the communication-related fields. The course will include application assignments.

DSG 642 (3) Media Ethics in an Age of Relativity, Agendas and Advocacy —Students will read, review, and analyze media studies to develop discussion essays for an online multimedia publication that critiques how television, web, radio, music seek to impact culture in light of a Biblical worldview. 

DSG 692 (3) Directed Study—A supervised, directed study of a selected topic in cinema or digital storytelling.   May be taken more than once.  [Contract required]   Fee – when using AU equipment.

DSG 710 (3) Apprenticeship Program (generally off-campus)—Graduate students will serve in an apprenticeship role directly under a qualified experienced industry professional (resume must be presented to faculty) in the production of a movie, advanced web site, magazine or the production of a music CD.  This program requires a minimum of 160 hours under the guidance of a professor and/or qualified industry professional. Faculty strongly recommend a secular apprenticeship. Must be approved by faculty advisor. [Contract required]

DSG 740/741 (3) Master’s Thesis/Creative Project I and II—(Blended online/face-to-face) Although much of this can be handled remotely, a portion of this class will require a at least one visit to the campus for consultation with the supervising professor.  This is a guided individualized mentoring experience in which the student is assisted through their thesis or creative project under the direction of a faculty member. Projects may include a video/film project that is 20-30 minutes in length, a viral campaign, audio project. This may take more than one semester for completion. Thesis/project must be approved by the faculty advisor. Final thesis must be presented to the faculty and creative project must include a public presentation. [Contract required]   Fee – based on use of AU equipment.

EDUCATION

EDG 500 (2) Orientation and Clinical Component I—This course, in conjunction with a 50-hours field and clinical experience, provides prospective teacher education candidates a variety of concepts, skills and performances considered essential to the successful completion of a graduate degree at Asbury University.  Experiences will include introduction to the conceptual framework, the performance assessment system, the digital course management system, writing, and library skills.  The field/clinical experience portion is the first integrated clinical experience designed to provide authentic exposure to public school classrooms.  There will be an intentional focus on observation, inquiry and project-based learning though a work sample model so that students will be prepared to successfully facilitate the learning of P-12 diverse students.  Clinicals: Course embedded– 15 hours and School-Embedded 35 hours.  Fee.

EDG 501 (1) Literacy Skills for Advanced Degrees—The intent of this course is to provide candidates with enhanced reading and writing skills to support their graduate work.  Students will be assigned as needed or if admitted on probationary status. This credit does not count toward a degree.  May be taken a maximum of three times. Fee. 

EDG 505 (3) Learning Theories and Performance Assessment—Designed to examine classical learning theories of the motivation and cognitive development of human behavior. Future teachers will be trained to interpret the results of standardized achievement tests, and to create performance-based assessment items, and develop teacher-made tests which take into account a student's individual approaches to learning. Clinicals: Course embedded – 5 hours.  Fee.

EDG 510 (3) Culture, Design and Management for Secondary Schools—A study of theory, culture, methodology, and environment.  Classroom culture, climate, daily organization, conferencing skills, managing the work load, teaching style, as well as teacher/student and teacher/parent relationships will be explored.  Emphasis will be given to the moral dimension of teaching and classroom interaction. Clinicals: Course embedded– 5 hours and School-Embedded 5 hours.  Fee.

EDG 525 (3) Middle School Curriculum and Methodologies—Focuses on curriculum concepts and teaching strategies for students in the middle grades. Attention will be given to the philosophy and educational structure appropriate for the middle grades. Methods and materials related to particular academic emphases will be provided. Time is given to unit and lesson plans. Clinicals: Course embedded– 5 hours and School-Embedded 5 hours.  Fee.

EDG 585 (3) Literacy for the Secondary School—Theories, methods, and techniques that address the literacy needs of secondary students in all disciplines will be included in this course. An overview of the various aspects of the reading process and emphasis on the specialized demands of reading and writing, including portfolio development, in the content areas is a major focus. Clinicals: Course embedded– 5 hours and School-Embedded 5 hours.  Fee.

EDG 591 (1-3) Directed Study—Opportunity for students to do additional study in an area of need or interest.  Contract.  Fee.

EDG 593 (1-3) Graduate Seminar—Seminars, special cross-cultural and diverse graduate experiences as well as extended field experiences supervised by faculty, with appropriate reading and assessment.  Fee.

EDG 595 (1-3) Graduate Extended Field Experience—Extends the graduate field experiences currently integrated within each of the Graduate Education majors.  It will (a) assist the student to connect theory and practice; (b) provide a sense of flow and schedule of a typical school day; (c) enable in-depth and extended interaction with classroom teachers and students, and (d) help the candidates apply content from graduate course work in lesson planning and teaching.  Candidates are involved in planning for and implementing lessons for both small and whole group instruction.  This course also offers expanded opportunities for candidates who desire additional experiences in urban settings or with students who have diverse learning needs.  Fee.

EDG 601 (2) Graduate Education Clinical Component II—This is the second integrated clinical course that provides prospective teacher education candidates with analytical experiences across various disciplines through inquiry-based instruction with P-12 students.  Candidates will spend 150 clinical/field hours in a variety of authentic settings where they will build upon experiences in EDG 500.  Performance work sample requirements will include design, diagnosis, analysis, and prescribing to enhance student success.  This component is also designed to further facilitate students’ ability to work in schools with a high population of P-12 diverse students.  Supervision and mentoring with be provided for each educator.  Clinicals: School – embedded hours – 150.  Pre-requisites:  EDG 500 or SEG 500.  Pre-requisites for ESLG students:  EDG 500, 618.  Fee.

EDG 605 (3) Foundations of Learning—The purpose of this course is to show how philosophical ideas about education developed over time, with due regard to historical influences and settings and with an emphasis on how these ideas continue to have relevance for education and life.  Theories of learning, cultural influences, and environmental factors will be explored within varying educational contexts. Clinicals: Course embedded– 5 hours and School-Embedded 2 hours.  Fee.

EDG 628 (2) Interventions for Differentiation—The course focus is the teacher’s role in creating collaborative structures that provide interventions to ensure the learning for each child.   Through two modules of study that impact student learning and classroom management, candidates analyze Response to Intervention (RTI) for students as well as analyze and assess effective collaboration models for  English Learners (EL) and students with exceptionalities.  To ensure the needs to all students can be met in the regular education classrooms, students will acquire an understanding of language acquisition theories and research based practices for English Learners.  Students will design an Intervention for Differentiation Plan of Action.  Module 1:  Response to Intervention (RTI) for Students; Module 2:  Building Collaborative Models of Instruction for English learners and Students with Exceptionalities Clinicals: Course embedded– 5 hours and School-Embedded 5 hours.  Fee.

EDG 630 (3) Secondary Methods and Strategies—The study of methods, materials and strategies used in current education and the development of skills in relating these to the teaching-learning process is the focus of this course.  Aims and objectives for teaching a specific discipline are included as well as curriculum, unit and lesson planning, assessment, and use of technology. Strategies for the 21st Century learner will be integrated throughout this course.  Clinicals: Course embedded– 5 hours and School-Embedded 5 hours.  Pre-requisite: EDG 585.  Fee.

EDG 636 (2) Instructional Technologies—An array of instructional technologies will be included to facilitate the education of all students.  Technological experiences will include:  instructional software integration, presentation software, interactive multimedia applications, authoring software web-based instructional technology, and video editing.  Productivity software and assistive devices specific to the field of special education will be explored.  Laboratory experiences Clinicals: Course embedded– 5 hours.  Fee.

EDG 680 (3) Research Development—The three components of assessment theory, research design and learning to analyze data are addressed, resulting in leadership guided by decision-oriented educational research.  Clinicals: Course embedded– 5 hours and School-Embedded 15 hours.  Pre-requisite for students in Special Education program: SEG 670; Pre-requisite for students in Literacy program: LTY 642. Fee.

