Dr. William Douce '48 - 1993 A Award Recipient

Bio from 1993

We honor a graduate who first encountered God’s divine call on a farm in the back woods of Ohio.  Getting to Asbury College was not easy.  First, Dr. William Douce was drafted into the U.S. Army during World War II.  There, he drove an ambulance and worked as a surgical technician.  Already, he was being trained for a career in medicine.   A campus scrapbook noted the making of a missionary doctor—studies in pre-med, gung-ho involvement in athletics and the student volunteer movement.  Membership in the Spanish Club was perhaps a prelude to a lifetime of service where Spanish was to be his primary language.   
 
With the completion of medical school in Philadelphia,and then deputation as a missionary candidate, Dr. Douce was off to South America.  He went first to Ecuador to the city of Guyaquil to establish an urban clinic.  Then Saraguro, an isolated town situated in a mountainous region.    

That was 1959.  This servant on a mission discovered a town with no doctor—a people where no evangelical missionary had ever gone.  For more than three decades, this missionary doctor and his wife immersed themselves in ministry to meet the physical and spiritual needs of Indians all across that rugged province of Ecuador.   
 
We salute Dr. William Douce for reasons perhaps peculiar to the world.  No headlines in American newspapers.  No great medical research to attract national acclaim.  Nothing on record to bring fame and fortune.  A life invested where he worked quietly but faithfully.

  • The development of a large medical clinic.
  • Medical caravans to remote mountain towns.  
  • Leadership in evangelism and church planting.
  • A vocational Bible Training Institute


I suppose we shall never know this side of heaven the full impact this man has had on the people of Ecuador.
On March 10th of 1992, dignitaries gathered in the Civic Hall of Saraguro to honor this compassionate servant of Christ.  In keeping with plans for retirement and return to the United States in the spring of 1993, the federal government of Ecuador also honored Dr. William Douce.

It is a privilege to honor Dr. William Douce from the class of 1948 for the investment of his life in the people of Ecuador.  In so doing, we also salute and honor Ilene Mosher Douce, an Asburian, and dear partner for those many years.

Other 1993 A Award Recipients:

Mrs. Olive Johnson '43 McLendon
Mr. Frank Roughton Harvey '53