EDG 681 (1) Research Project—The research proposal developed in EDG 680 is implemented by using the research design to collect data, analyze and interpret the data, and present the results of the research in a written format and by oral presentation.  Credit is received when project is completed and presented.  Credit/no credit. Clinicals: School-Embedded 25 hours.  Fee.

EDG 700 (2) Graduate Education Clinical Component III (For MAT with Option 6 Alternative Certification Candidates)—This third integrated clinical course provides prospective Option 6 Alternative Certification route teacher candidates with continued analytical experiences across various disciplines through inquiry-based instruction with P-12 students.  Candidates will spend 150 clinical/field hours in a variety of authentic settings where they will build upon experiences in EDG 500 and 601.  Performance work sample requirements will include design, diagnosis, robust data analysis, and prescribing to enhance student success.  This component is also designed to further facilitate students’ ability to work in schools with a high population of P-12 diverse students.  Supervision and mentoring will be provided for each educator. Clinicals: School-embedded = 150 hours.  Pre-requisites:  EDG 601 or SEG 601.   Fee.

EDG 701 and 702 (2-6) Graduate Education Clinical Component III (For MAT  Candidates Without Option 6 )—This third integrated clinical course provides prospective teacher education candidates with continued analytical experiences across various disciplines through inquiry-based instruction with P-12 students.  For those candidates in the MAT program and who are not currently employed as a teacher by a school district, a teaching experience of 70 days will be required in a variety of authentic settings where they will build upon experiences in EDG 500 and 601.  Performance work sample requirements will include design, diagnosis, robust data analysis, and prescribing to enhance student success.  This component is also designed to further facilitate students’ ability to work in schools with a high population of P-12 diverse students.  Supervision and mentoring will be provided for each educator. If split placement is required register for 701 and 702. Pre-requisites: EDG 601 or SEG 601.  Fee.

EDG 793 (1-3) Leadership Seminar—Leadership seminars, cross-cultural and diverse leadership experiences and special extended field experiences supervised by faculty, with appropriate reading and assessment.  Fee.

EDG 795 (1-3) Extended Leadership Field Experience—This course extends the field experiences currently integrated within each of the graduate leadership majors.  It will (a) assist the candidate to connect theory and practice; (b) provide a sense of flow and schedule for leadership in a typical school day; (c) enable in-depth and extended interaction with school administrators, classroom teachers, students, and parents, and (d) help the leadership candidate apply content from leadership courses.   Candidates are involved in planning for and implementing leadership activities for both small and large groups.  This course also offers expanded opportunities for candidates who desire additional experiences in urban settings or with students who have diverse learning needs.  Fee.

EDUCATION MSD

MODERATE/SEVERE DISABILITY EDUCATION AFFILIATE COURSES IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY – the following affiliate courses are available at the University of Kentucky, and, through articulation agreement, can be taken by approved Asbury University students, graduate and undergraduate, to enhance an LBD area certification or endorsement. 

[See the School of Education for details about program.]

EDS 530 (3) Characteristics of Persons with Moderate and Severe Disabilities—A critical examination of the pertinent research in reference to the educational, physical, and psychological nature and needs of the children labeled educable and trainable mentally retarded, including interpretation of psychological tests.  Evaluation of the physical, social, emotional, and mental characteristics of persons with retardation, to assist the classroom teacher to recognize the social potential of each child to the degree that the child with mental disabilities may become less of a burden to himself and society.

EDS 546 (3) Transdisciplinary Services for Students with Disabilities—Students in this course will identify and discuss critical philosophical issues related to teaching students with disabilities.  Discussion will focus on pertinent information related to planning for this population of students in the areas of communication, physical, health, sensory input and vitality.  This information will be used to plan for a student with disabilities including a transdisciplinary assessment, a person-centered plan, and an activity-based instructional program.

EDS 548 (3) Curriculum Design for Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities—Educational and adaptive behavior assessment and curriculum prescription for individuals exhibiting moderate intellectual and developmental disabilities. The course participant will acquire skills in the use of current formal and informal educational and adaptive behavior assessment procedures for use in prescribing curriculum, instructional, behavioral intervention with individuals exhibiting moderate intellectual and developmental disabilities. Specific attention will be focused on procedures for using assessment data and curriculum prescription that enhances the full inclusion of school age individuals with disabilities with their non-disabled peers.

EDS 549 (4) Methods for Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities—The course participant will serve as a teacher aide in a classroom or other service delivery setting under the supervision of a person certified in the moderate/severe disability area.  Course requirements include application of direct observation, formal and informal assessment of pupil performance, clinical writing and instructional and behavioral intervention in both individualized and small group settings.  Practicum settings used by course participants will model best practices with regard to instruction, behavior management and the full inclusion of persons with moderate intellectual and developmental disabilities with their non-disabled peers.

ENGLISH EDUCATION

ELG 510 (3) Advanced Topics in English—Students work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in the English Department to select topic(s) that will best supplement and enhance the student’s educational experience in English studies.  The student will complete readings including those assigned from primary research articles, and submit for evaluation reports and research papers on the selected topics.  Oral presentations may also be required.

ELG 610 (3) Advanced Independent Research—Students work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in the English Department to select, design and carry to completion an independent research project related to studies in English. The project will generally relate to the area of English education.  A research paper of the quality to be presented in a professional language or literature meeting at the state or national level must be written upon completion of the research project.

EDUCATION SOCIAL WORK

ESW____—denotes a MSW program utilizing a course from the graduate education program.

ESW 520 (3) Exceptional Learner in the General Education Classroom— (ED 320/SEG 520)— An introduction to the field of special education dealing with the learning needs of exceptional children - those who are gifted and those who have intellectual, emotional, physical, or sensory disabilities. Course emphasis is on principles and procedures for adapting educational programs to accommodate the needs of these children in the general education classrooms. School-embedded clinical experience required. Clinicals: Course embedded– 5 hours and School-Embedded 10 hours.  Fee.

ESW 630 (3) Behavioral Intervention of Students with Learning and Behavior Disabilities—(SEG 630) —This course offers principles and techniques for managing the behavior of children and youth with disabilities.  Preventive, supportive, and corrective techniques are included.  The focus of the course will be on applied behavior analysis and the designing and implementing of behavioral management plans. Consultation techniques for indirect service to students will be included.  (Field experience required). Clinicals: School embedded: 10 hours; Course embedded: 5 hours. Pre-requisite:  SEG 520 or equivalent.  Fee.

ESW 632 (3) Collaboration and Advocacy for Special Populations—(SEG 632)—This course focuses on collaborative models and appropriate techniques for cooperative working relationships in the school setting.  Pertinent legislation and issues of advocacy for the student, parent, and teacher will be explored and applied to current principles for the development of educational programming for students with disabilities. Clinicals:  Course embedded: 5 hours. Pre-requisite:  SEG 520 or equivalent.  Fee.

ESW 638 (3) Introduction to Students with Learning and Behavior Disabilities—(SEG 638)—The learning, behavioral, and emotional problems of children and youth are explored in the context of theory, etiology, assessment, and practice.  Issues of educational programming and community agency support are considered.  (Field experience required) Clinicals: School embedded: 5 hours; Course embedded: 5 hours. Pre-requisite:  SEG 520 or equivalent.   Fee.

FRENCH EDUCATION   

FRG 510 (3) Advanced Topics in French—Each student will work under the direct supervision of a member of the French faculty to select areas of study that will best supplement and enhance the student’s educational preparation in French.  A course plan will be mutually agreed upon and undertaken by the student.  Evaluation of the student’s work may be through assigned written work, research reports, tests, oral presentations, conferences with faculty, etc.

FRG 610 (3) Advanced Independent Research in French—With the guidance and approval of a member of the French faculty, the student will choose a research topic or topics, engage in extensive research, and produce an agreed upon product of the research.  Topics for the professional development of the P-12 French educator must involve a French-speaking culture and may be in such areas as history, contemporary culture, literature, linguistics and language.

LEADERSHIP IN EDUCATION

LDG 610 (3) Leading by Design: Creating Small Learning Communities—Four modules explore the facets of teacher leadership. Module 1: Understanding a Professional Learning Community; Module 2: Building Shared Goals; Module 3: Managing Shared Work; Module 4: Field Experience—Opportunities to work in authentic leadership settings, shadowing school leaders and engaging in small learning communities. Clinicals: School Embedded:  15 hours; Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 614  (3)  Instructional Leadership: Part I & TLE Grad Orientation—Module I:  This course provides facilitation of a variety of skills considered essential to the successful completion of the Teacher as Leader and Literacy Specialist degrees at Asbury University.  Module II: Benchmarks of instruction will be explored using the standards within content areas of instruction with strategies to align and deliver that content.  Module III:  Facilitation of developing effective interpersonal communication skills as well as coaching and collaboration will be provided. NOTE: Literacy Specialist candidates will focus on the Kentucky Core Academic Standards for English/Language Arts. Clinicals: School embedded: 15 hours; Course embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 618 (3) Instructional Leadership: Part II—Module 1: Teaching for Understanding—Designing a unit of study that is grounded in content standards and focused on the development of understanding goals and performances of understanding; Module 2:  Differentiation of Instruction—Strategies for effective classroom practice to address the needs of individual students with both informally and formally identified instructional needs; Module 3: Cultural Responsiveness—Embracing diversity, social issues and cultural responsiveness resulting in a leader developing and nurturing them within the context of a school setting; Module 4: Field Study.  Clinicals: School Embedded: 5 hours;  Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 622 (3) Strategic Leadership—Four modules designed to understand the components of school law, planning and accountability. Module 1: Using data to identify learning needs and create plans for professional growth; Module 2: Identifying Problems of Practice; Module 3: Strategic Planning—Setting a course of action for a school based on the state and federal guidelines as they relate to vision and mission of the school; Module 4: Field Study in school improvement planning. Clinicals: School Embedded: 15 hours;  Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 629 (3) Teaching Literacy and Algebraic Thinking in Elementary School—Module 1: Understanding how to incorporate reading strategies in content area instruction in intermediate grades; Module 2: Understanding how to incorporate algebraic thinking into everyday instruction by investigating, describing and using number patterns to make predictions; Module 3: Field Study—Strategies for teaching literacy and algebraic thinking in the primary and intermediate grades. Clinicals: School Embedded: 5 hours; Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 634 (3) Curriculum Design for Accountability—Four modules are designed to give leaders a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between curriculum design and its impact on accountability. Module 1: Standards-based Instruction—Gaining an understanding of instruction that is rooted in state and national standards; Module 2: Curriculum Development—Learning how to design a developmental instructional sequence through alignment and mapping using standards; Module 3: Support for Curriculum Design & Accountability—Knowing the tools of support to enable the design and mapping of content to have the greatest impact on learning; Module 4: Field Study—Standards-based curriculum and instruction. Clinicals: School Embedded: 15 hours;  Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 636 (3) Assessment & Accountability in the Classroom—Four modules are designed to prepare the leader to maximize the implementation of assessment based upon effective use of curriculum design and accountability results. Module 1: Principles of Assessment for Learning and Assessment Quality; Module 2: Analyzing Student Work—Understanding how to utilize assessment/accountability results through research-based models; Module 3: Impacting Student Learning—Communicating Assessment Results; Module 4: Field Study—Analyzing student work. Clinicals: School Embedded: 15 hours; Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 704 (3) School Turnaround Action Research Project: Modeling Highly Effective Leadership in Low Performing Schools. Part 1, Level II—This course immerses the instructional leader with current school improvement and turnaround school research and provides the candidate clinical supervision in a low performing school setting. This course will provide strategies for leading and evaluating staff in low performing schools, building and sustaining community, leading positive school culture and directing intervention programs for gap students. An emphasis will be placed on working to transform education through research based effective staffing strategies, use of data to pinpoint instructional needs, professional development to address adversity and diverse perspectives as well as incorporating an enriched curriculum, including the arts.  Candidates develop a leadership portfolio to demonstrate a depth of understanding of Turnaround School Models through the application of the ISLLC standards, the Kentucky Dispositions, Dimensions and Functions, and Technology Standards for School Administrators. Clinicals: School Embedded: 700 hours.  Fee. 

LDG 705 (3) School Turnaround Progress Plan: Modeling Highly Effective Leadership in Low Performing Schools. Part 2, Level II—This course continues to provide the leadership candidate clinical supervision as he or she completes Level II requirements.  This course provides additional field experiences that address strategies for effective school turnaround and reform.  It incorporates the use of the action research collected and analyzed in LDG 704 and includes effective use of 21st century technology, education accountability, and the driving principles that underpin school reform. Candidates continue to develop and complete a leadership portfolio that demonstrates a depth of understanding of turnaround school research and the ISLLC standards, the Kentucky Dispositions, Dimensions and Functions, and Technology Standards for School Administrators.  At the culmination of this study, candidates will present their portfolios to an Evaluation Committee comprised of higher education and public school partners.  Clinicals: School Embedded: 700 hours.  Fee. 

LDG 706 (3) Director of Pupil Personnel: Leading Student Services—Candidates in this course will engage in the establishment of goals for pupil services based upon data; develop organizational plans for DPP services; determine resources needed for pupil services; evaluate programs for improvement; and plan for implementation of systems for effective communications, training for teachers, administrators, students, parents, community members and stakeholders.  Candidates will continue to develop and complete a leadership portfolio that demonstrates a depth of understanding of effective school research and leadership standards, the Kentucky Dispositions, Dimensions and Functions, and Technology Standards for School Administrators. Course embedded clinical hours = 10 hours and school embedded clinical hours = 10 hours.

LDG 707: (3) Director of Pupil Personnel: Seminar/Practicum—In this course candidates will spend 20 hours in clinical experiences with a successful DPP for the purpose of engaging in services for all students, investigating district policy and procedures as related to the pupil personnel services and collaborating with building administrators.  Candidates will acquire skills in monitoring community demographics, emerging trends, resources, and pertinent student data.  Candidates will learn to ensure compulsory attendance, investigate habitual truants, seek elimination of causes for irregular attendance, how to conduct effective home visits, interview students and parents, and create methods for reporting to superintendent and other stakeholders.  Candidates will continue to develop and complete a leadership portfolio that demonstrates a depth of understanding effective school research and leadership standards.  School embedded hours = 20 hours.

LDG 710 (3) Leading Teaching and Learning Instructional Leadership and Graduate Orientation—This course provides facilitation of a variety of skills considered essential to the successful completion of the Principalship licensure.  In this course aspiring principal candidates will learn what processes ensure congruency between the intended curriculum, the taught curriculum, and the assessed curriculum.  Additionally, essential skills, strategies, and understandings are gained to provide a “guaranteed” curriculum for every child, every day. Through field study candidates learn how to use effective professional development protocols to analyze student work, reflect on instructional practice, and ensure high quality of differentiated instruction for all.  An anchor assessment is completed during this field study. Module 1: The Viable Curriculum—Processes to Align, Audit, Monitor, and Evaluate Curriculum; Module 2: Analyzing Student Work—Instruction and Learning Interventions; Module 3: Ensuring High Quality Differentiated Instruction for All. Clinicals: School Embedded: 10 hours; Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 718 (3) Understanding Assessment and Monitoring Student Performance—This course focuses on developing an understanding of the complexity of national, state, and local assessment and how to use assessment results to communicate meaningful feedback on student performance. Candidates learn how to use assessment data to identify achievement gaps, determine instructional needs, monitor and improve curriculum and instruction. Through a field study and an anchor assessment, they use selected protocols to analyze student performance, plan and lead school improvement efforts. Module 1: Using Assessment to Improve Student Achievement; Module 2: Protocols for Analyzing Student Performance; Module 3: Using Data to Improve Student Achievement. Clinicals: School Embedded:  15 hours; Course Embedded: 10 hours.  Fee.

LDG 720 (3) Collaborative Performance Appraisal to Improve Student Achievement—Foundational to this course is a depth of understanding of effective teaching based on a clear vision of good instruction that is rigorous, engaging and standards-based. Candidates learn how to use the collaborative performance appraisal process that includes observation, data analysis, and formative and summative feedback to build teacher capacity and improve student achievement. Additionally, candidates participate in a field study and complete an anchor assessment. Module 1 Understanding Quality Instruction; Module 2: Observation and Quality Feedback; Module 3: Collaborative Planning for Professional Growth. Clinicals:  School Embedded: 10 hours; Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 722 (3) Financial Resources & Personnel Selection—This course centers on methods of assessing the dispositions, knowledge, and strengths of applicants and selecting the most highly qualified candidates who demonstrate knowledge, skills, and philosophy aligned to the mission and vision of the school. Aspiring principal candidates learn the legal framework for selection and hiring staff as well as effective ways in which to collaborate with colleagues in the hiring process. Candidates are placed with mentor principals to participate in the staff selection process. Module 1: Effective Teachers—Selecting High Quality Personnel; Module 2: Legal Framework and Financial Resources that Support Personnel Selection. Clinicals: School Embedded: 10 hours; Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 730 (3) Building and Sustaining Professional Learning Communities—This course provides candidates an opportunity to explore the emerging research about effective practices for creating, maintaining, and utilizing Professional Learning Communities in schools and districts. Participation in both a course and field-based Professional Learning Community provides relevant experience to deepen understanding of key theoretical concepts and complete an anchor assessment. Module 1: Organizing Professional Learning Communities around School Vision, Mission, Goals; Module 2: Organizing and Managing Shared Work within a Professional Learning Community; Module 3: Assessing and Sustaining Professional Learning Communities. Clinicals: School Embedded: 10 hours; Course Embedded: 5 hours. Fee

LDG 748 (3) Organizational Structure to Improve Student Achievement—This course centers on the critical significance of school improvement that is built upon the foundation of mission and vision aligned to shared beliefs, common commitments and clear goals for improving student achievement. Candidates learn the budgeting process, and ways in which to align resources, operational procedures, and organizational structures to achieve the vision and mission of the school. Candidates also participate in a field study and complete an anchor assessment. Module 1: Operational Mission, Vision, Shared Commitments and Clear Goals; Module 2: Aligning Organizational Structures and Leveraging Support to Improve Student Achievement; Module 3: Aligning Family and Community Resources to Support Student Achievement. Clinicals: School Embedded:  10 hours; Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 750 (3) Using Data to Improve Student Achievement—As part of the appraisal process principals learn how to construct relevant and manageable data systems and efficiently use them to collect, organize and use data for regular communication with staff, parents and the greater community for school improvement planning and continuous improvement of student achievement. Module 1: Data Wise Systems; Module 2: Collecting School Improvement Data; Module 3: Using Data to Drive Improvement. Clinicals: School Embedded:  10 hours; Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 760 (3) Financial Resources and Legal Responsibilities—This course centers on the laws, regulations, and policies under which the school must function in order to provide a safe and welcoming learning climate. The course will include topics such as school governance, student safety, due process, search and seizure, church and state issues, sexual discrimination and harassment, and special education. Module 1: School Law, Policies and Regulations; Module 2: Student Safety and School Discipline; Module 3: Financial Resources. . Clinicals: School Embedded: 10 hours; Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 763 (3) Leading Differentiated Instruction—The focus of this course is the leader’s role in building collaborative structures that provide a pyramid of interventions to ensure the learning for each child, every day. Through a field study candidates analyze and assess effective collaboration models and ways in which the needs of special learners can be met in a regular classroom setting. Module 1: Response to Intervention (RTI) for Students; Module 2: Building Parent Partnerships; Module 3: Assessing Results of RTI and Collaborative Models of Instruction. Clinicals: School Embedded:  10 hours; Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee.

LDG 775 (3) Capstone Project: Gate 8—This course brings together elements of learning in Dimensions 1-6 and culminates in a Capstone Project developed around a school improvement plan. The Capstone Project is judged by a panel of school, district, and higher education faculty.  Clinicals: School Embedded: 20 hours; Course Embedded: 5 hours.  Fee. 

LATIN EDUCATION   

LTG 510 (3) Advanced Topics in Latin Language and Literature—Students will work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in Latin to select a topic or topics that will best supplement and enhance the students' educational experience in Latin.  Although the student will read primary sources, the student will also be exposed to and become familiar with secondary material on Latin language and literature. Assessment will include one or more of the following:  oral or written examinations, Latin prose composition, a major research paper or project. 

LTG 610 (3) Advanced Topics in Roman Culture and Civilization—Students will work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in Latin to explore an aspect or aspects of Roman culture and civilization.  Although the student will read primary sources, the student will also be exposed to and become familiar with secondary material on Roman culture and civilization. Assessment will include one or more of the following:  oral or written examinations, a major research paper or project.

LITERACY EDUCATION

LTY 591 (1-3) Directed Study in Reading and Writing—Opportunity for students to do additional study in an area of need or interest.  Contract.  Fee.

LTY 600  (3) Reading and Writing in the Elementary School—This course seeks to develop the educator’s understanding of the socio-cultural, linguistic, psychological, and physiological foundations of reading and writing processes, and how these impact literacy development.  This course develops depth of understanding of the developmental stages and principles, materials, and methods of instruction involved in becoming literate and in using literacy to learn in the elementary grades.  Emphasis is given to techniques for facilitating writing growth, as well as the unique challenges of developing learners’ abilities to use writing to demonstrate their learning.  Instruction will address the use and assessment of Kentucky Core Academic Standards in English/Language Arts for P-5.  Clinicals: School embedded: 10 hours; Course embedded: 3 hours.  Fee. 

LTY 610  (3) Reading and Writing in the Content Areas in Middle/Secondary School—This course focuses on principles and methodologies currently in use for enhancing literacy in the middle/secondary school.  Understanding of research findings on best practice for promoting continuous progress of diverse adolescent learners in reading for aesthetic purposes and the unique demands of constructing meaning from informational texts will be applied to classroom practice.   The integration of content reading and writing that results in communicating meaning through various types of expository discourse will be addressed.  Instruction will address the use and assessment of Kentucky Core Academic Standards in English/Language Arts for 6-12. Clinicals: School embedded: 10 hours; Course embedded: 10 hours.  Fee.

LTY 620  (3) Clinical Assessment of Literacy—This course promotes the educator’s understanding of materials and approaches for assessing oral language, reading, and writing needs of children and adolescents who struggle in learning to construct meaning from text and/or communicate through writing.  While familiarity with summative assessment measures is developed, emphasis is placed on the use of formative assessment to inform instructional interventions with remedial students.  Instruction will address the use of formative and summative literacy assessments for diagnosing the gaps in students’ knowledge and skills based on the Kentucky Core Academic Standards in English/Language Arts for P-12.  In the embedded clinical experience, the educator will work with a child or adolescent referred to the Asbury University clinic to assess the child or adolescent’s strengths and areas of need related to reading and/or writing.  Based on the referral information, the educator will select, administer, and interpret the results of appropriate instruments, and develop a work sample that provides guidance, based on assessment results, to inform the selection of instructional interventions that are aligned to Kentucky Academic Standards in English/Language Arts for P-12.  Clinicals: School embedded: 10 hours; Course embedded: 5 hours.   Pre-requisites: LTY (RDG) 600, 610.  Fee. 

NOTE:  Students (P-12) who have been clinically assessed become part of our Reading Clinic that provides the Literacy Interventions Clinical for our candidates.

LTY 630  (3) Literacy Interventions Clinical—This clinical interventions course follows “Clinical Assessment of Literacy”.  It develops an in-depth understanding of various approaches and strategies suggested by best practice research as being effective in helping learners overcome reading and writing difficulties, and the collaborative role of the literacy specialist in working with the general educator to promote the continuous literacy progress of all students.  A supervised experience develops the educator’s first-hand experience in using various “best practice” approaches and strategies as she/he tutors a child or adolescent in the reading clinic.  Instruction will address strategies for closing the gaps in students’ knowledge and skills based on the Kentucky Core Academic Standards in English/Language Arts for P-12.  Clinicals: School embedded: 25 hours; Course embedded: 5 hours.   Pre-requisite:  LTY (RDG) 620.  Fee.

LTY 640  (2) Professional Development Seminar—This course involves the educator in crafting her/his professional development plan for gaining additional literacy knowledge and skills through district/school-based opportunities, professional reading, and professional conferences.  Using “Standards for Reading Professionals-Reading Specialist Candidate” as a benchmark, the student will assess her/his present level of development, devise a concrete plan of action for addressing areas of need, implement the plan, and report on the results.  Clinicals: School embedded: 4 hours; Course embedded: 6 hours.  Fee.

LTY 642  (3) Investigations in Literacy—This course involves the educator in identifying, explaining, and comparing theories in language development and literacy learning.  Building on this theoretical foundation, it develops the student’s knowledge of the history of literacy research and of major literacy studies—both classic and contemporary—that inform best practice in literacy instruction.  An emphasis is given to identifying gaps in research-based knowledge and guiding educators to develop questions related to literacy education that she/he would like to investigate through an action research approach. Clinicals: School embedded: 8 hours; Course embedded: 12 hours.  Fee.

LTY 644  (3) Leadership in Literacy Programs—This course encompasses special topics related to the role of the literacy specialist in providing school/community leadership for the enhancement of literacy education.  Topics will include curriculum and program evaluation, development of literacy coaching skills, development of skills (using technology) for collecting, analyzing, diagnosing, prescribing, and reporting literacy data trends, building capacity for collaboration between general and special educators, providing professional development workshops, grant writing, collaborating with and empowering diverse families, and building community/school partnerships. Clinicals: School embedded: 15 hours; Course embedded: 5 hours.  Pre-requisite: LDG 614.  Fee.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION  

MBA 501 (3) Business Ethics: Stewardship of Spiritual Capital—The topics of spirituality, business ethics, and calling from a Christian perspective will be explored as well as what it means to integrate one’s faith and work in a holistic manner that impacts the global marketplace.

MBA 502 (3) Foundations of International Business and Economics—A study of the nature of international financial markets including the balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, and hedging instruments. Additional topics related to the financial management of multinational corporations will be covered. 

MBA 503 (3) Management Accounting—Accounting practices, GAAP, as well as other international standards, such as IFRS, available to value aspects of an enterprise will be covered. The cost structure of a business, including product costing, overhead analysis, variance analysis, as well as decision-making tools required to effectively manage the underlying cost drivers of a business will be covered. The perspective of the course will be from a user of the information for decision-making purposes. 

MBA 504 (3) Finance: Stewardship of Economic Capital—Financial management concepts such as present value, stock and bond valuation, capital budgeting, capital structures, financial forecasting, and working capital management will be covered. Additional subjects will include valuations, and different sources and uses of capital available in order for the leaders to be good stewards of the organization.

MBA 505 (3) Global Operations and Data Management—An overview of design, control, and improvement of production and service systems. Topics including operations strategies, product design, process selection, and quality management are covered. This course will also utilize tools to aid decision-making. Skills such as data collection, preparation, analysis, and interpretation will be taught.

MBA 506 (3) Strategic Marketing—A study of current challenges in today’s global marketing environment. A key aspect is understanding the need to develop a competitive advantage by creating customer value. Further understanding of marketing strategies, positioning, market segmentation, pricing, communication, and distribution channels will take place. Emphasis will be on developing skill for entering new markets.

MBA 507  (3) Strategic Leadership: Stewardship of Social Capital—This course provides practical understandings into internal and external factors which impact the effectiveness of leaders and an understanding of the dynamics of leadership skills and behaviors necessary to function in a competitive, international environment. Topics such as characteristics of leaders, change leadership, transformational leadership, and servant leadership will be covered.

MBA 508 (3) Entrepreneurship & Innovation—A study of entrepreneurship and the skills and practices needed to launch a sustainable venture. This involves understanding how to stimulate creativity, innovation management, new product development, and becoming a learning organization.

MBA 601 (1.5) Communication & Culture—An understanding of the various aspects and theories of culture to help the student prepare for and execute strategies for communication with people from various cultures will be taught. The students will gain communication skills that can be used in global environments.

MBA 602 (1.5) Social Entrepreneurship—A study of the business principles that are being applied to solving the world’s humanitarian problems such as poverty, homelessness, malnutrition, and infectious diseases. This course introduces the field of social entrepreneurship and the effective governance of nonprofit organizations.

MBA 603 (1.5) The Global Organization—Focuses on various aspects of creating, growing, and managing a global organization. Topics such as going to market, sustainability, and opportunity analysis are covered. This course also brings a Christian worldview perspective on international business and how companies should manage in this environment.

MBA 604 (1.5) The Nonprofit Organization—Explores how a nonprofit organization develops and emerges and how the best practices of nonprofit management: supervision, planning, budgeting, fundraising and marketing can be most effectively administered.

MBA 605 (1.5) Negotiations—An introduction to negotiations in both domestic and global contexts. Students will work through real life exercises including scenarios and case studies.

MBA 606 (1.5) Legal Environment of Business—An overview of international business law focusing on the legal environment, contracts, commercial transactions, and business organizations.

MBA 607 (3) Capstone Strategy Class—In this course students will investigate industries and ideas, research alternatives, and develop competitive strategies in order to create viable business plans that meet very demanding investment audiences.

MBA 693 (1-3) MBA Seminar—Designated special-interest classes, seminars, or field experiences supervised by faculty, with the appropriate course requirements.  Credit may be given more than once. 

MEDIA COMMUNICATIONS

MCG 500 (3) Audio Production Basics (MC 121)—A broad overview of audio production including audio theory, basic digital audio techniques, basic audio recording and mixing techniques, and familiarity with relevant software and hardware.  Fee.

MCG 501 (3) Multi-Camera Television Production (MC261) —Survey of the theory, process, and technique of television production including the planning, preparation, and production of various types of studio and remote programs.  Includes three-hour lecture and a lab.  Fee.

MCG 502 (3) Digital Field & Post-Production (MC 302)—Techniques in television field production.  Special emphasis on single-camera, film-style shooting, field lighting and audio, producing, budgeting, working with clients, and post-production editing.  Pre-requisite: MC 261 or MCG 501or equivalent.  Fee. 

MCG 510 (3) Cinematography & Lighting (MC 310)— Introduces students to the fundamental theory and practice of cinematography and lighting for film and video.  We will examine the technical and the aesthetic aspects of cinematography and learn how to apply this knowledge to practical cinematographic choices.  Pre-requisite: MC 302 or MCG 502 or equivalent.  Fee.

MCG 511 (3) Directing the Narrative Film (MC 341)—An introduction to directing for film. We will cover all the things it takes to direct short or feature-length film such as developing a visual language, understanding subtext, learning to direct actors, and executing the theme of your film through directing choices.  Each student will be responsible for directing one project that will be submitted to the Highbridge Film Festival or other festival approved by your graduate advisor.  In addition, we will be doing in-class workshops that cover actor coaching, creating shot lists and storyboards, and re-writing.  Pre-requisite: MC 302 or MCG 502 or equivalent. Fee.

MCG 512 (3) Film Production (MC 382)—Students work collaboratively to shoot, direct and edit a narrative short or feature digital film production. This is an intense, hands-on course that requires each student to fulfill one of the key roles in the film production process.  Fee.

MCG 518 (3) Sound Design for Sports (MC 324)—An in-depth review of capturing the sound of sports competition. This class will study current audio techniques in stereo and surround sound for television as well as discuss the emerging audio technologies. Students will explore how the story is enhanced by quality audio. (Online only)  Pre-requisite: MC 121 or MCG 500 or equivalent. Fee.

MCG 520 (3) Design for Film, Television, & Theatre (MC 325)—Students will explore how design influences storytelling by studying design concepts for film, television and theatre. They will learn how to analyze a script and create a design plan including costuming, sets, and props. (Online only)  Pre-requisite: MC 302 or MCG 502 or equivalent. Fee.

MCG 521 (3) Advanced Directing (MC 401)—This advanced directing course will be challenge students to hone their aesthetic and storytelling skills through the creation of a project.  In addition, the course will examine advanced camera, storytelling, and actor coaching techniques.  Pre-requisites: MC 341 or MCG 511or equivalent.  Fee.

MCG 524 (3) Producing the Film (MC 338)—This course will explore the essential principles of producing for film and film for television. It will examine key concepts in financing, film monetization, distribution, crew hiring, budgeting, working with guilds, form creation, entertainment management, and various aspects of hands-on producing. Fee.

MCG 525 (3) Sports Storytelling (MC 326)—Sports Storytelling will study the relationships between the director and producer and the storytelling creative process in television sports. Content will focus on features as well as multi-camera production. (Online only)  Pre-requisite: MC 302 or MCG 502 or equivalent. Fee.

MCG 526 (3) Designing & Creating with AfterEffects (MC 328)—This course is a hands-on course that covers the creation of projects with Adobe AfterEffects. Students will begin with the basics such as creating compositions and importing files. The class will then move on to animations, masks, text and some basic 3D. Fee.

MCG 528 (3) Editing Practice & Theory (MC 340)—This course will explore the practicalities and theories of film and video editing. It will provide advanced software editing techniques and the complicated procedures of post-production with an emphasis on importing footage and exporting to various formats.  The course will also explore key aesthetic approaches to editing narrative film.  Pre-requisite: MC 302 or MCG 502 or equivalent. Fee.

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION   

MTG 510 (3) Advanced Topics in Mathematics—Students will work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in the mathematics/computer science department to select topic(s) that will best supplement and enhance the student's educational experience in the mathematical sciences.  This process will involve diagnostic tests, student surveys, and individual student/teacher conferences. Progress in the resulting professional development plan will be assessed from assigned written work, research reports, tests and oral presentations.

MTG 610 (3) Advanced Independent Research—Student will select a topic of importance in the area of mathematics or mathematics education that is appropriate to the professional development of a Grades 8-12 mathematics educator.  The research topic must be approved by a small committee appointed by the chair of the mathematics/computer science department and performed under the direct supervision of a member of the department. A paper of the quality to be presented in a professional meeting at the state or national level must be written upon completion of the project. Pre-requisite: MTG 510.

SPECIAL EDUCATION   

SEG 520 (3) Exceptional Learner in the General Education Classroom (ED 320)—An introduction to the field of special education dealing with the learning needs of exceptional children - those who are gifted and those who have intellectual, emotional, physical, or sensory disabilities. Course emphasis is on principles and procedures for adapting educational programs to accommodate the needs of these children in the general education classrooms. School-embedded clinical experience required. Clinicals: Course embedded– 5 hours and School-Embedded 10 hours.  Fee.

SEG/ESW 630 (3) Behavioral Intervention of Students with Learning and Behavior Disabilities—This course offers principles and techniques for managing the behavior of children and youth with disabilities.  Preventive, supportive, and corrective techniques are included.  The focus of the course will be on applied behavior analysis and the designing and implementing of behavioral management plans. Consultation techniques for indirect service to students will be included.  (Field experience required). Clinicals: School embedded: 10 hours; Course embedded: 5 hours. Pre-requisite:  SEG 520 or equivalent.  Fee.

SEG/ESW 632 (3) Collaboration and Advocacy for Special Populations—This course focuses on collaborative models and appropriate techniques for cooperative working relationships in the school setting.  Pertinent legislation and issues of advocacy for the student, parent, and teacher will be explored and applied to current principles for the development of educational programming for students with disabilities. Clinicals:  Course embedded: 5 hours. Pre-requisite: SEG 520 or equivalent.  Fee.

SEG 634 (3) Early Childhood Education of Special Populations—An overview of the special needs of young children including the discussions of historical and empirical support for providing early intervention services; assessment, instructional methodologies, family involvement and including children with and without disabilities.  Attention will be given to assessing and assisting achievement of cognitive, language, social, and motor skills. Clinicals: School embedded: 5 hours; Course embedded: 5 hours.  Pre-requisite: SEG 520 or equivalent.  Fee.

SEG/ESW 638 (3) Introduction to Students with Learning and Behavior Disabilities—The learning, behavioral, and emotional problems of children and youth are explored in the context of theory, etiology, assessment, and practice.  Issues of educational programming and community agency support are considered.  (Field experience required) Clinicals: School embedded: 5 hours; Course embedded: 5 hours. Pre-requisite:  SEG 520 or equivalent.  Fee.

SEG 640 (3) Language Learning and Literacy for Special Populations—An in-depth look at theories and research in oracy and literacy acquisition.  Attention will be given to identifying students with perceptual and language processing difficulties as well as developing expertise in appropriate instructional strategies. Clinicals: School embedded: 5 hours; Course embedded: 5 hours.  Fee. 

SEG 642 (3) Mathematics Education for Special Populations—An in-depth look at the development of mathematical concepts and productivity.  Attention will be given to assessment of students with mathematical disabilities and the incorporation of instructional strategies to develop mathematical numeracy. Clinicals: School embedded: 5 hours; Course embedded: 5 hours.  Fee. 

SEG 660 (3) Methods and Assessment for Special Populations I—The administration of formal achievement testing and informal measures of curriculum-based assessment will be addressed. Emphasis will be on the IEP development and educational programming for students with disabilities.  (Clinical Component I) Clinicals: School embedded: 5 hours; Course embedded: 10 hours.  Pre-requisites:  SEG 520 or equivalent; EDG 636, SEG 630, 638, 640, 642.  Fee.

SEG 670 (3) Research Statistics and Single-Subject Design—This course enables students to read, interpret, and use single-subject research design methods for children with disabilities in the classroom setting.  Proposal components of the exit research project are completed in this course. Clinicals: School embedded: 5 hours; Course embedded: 5 hours.  Pre-requisites: SEG 520 or equivalent; EDG 636, SEG 630, 638, 642.  Fee. 

SEG 672 (3) Methods and Assessment for Special Populations II—A more intensive study of assessment related to the individual progress of students in individual group settings will occur. Monitoring of individual progress and the implementation of systematic teaching procedures and cognitive strategies are addressed.  (Field Component II) Clinicals: School embedded: 5 hours; Course embedded: 10 hours.  Pre-requisites:  EDG/SEG 601, SEG 660.  Fee.

SEG 695 (2-3) Clinical Component III (MSD)— This course provides an additional 150 hours of supervised field experience for educators preparing to teach students Moderate and Severe Disabilities. Pre-requisites: SEG 660, and EDG/SEG 700 or 701, and University of KY Courses EDS 530, 546, 548, and 549.  Fee.

SPANISH EDUCATION    

SPG 510 (3) Advanced Topics in Spanish—Students will work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in Spanish to select a topic or topics that will best supplement and enhance the student’s educational preparation in Spanish.  A course plan will be mutually agreed upon and undertaken by the student.  Evaluation o f the student’s work may be through assigned written work, research reports, tests, oral presentations, conferences with faculty, etc.

SPG 610 (3) Advanced Independent Research in Spanish—The student will select a topic (or topics) of importance in the area of Spanish language, literature, linguistics or culture that is (are) appropriate to the professional development of a P-12 Spanish educator.  Assessment will include one or more of the following:  oral or written examinations, a major research paper or project.

SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION  

SSG 510 (3) Advanced Topics in History—Students will work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in the History Department to select topics that will best supplement and enhance the student’s educational experience in history.  The student will complete readings from an assigned bibliography that includes both primary and secondary sources and prepare a series of evaluative reports on the readings.  Oral presentations may also be required.

SSG 610 (3) Advanced Independent Research—Students will work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in the History Department to select, design, and carry to completion a research project in history.  The project should represent original research in either the general field of historical studies or the area of history education. The project’s finished product should rise to the level of a paper or article suitable for publication and/or presentation at a professional meeting.

SOCIAL WORK    

SWG 520 (3) Social and Cultural Diversity—Study of social and cultural diversity in working with individuals, groups, families, communities and organizations and is framed by the Biblical affirmations that all persons are of inherent worth, are unconditionally loved and are intended to live in communities that protect and enhance their dignity and potential.  Diversity within this course includes: people of color, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, religion/denominational affiliation, and disabled persons.  Theories of oppression, discrimination, and social injustice; and their implication for social work practice are included.

SWG 525 (3) Human Behavior and Social Environment I—Applies theories and concepts from the behavioral and social sciences to the development of individuals and families.  Theories of biological, psychological, social, cognitive, moral and spiritual development are studied in order to understand identity formation of individuals and the impact of individual development on family systems.  Theories of family development are also included.

SWG 530 (3) Practice I—Prepares students for generalist social work practice with individuals and families.  A strengths-based generalist approach to practice is the foundation for learning specific communication and counseling skills for working with individuals and families.  Co-requisite: SW 525.  [Part-time student Pre-requisite: SWG 525].

SWG 535 (3) Psychopathology and Assessment—Provides an understanding of various kinds of disorders that social work clients in mental health and other settings may experience.  Helps students define the clinical entities, to explore their etiology and natural course, and to learn how to link diagnosis, assessment and intervention.  Emphasis placed on concepts of labeling and stigmatization, and how to employ an empowerment approach with clients who suffer from these disorders.  Complexity of the intersection between mental/emotional and physical selves explored. 

SWG 540 (3) Social Work Policy and Services—Provides a foundation in the historical context of social work practice, including a specific focus on the significant role of the Church in the development of social welfare systems both past and present.  This historical context is from the Elizabethan foundation of social work to the present. Students will gain skills in social welfare policy analysis that impacts individuals, groups, families, communities and organizations.  Attention will be given to the function social welfare policy serves in addressing oppression, discrimination and social injustices and to how a framework of Christian ethics from Wesleyan perspective provides a framework and a dynamic for policy advocacy and development that advances justice.

SWG 550 (3) Field Instruction I—First part of the foundation practice supervised field experience.  Begins in mid-October of the student’s first year of study in the program, and includes 144 hours of field experience (18 hrs./ 8 wks.).  Applies social work knowledge, values and skills in working as a generalist social worker.  Includes a field seminar that meets biweekly for 2 hours for the entire semester and is designed to support students during the beginning of their field experience and to assist in connecting classroom learning and the field experience.  Co-requisite:  SWG 530.  [Part-time student takes in 2nd year.]  Fee.

SWG 560 (3) Social Work Research—Introduces students to research design, sampling, data collection and data analysis procedures.  Theoretical bases for development of research questions and conducting research are analyzed.  The similarities and differences of practice and research processes are evaluated.  The reciprocity between practice and research, particularly the use of single system design, is explored as a means to evaluate one’s own practice.  Both qualitative and quantitative methodologies are examined using research questions as a basis for selecting one or both types of methodologies in a study design.  Statistics are reviewed with a particularly focus on SPSS for computer-assisted analysis of data.  Pre-requisite:  PSY 315

SWG 565 (3) Human Behavior and Social Environment II—Applies theories and concepts about group, community and organizational development in order to understand client systems at all levels.  Assessment strategies for working with mezzo and macro systems are included in this course, in order to provide a context for understanding system change at these levels.  Particular emphasis is on social change related to oppression, discrimination and social injustice, with particular reference to the Biblical principles of social holiness as a foundation for servicing the needs of the poor, disenfranchised, and children and advocating for social justice.  Pre-requisites:  SWG 520, 525.

SWG 567 (3) Spiritual Formation and Social Work (SW 385)This course is an exploratory effort to probe the connections between spiritual formation and social work.  It arises from the belief that an integrated conceptualization of Christian social work is a rich source of vision, compassion and ability; and is more efficacious than a compartmentalized model in which so-called “secular” social work is done by persons who also happen to be Christians.

SWG 570 (3) Practice II—Continues to prepare students as generalist social work practitioners from a strengths-based perspective.  The focus in this course is on theories and skills in working with groups, communities and organizations.  Co-requisite:  SWG 565.  [Part-time student Pre-requisite: SWG 565.]

SWG 580 (3) Social Work and Wesleyan Theology—In-depth examination of the integration of Wesleyan Christian theology and social work.  Students will deepen and broaden their knowledge of basic Wesleyan theological doctrines and principles and explore their application and relevance to social work purposes, values, ethics, history and practice in church-based and in traditional social work agencies.

SWG 585 (3) Advanced Standing Seminar I—A reading course designed to evaluate and prepare advanced standing students for beginning the graduate level work in the MSW program.  This course and SWG 595 Seminar II guide students in a review of generalist knowledge, values and skills as well as acquaints them with foundational readings relevant to the mission and goals of the MSW program at Asbury University.  Pre-requisite:  advanced standing admission.

SWG 590 (3) Field Instruction II—Continuation of Field Instruction I which includes 270 hours (18 hrs./15 wks.) of the required 414 hours of foundation year field placement.  Field Instruction II occurs throughout the spring semester of the foundation year of study.  A formalized Learning Agreement is developed and is the framework for the ongoing learning experience during this semester.  Includes a field seminar that meets biweekly for 2 hours and is designed to support students in connecting classroom learning and the field experience.  Co-requisite:  SWG 570.  [Part-time student takes in 2nd year.]  Fee.

SWG 591 (1-3) Directed Study—Opportunity for students to do additional study in an area of need or interest. Contract.

SWG 595 (3) Advanced Standing Seminar II—Continues to prepare advanced standing students for entry into the graduate level of study in the MSW program. This is an on-campus course with an emphasis on reviewing and adding to the generalist practice knowledge and skills offered at the undergraduate level.  This course also includes content on research process and skills at a producer level, rather than the consumer level that is taught in most undergraduate programs.  Pre-requisite:  advanced standing admission.

SWG 630 (3) Advanced Theories in Practice with Family Systems—An integrative family-centered model to social work practice is presented in this course and is the organizing framework to learn about various individual and family therapy approaches that can be used with children, adolescents, adults and/or family systems.  The theories presented in the course includes:  Bowen’s family systems, Structural family therapy, Strategic, solution-focused, narrative, cognitive-behavioral experiential, and psychodynamic therapy.  The assessment and therapeutic process, presented in this course, focuses on relationship-building with individual family members, subsystems, and the entire family system.  Assessment is presented relevant to these various treatment approaches.

SWG 640 (3) Child and Family Policy—Reviews the roots of contemporary family policy and the construction of national family policy relevant to child and families.  It applies policy analysis skills, learned in the foundation year, to the examination of current policies and their impact on service delivery to client system, with a specific emphasis on low-income populations.  The various levels where policy is forged through debate, enacted, and implemented as examined.

SWG 650 (3) Field Instruction III—This course is the first part of the advanced practice supervised field experience.  The field experience begins in September and continues through December.  The student completes 270 hours of field experience (18 hours for 15 weeks).  A formalized Learning Agreement is developed and is the framework for the ongoing learning experience during this semester.  The focus of the field experience is to apply social work knowledge, values and skills in working as an advanced social work practitioner with children, adolescents, adults, and/or family systems.  The course includes a field seminar that meets biweekly for 2 hours for the entire semester and is designed to assist students to integrate classroom learning with the field experiences.  This course is taken simultaneously with Advanced Theories in Practice, and is in the 4th year of the part-time program.  Fee.

SWG 661 (2) Applied Research–Need Assessment—This applied research course option focuses on need assessment studies.  The process for conducting a need assessment for new services by a new agency or existing agency is presented.  The students apply the research processes and skills, taught in the foundation course, by conducting actual need assessment study as an individual or as a group.

SWG 662 (2) Applied Research–Program Outcomes—This applied research course option focuses on program outcomes.  The students are taught advanced skills in conducting program outcome evaluation for their own practice as well as at an agency level.  During the semester the students are involved in program outcome measurement within an agency setting.  This setting may be their concentration year field placement or another setting arranged by the course professor.  The study is conducted either individually or with a group.

SWG 663 (3) Grantsmanship—This course option focuses on proposal writing.  The students are taught the process for completing a proposal for funding of new or existing services provided by a social work agency.  The students participate, during the semester, in writing a proposal based on actual guidelines from a funding source.  The project is either individual or as a group.  It is not necessary for the actual proposal to be submitted to the funding source in order to complete the course.  The experience of proposal writing is the key focus of the course.

SWG 670 (3) Advanced Interventions with Children and Families—Explores advanced theory and intervention approaches for social work practice with individuals, and family systems.  Application of advanced practice theories is made to specific treatment issues experienced by children, adolescents, adult couples and family systems.  Students research and analyze selected interventions, and conduct a training presentation for their colleagues.  The final assignment in this course is for students to develop their own model of practice, as a responsible eclectic social work practitioner.

SWG 680 (2) Social Justice and Ethical Issues—This is the integrative capstone course for the program.  The course examines principles and theories that influence and define the concept of social justice.  The interface of the Judeo-Christian value perspective and social work values, attitudes and principles is analyzed.  Based on the theories of social justice and on Christian theological principles, particularly the responsibility for Christian disciples to advance social holiness, students explore value perspectives, decision-making and ethical actions in social work practice.  Specific service and advocacy needs of low income populations are examined.  Must be taken in the final semester of the program.

SWG 690 (3) Field Instruction IV—Continuation of Field Instruction III which includes 270 hours of field experience (18 hrs./15 weeks) of the required 540 hours of advanced field placement.  A formalized Learning Agreement is developed and is the framework for the ongoing learning experience during this semester.  The course includes a field seminar that meets biweekly for 2 hours and is designed to assist students to integrate classroom learning with the field experiences.  Co-requisite:  SWG 670.  [Part-time students take in 4th year.]  Fee.

SWG 695 (3) School Social Work Field Education I—This course is for persons who hold an MSW from Asbury University and are subsequently enrolled in the School Social Worker Certification track.  The course requires a minimum of 270 hours in a school setting. Contract.

SWG 710 (3) International Social Work—Experientially-based course that explores social work in an international context(s) in collaboration with Christian-faith-based organizations engaged in social services, community development and/or disaster relief activities. The course is centered in a 7-10 day visit to an international social work context where students will experience a non-U.S. culture, experience a contrasting social welfare system, engage in dialogue with service-providers and policy-makers and provide direct-service to low-income families and/or children.  The international on-site component will be preceded and followed by required seminars.  Pre-requisite: approval of instructor.

SWG 720 (3) Multidimensional Assessment—Designed to provide student with differential assessment knowledge and skills for working with mental health settings with children, adolescents, and/or adults.  Using a multidimensional approach based on a strengths perspective, the course provides skills related to various aspects of assessment – processes, instruments, and skills.  The impact of discrimination, oppression and economic deprivation, and the roles of values and ethics are also explored.  Co-requisite or Pre-requisite:  SWG 535.  Fee.

SWG 730 (3) Decision Case Analysis: Real Time Decision Making for Social Work Practice—This online course utilizes a decision case analysis approach that integrates content from all areas of social work curriculum (human behavior theory, practice, research, social welfare policy, ethics) as well as faith considerations.  Students read numerous cases and apply an analytical framework to explore alternative strategies and to offer recommendations.  Summer.  Contract.

SWG 733 (3) Family Violence—In-depth analysis of the dynamics of family violence.  The analysis considers social, political and economic dynamics that affect individuals and families.  Appropriate assessment and treatment strategies to restore healthy family functioning and empower the victims are examined.  Emphasis is on the need for quality direct services as well as public policy change.

SWG 795 (3) School Social Work Field Education II—This course is for persons who hold an MSW from Asbury University and are subsequently enrolled in the School Social Worker Certification track.  The course requires a minimum of 270 hours in a school setting distinct from the school level experienced for SWG 695. Contract. 

TEACHING ESL

TEL 500 (3) Introduction to Teaching English as a Second Language—Presents theories of language learning and factors which impede language learning.  Designed to provide theoretical and practical experience in language acquisition.  Students will provide tutorial assistance to non-native English speakers. Clinicals: School embedded: 5 hours; Course embedded: 5.  Fee.

TEL 531 (3) Linguistics and Advanced Grammar—An introduction to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of the English language. Clinicals: School embedded: 5 hours; Course embedded: 5.  Fee.

TEL 535 (3) Sound Systems of Language—Phonetics involves the study of human speech sounds, including articulatory phonetics, acoustic phonetics, and auditory phonetics.  Phonology is the study of sound systems of languages, including how phonemes and allophones form integrated systems in particular languages resulting in differences from one language to another.  Clinicals: School embedded: 5 hours; Course embedded: 5. Pre-requisite: TEL 531.  Fee.

TEL 536 (3) Grammatical Structure of Language—Morphology is the word formation system of languages, including how morpheme and allomorphs form integrated systems in particular languages resulting in differences from one language to another.  The study moves to syntax and how these smaller units are used to form sentences and how sentences relate to one another.  Clinicals: School embedded: 5 hours; Course embedded: 5.  Pre-requisite: TEL 531.  Fee.

TEL 618 (3)  Teaching ESL Methods I/Culture—Addresses current methods and materials for teaching English as a Second Language with a particular emphasis on culturally responsive instruction. Focuses on theory made practical with a strong emphasis on ethical and intercultural sensitivity. Includes practicum experiences to ensure classroom confidence and success. Clinicals: Course embedded– 5 hours and School-Embedded 5 hours.  Pre-requisites:  TEL 500, 531.   Fee.

TEL 619 (3) ESL Methods II/Assessment—Addresses methods of assessment for teaching English Learners (EL) with an emphasis on a systemic assessment process as well as ethical and intercultural sensitivity.  Students will be introduced to criteria to ensure consistent identification of EL students, as well as to determine their eligibility, placement and duration of programs and services based on English language proficiency assessment.  Candidates will acquire knowledge and skills related to language proficiency assessments that are linked to the new common curriculum, appropriate standardized assessments and formative and summative assessments used for English Learners. Candidates will be prepared to analyze assessment results to create intervention plans and to design instruction and monitor progress for English Learners.  This course is designed to provide methods for assessing the effectiveness of school-based language instructional programs to inform future program improvements. Clinicals: Course embedded– 5 hours and School-Embedded 5 hours.  Fee.

UNIVERSITY STUDIES 

UNV 510 (0.5-1) Strategies for College Success—Strategies for college success is offered for students in an approved support program. The course is designed to help the student:  (1) identify personal strengths and weaknesses; (2) create an individual college plan; (3) demonstrate competency in note-taking; (4) complete weekly management sheets; (5) demonstrate writing competency in journal writing.  This seminar provides a systematic structure to address the above concerns.  No more than one semester hour may be applied toward the total required semester hours for graduation.  Credit/No Credit. 

 

2014-15 BULLETIN  08/04/2013